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OCTOBER, ig25 



No. I 



about 

His 

Clothes 




He may he your husband, your son, or a hrother, and 
you esteem him for himself, but you do wish he had a 
bit better luck with his clothes. 

May we suggest, that with that diplomacy which every 
woman must master in dealing with the secondary sex, 
you kindly lead him into a department where the se- 
lection of the right clothes, at the right price, is not a 
matter of chance, but a quite secure certainty? 

You may depend upon our complete, and grateful, co- 
operation. 



MULLEN & BLUETT 



CLOTHIERS 



Broadway at Sixth Hollywood Blvd. at Vine 

Pasadena in October 




'Hi- 



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oAsk Your T)ealer 



Kling Manufacturing Co., Los Angeles 



1138^1 




Vol. XVI OCTOBER, 1925 No. 1 

Published Monthly Office Mission St. and Mound Ave., South Pasadena, Calif. 

Telephone VAndike OUl 

Subscription Price 50 Cents Per Year, Ten Cents the Copy Send subscriptions to Mrs. Bert Clifltord, Boi 26, 

South Pasadena, Cal. 

Edited by the Press Chairmen of the Clubs Represented 
Entered at the South Pasadena Postoffice as second-class matter. 



A. T. BAKER & CO., Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

VELOURS 



and 



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for UPHOLSTERY PURPOSES 



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Write lor Descriptive Folder 

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Page 4 



The CLUBWOMAN 



STOP 

Before You Buy Your Fall and IVinter Clothing 

GO 

to the 

O. W. Thomas Company 

©rj> Cleaners! anb J^persi 

and consult them about reconditioning the garments you have. 



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In Our Ovin Building 

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Of the 80,000 Edison Partner, 32,848 are women 

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Edison Building, 306 West Third Street, Los Angeles 
Phone MAin 7120 



OCTOBER, 1925 



Page 5 



Kj!f^ 



Contents 



<-"**_> 



Hollywood Woman's Club _ 6 

Los Angeles Ebell _ 7 

Friday Morning Club 9 

Wednesday Morning Club _ _. 10 

Los Angeles District, C. F. W. C 10 

Highland Park Ebell _ 11 

Long Beach Ebell 12 

Philanthropy and Civics Club _ 12 

Santa Monica Bay Woman's Club 13 

Lincoln Study Club _ 14 

Woman's Club of Coachella Valley _ 14 

Buena Park Woman's Club 14 

Community Club of Santa Maria 14 

Kate Tupper Galpin Shakespeare Club 15 

Oxnard Monday Club _ 16 

Montebello Woman's Club _ 16 

Artesia Woman's Club _ 16 

Mission Acres Woman's Club 16 

Laguna Beach Woman's Club 17 

Woman's Club of Fallbrook 17 

Minerva Library Club _ 17 

Owensmouth Woman's Club _ 17 

American University Study Club 17 

Santa Barbara Nurses' Association 18 

Placentia Round Table 18 

San Gabriel Woman's Club 18 

Community Club of Michillinda _ 19 

U. S. C. Women's Club 19 

Community Club of Betteravia 19 

Newhall Woman's Club _ 19 

College Women's Club of Long Beach 21 

Current Events Club of Ontario 21 

Professional Women's Club _ _. 22 

Bellflower Woman's Club 24 

History and Landmarks Study Club 24 

Woman's Civic Club of Pismo Beach 24 

Sierra Madre Woman's Club 24 

University Book Club _ 25 

Woman's Club of Hawthorne _ 25 

Woman's Improvement Club of Corona 25 

Los Angeles Tuesday Morning Club ...„ 25 

Norwalk Woman's Club 26 

Neptunian Club 26 

Lompoc Alpha Club 26 

Women's Twentieth Century Club 28 

Poinsetta Club 28 

Woman's Club of Downey 29 

Pacific Beach Reading Club 29 

Women's League of Newport Beach 29 

Elysian Heights Civic Club 30 

Pomona Woman's Club _ 31 

California History and Landmarks Club 31 

Woman's Club of Claremont 32 

San Jacinto Woman's Club 32 

Ivy Club 32 

Woman's Club of Hermosa Beach _ 32 

Huntington Park Ebell Club _ 33 

Santa Barbara Woman's Club _ 33 

L. U. B. A. Club of Long Beach 33 

Cucamonga Woman's Club _. 34 



Have You Read the Follow- 
ing of the Best Sellers of 
the Past Month? 

The Constant Nymph, by Margaret 
Kennedy $2.00 

Arrowsmith, by Sinclair Lewis 2.00 

Glorious Apollo, by E. Barrington.... 2.50 

A Son of His Father, by Harold Bell 
Wright 2.00 

The Peasants, by Ladislas Reymont 2.50 

When We Were Very Young, by 
A. A. Milne 2.00 

The Man Nobody Knows, by Bruce 
Barton 2.50 



The JONES 



Opposite 

Square BOOK StOrC 

Los Angeles, California 

TRinity 43 II 



426-428 
West 
Sixth 



we- 



destroy 
moths 



in clothing — in uphostering — 
pianos — rugs, by our excusive 
scientific fumigation process in 
the Plymetl "Air-Tite" vaults. 
Phone WEstmore 4141. 

1335 So. Figueroa St. 
5th and Alameda Sts. 
Los Angeles 




Los Angeles 



San F: 



rancisco 



Oakland 



Fresno 



Page 6 



The CLUBWOMAN 



WOMAW^ eWB OF-HOIiL^WOOD 




By Jessica B. Noble, Assistant Press Chairman 



The Woman's Club of Hollywood holds its first 
meeting of the new club year on Wednesday, Octo- 
ber 7, at 2:30 p. m. This is known as President's 
Day, and Mrs. Charles H. Richmond will give a 
talk on "Our Club — Its Plans and Prospects." A 
musical program will be furnished by the Fitzgerald 
Music Company. At 3:30 members and guests will 
■adjourn to the lounge room for a tea and reception 
in honor of Mrs. J. J. Carter, Hollyood's beloved 
community leader. 

Officers of the club for the following year are: 
President, Mrs. Charles H. Richmond ; first vice- 
president, Mrs. C. J. Shepherd ; second vice-president, 
Mrs. Harry W. Hanson; third vice-president, Mrs. 
C. B. Cleveland ; recording secretary. Miss Mary E. 
Hamlin; corresponding secretary, Mrs. Percy A. 
Boeck; treasurer. Miss Edith E. Andrews; curator, 
Mrs. L. B. Curtis ; directors, Mrs. Margaret Muller, 
Mrs. Gavin Witherspoon, Mrs. Sidney T. Exley, 
Mrs. F. M. Lyon, and Mrs. H. G. Redwine. 

Department chairmen are: Literature, Mrs. Or- 
ville L. Routt; Browning, Mrs. H. Porter Fish; 
Shakespeare, Mrs. L. M. Cutting; English, Mrs. F. 
N. Schwartz ; child welfare. Dr. Mary Hess Brown ; 
education, Mrs. Lowell Frost; film. Miss Marjorie 
Williams ; home economics, Mrs. A. A. Hummel ; 
legislation, Mrs. Ben Goodheart; philanthropy, Mrs. 
W. H. Davies; art, Mrs. Roscoe Shrader; music, 
Mrs. J. J. Carter; drama. Miss Neely Dickson; cho- 
rus, Mrs. Maude D. Lee Skeen; Junior, Mrs. Henry 
Taylor; French, Mrs. Prescott Stevens; Spanish, Mrs. 
Arthur S. Bruce. Chairmen of standing committees 
are: Door, Mrs. Julia Morgan; entertainment, Mrs. 
A. T. Harris ; finance, Mrs. Fred Lyon ; hospitality. 
Miss Jessica Lawrence; tea-room, Mrs. Ina M. C. 
Braden; house, Mrs. C. B. Cleveland; membership, 
Mrs. Harry Hanson; parliamentarian, Mrs. Edward 
Winterer; press, Mrs. Douglas Stahl; rental, Mrs. 
Gavin Witherspoon ; federation secretary, Mrs. J. F. 
Herrington; assistant to treasurer, Mrs. Charles 
Heard ; assistant to corresponding secretary, Mrs. 
Nathan Ewing; luncheons: hostess, Mrs. C. B. Cleve- 
land; tickets. Miss Jessica B. Noble; door, Mrs. John 
Sebastian. 

Section chairmen have completed plans for a busy 
and profitable year of study. Mrs. L. M. Cutting, 
Shakespeare chairman, will open the year's work on 
Friday, October 9, at 10 a. m., when the first act of 
"Othello" will be read by members of the section. 
Miss Mary E. Hamlin will give a paper on "London 
in Shakespeare's Time." 

Mrs. H. Porter Fish, Browning chairman, will pre- 
side over the first meeting of this section on Wed- 
nesday, October 14, at 10 a. m. "The Ring and the 
Book" will be studied this year. Mrs. Hector Geiger 
will read at this meeting and will also give a com- 
prehensive analysis of this great drama. 

Mrs. F. N. Schwartz, chairman of the English 
section, announces that a course of study in English 
composition and appreciation will be started at the 
first meeting on Friday, October 30, at 10 a. m. This 
will be followed later in the j'ear by the study and 
writing of short stories and verses for which prizes 
will be offered. 

Miss Neely Dickson, drama chairman, announces 
a new study section in Modern Drama, classes to be 
held every Tuesday at 11 a. m., starting on October 



13. It is planned to make of these meetings a sort 
of clearing house for all matters pertaining to the 
theatre. An effort will be made to have the hour an 
informal one where a broader knowledge of the 
theatre may be gained, and an increased interest in 
cultured speech be stimulated. 

The first club luncheon of the year will be held 
Wednesday, October 21, when Miss Neely Dickson, 
chairman of the drama department, will preside. 

Plans are nearly completed for the Hollywood 
Flower Show to be given under the auspices of the 
club in its gardens and clubhouse on the afternoon 
and evening of October 16 and 17. Mrs. George 
Melville, general chairman, announces as her chair- 
man of committees the following: Hospitality, Mrs. 
Charles Lippincott; finance, Mrs. Frederick Stith; 
door, Mrs. Charles Wilson; listing. Miss Jessica 
Lawrence; placing, Mrs. J. W. Stoddart; publicity, 
Mrs. Douglas Stahl; decoration, Mrs. Fred Leonard; 
custodian of prizes, Mrs. A. G. Castles ; refresh- 
ments, Mrs. J. W. Morgan and Mrs. J. F. Herring- 
ton; baskets: church, Mrs. H. J. Whitley; P. T. A., 
Mrs. B. F. Maurer; school, Mrs. Albert Walker; 
soliciting flowers, Mrs. J. C. Booth; soliciting prizes, 
Mrs. George W. Melville ; building, Mrs. Eugene 
Holmes; printing, Mrs. Roy H. Cowper; Parade, 
Mrs. L. B. Curtis ; chrysanthemum salad, Mrs. Frank 
L. Hemming; life members, Mrs. E. L. Baker; flower 
songs and sentiments, Mrs. Albert Walker. 

Many very valuable prizes have been donated as 
follows: by Mary Pickford, a silver basket; Carrie 
Jacobs Bond, de luxe edition of her songs; Charles 
E. Toberraan, large Sevre vase; Feagan's, silver 
flower bowl and candlesticks; Chapwood's Studio, 
Italian Majolica urn; Taft Company, silver basket; 
G. G. Greenwood, silver vase ; Coulter's, silk art 
pillow; New York Store, rose flower boudoir lamp; 
Hollywood Athletic Club, vase; Dorothy Visju An- 
derson, large floral painting; Ambassador Hotel, sil- 
ver trophy cup; Biltmore hotel, silver basket; Christie 
hotel, Italian flower pot; George Birkel Company, 
ukelele and case; Owl Drug Company, perfumery; 
Vadd and Weaver, vanity and comb; Central Hard- 
ware, Indian pottery; Mrs. L. Frank Baum, Oz Book; 
California Furniture Company, amber Venetian vase; 
Sid Grauman, Egyptian vase; Shayne's, combination 
silver piece; Milnor's Importers, opium bowl; First 
National Bank, silver vase; Hollywood Book Store, 
French candle sticks; Innes Shoe Company, gold 
slippers and hose; Betty Bolton's, fancy basket of 
candy; Shanghai Corner, minitaure Chinese garden; 
Beckman's Fur, fur neckpiece; Parmelee-Dohrmann, 
imported vase; Cecil DeMille, blue art vase; Little's, 
framed etching; Wiley B. Allen, velour music bench 
cover; Mrs. Frank Hemming, imported vase; Elite, 
large fancy basket; Ever-Ready Drugs, perfume ato- 
mizer; Mrs. C. H. Heard, Italian vase; Peggy Rose 
Shop, lingerie; Mrs. W. H. Hay, Majolica vase; 
Packard Motor Company, silver basket; HolljTvood 
Chamber of Commerce, silver vase; J. W. Robinson 
Company, Venetian comport; Dyas and Company, 
Mah Jongg set; Paul Howard, jardiniere; Barker 
Brothers, Italian crock; Mrs. J. W. Stoddart, im- 
ported vase ; president's prize, Mrs. Charles Rich- 
mond, Rookwood vase; Robertson Company, bridge 
lamp, complete ; Miss Jessica Lawrence, $10.00 ; Mrs. 
Fred Lewis, $10.00; Alpha Floral Company, $10.00; 

(Continued on Page 8) 



OCTOBER, 1925 



Page 7 



I 



Txo^ ^w6eiiG3^ ^deii& 



5j) Mrj. Jack Vallely 



The first meeting of the Ebell Club in October 
will be a happy reunion of its members and it is to 
be a real homecoming day. After Mrs. William 
Read, the president, welcomes the members after 
their long vacation, she will present to them the new 
lot which was purchased by the directors in the 
summer and will give to them all the plans for the 
new club building which have so far been formu- 
lated. The program for the afternoon is to be given 
by one of Ebell's most talented members, Celeste 
Nellis-Ryus, pianiste, assisted by Sol Cohen, violinist. 
They will play some new French ensemble numbers 
never before heard on the coast. This will be Sol 
Cohen's first club appearance since his European 
tour. Their solos will also be of the modern school 
representing America, France and Russia. Mrs. 
Ryus has a background of many years of study and 
acquaintance with the musical masters of the world 
and her recitals before the club prove fascinating, 
as she gives personal talks about the composers. As 
a pupil of Moszkowski, who has dictated some of 
his finest composition to her, she is recognized in 
Europe as well as America as a pianiste of rare 
brilliance and artistry. 

As a pleasant ending to the afternoon, Mrs. Re^d 
and the executive board will receive the club mem- 
bers in the tea room. The custom of Ebell's of 
serving tea to its members and guests after a Mon- 
day program is a very delightful social feature. 



EBELL NOTES 

Ebell's new department of Public Affairs, Mrs. 
John Stearns Thayer, curator, is the consummation 
of a dream come true of the President, Mrs. William 
Read, and her co-workers. 

Realizing that good citizenship means active par- 
ticipation in all civic as well as national affairs, 
women more and more are seeking information on 
both sides of every question. It is to fill this need 
that the department of Public Affairs was organized. 
In -this department will be freely discussed legisla- 
tive questions, local and national; some of the un- 
derlying causes of world unrest will be studied; our 
government in its different branches will also be con- 
sidered; it is hoped to intrigue all who attend this 
new department to follow from day to day the influ- 
ence upon the world at large of certain dominant 
characters in other countries. 

The scope of each individual's world is limited in 
its boundaries only by that person's opportunities. 
In its Public Affairs department Ebell says: "The 
world is my neighbor and all men are my brothers, 
let us understand one another." 



An unusual feature of the new year book of Ebell 
which shows the club's interest in and co-operation 
with the Federation of Clubs is the publishing on its 
pages the names of the officers of the General, the 
State, and the District Federations. 

A departure from the usual club activities is to be 
the monthly evening meeting to be given for those 
who, because of business or other duties, find it im- 
possible to attend the regular meetings of the club. 
The program for October will be under the direc- 
tion of Mrs. John Stearns Thayer of the department 
of Public Affairs. The curators of the different de- 
partments will each present an evening program 
some time during the year. 

The first monthly bulletin of the club year shows a 




Mrs. Celeste Nellis Ryus 

most interesting month ahead for the club members. 
There will be twenty-two department meetings dur- 
ing October, which shows the diversity of club inter- 
ests; some of the departments are planning serious 
courses of study while others are providing delight- 
ful programs carrying out some special theme. On 
the first Monday at the regular meeting Celeste 
Nellis-Ryus, pianist, and Sol Cohen, violinist, will 
give a musical. October 12, Dr. B. S. Baumgardt, 
who has recently returned from the Balkans will 
give an illustrated lecture on Constantinople, the 
Queen of the East. October 19 Eugene O'Neill's 
play, "Beyond the Horizon," will be presented by the 
Potboilers' Theatre and on October 26, the annua! 



Page 8 



The CLUBWOMAN 



Charter Day reception will be held at which time the 
charter members of the club will be honored. A 
short program of music and dancing will be given 
in the patio by Dr. Feodor Kolin, pianist, and Little 
Yvonne, dancer. 



EBELL BOOK DEPARTMENT 

While we are most enthusiastic over the plans for 
study for next winter, these plans are as yet merely 
in our minds and sometimes it is difficult to convey 
one's mental outlines to others. 

Now through the ages and ages during which peo- 
ple have told stories, we can trace if we will the 
growth of fiction, that growth culminating in the 
novel and the short story as we know them today. 
During this time, while many literary periods were 
sterile, othrs gave birth to offspring of great origin- 
ality and genius. These offspring grew, flourished, 
matured, and with maturity were easily able to com- 
pletely change the environment which had produced 
them. 

It is our purpose to concentrate on the study of a 
few of these mighty literary children. Not that any 
age realized that it was giving a prodigy to poster- 
ity, quite the contrary. It is practically an estab- 
lished fact, that no Greek H. L. Mencken or Milesian 
William Rose Benet, waked very late one morning 
in the year 150 A. D., waked with eyes red from a 
night of reading the best seller of that year "Dinias 
and Dercyllis" by Antonius Diogenes, and announced 
with conviction, "That book will forever change the 
form of fiction. That tale marks an epoch." It is 
much more likely that as he opened, his eyes upon a 
new work day of badgering the younger generation 
because it was not as the older generation, that he 
groaned testily, "What is modern literature coming 
to anyway? Oh for the good old days of Pericles, 
literature was literature then." 

But "Dinias and Dercyllis" upset for all time the 
ancient formula for all tales, since it was the first 
love story — the first story of t^uo not one — the first 
chronicle of the "way of a man with a maid" and 
today, seventeen hundred and seventy-five years 
later the love theme is still the vital perquisite of 
a best seller. 

So the Greek Romances gave us love — Hebrew lit- 
erature gave us a philosophy, a mode of behavior — 
the short stories of the middle ages gave us humor, 
sometimes a very broad humor. Henry Seidle Canby 
says that there are two kinds of stories, those which 
can be told and those which can't and those which 
can't are usually the best. Many of the medieval 
stories couldn't be told now. Then, in the eighteenth 
century, we have the great contribution of Richardson 
and Fielding, who gave us the novel in its present 
form. 

Now, briefly, that is the plan we shall follow next 
year and we shall endeavor to show how writers of 
today get into their works the love element, philos- 
ophy or humor — whether that work be a novel by 
Michael Arlen, an auto-biography by Jim Tully, an 
essay by Christopher Morley or a poem by Edna St. 
Vincent Millay. 

That, we repeat, is our idea. Whether we can 
convey that idea to our audiences or not is, as Rud- 
yard Kipling would say, "another story." 



SILENT SINGING 

Exercises by which great singers build and restore the 
voice. Equally valuable for the health and speaking 

voice of those who do not sing, 

Mme. Irwin Kellogg 

Friday Morning Qub House, Mondays and Tliursdays. 
Res. Plione WHitney 7793 TUclier 6288 




]ltrs. George G. Hunter 

(Continued from Page 6) 
Bedford Studio, brass art basket; Van der Aker 
Jewelers, silver vase; Mrs. John F. Mead, Majolica 
basket; E. S. Brown, silver vase; Jantzen-Railsback, 
blue bowl and stand; Paulais, basket of candy; Kress 
Drug Company, Venetian Cologne bottle ; Gates, 
Crane, and Earle, silver vase; Coolidge Rare Plants, 
jardiniere; Blossom Chocolate Shop, candy; Mrs. O. 
L. Kinney, Mrs. R. B. Spencer, Mrs. W. T. B. 
Campbell, Mrs. Emma Henderson, Mrs. Lester Cox, 
Mrs. J. R. Hubbard, Mrs. E. L. Hogan, Mrs. C. F. 
Coleworthy, Mrs. Marie B. Kramer, and Mrs. F. B. 
Kent, cash. 

Mrs. Melville urges all who wish to enter exhibits 
to call her GRaiiit 9704. The Woman's Club of Hol- 
lywood extends a cordial invitation to neighboring 
communities, organizations, churches, schools and in- 
dividuals to enter exhibits in the flower show. 



GRACE ADELE FREEBEY 

Pianist and Teacher of Piano 
Studio — Friday Morning Club House 

940 So. Figueroa Street 
Phone TUcker 6288 Residence Phone 52969 



OCTOBER, 1925 



Page 9 



FRIDAY 1NlORNINeCLT7B 

IIIIIIIF!!l!Efi!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!''lllilllllllllllllllllllll!''l!!!!!!^^^^^ 

Mrs. Frederick Hickok, Press Chairman 



The costume cuts re- 
produced in this issue 
of The Clubiuoman 
are of members of the 
Friday Morning Club 
as they appeared at 
the "Fashion Show of 
Other Days" given by 
the club. The photos 
isere taken by ffitzel. 




Mrs. Mark Kelsey 



The Friday Morning Year Book is out earlier this 
year than ever before and shows much careful 
thought and research work by the junior Past Presi- 
dent, Mrs. Florence Moore Kreider. The book is 
larger, by seventeen pages, than ever before and con- 
tains a beautiful picture of the facade of the club 
house as well as one of Mrs. Christian Hartke, posed 
in the gown and cap of Mme. Severence as worn by 
Mrs. Hartke in "Ye Fashion Show of Other Days." 
A new feature in the year book is a list, compiled 
by Mrs. Frank A. Gibson, of the club members who 
have made notable contribution to the political ser- 
vice of the Nation, the State and the City of Los 
Angeles. This interesting list contains sixty-one 



names and dates back to 1912 or since sufFerage was 
granted to California Women. 

The club now has a membership of 2777 — an in- 
crease of 151 during the past year. The Redwood 
Memorial Grove will have the names of fourteen 
members of the Friday Morning Club on its tablets. 

During the vacation of the club a committee of 
women have organized and meet each day to sew for 
the needy children of Santa Barbara and many new 
garments are being sent each week to the Santa 
Barbara Woman's Club who have charge of the 
distribution. 

The first activity of the club year was the Press 
(Continued on Page 34) 



Page 10 



The CLUBWOMAN 



W6:DN6SDAY MORNIWa OWB 



w 



By Mrs. O 

The Wednesday Morning Club held the Diamond 
Jubilee celebration of California's seventy-fifth 
birthday, at the clubhouse, September 23. The drama 
section, Mrs. N. R. Schuman, director, sponsored the 
affair; luncheon being served at noon, followed by 
an afternoon of bridge, five hundred and mah jongg. 
Dr. Charles F. Lummis appeared as luncheon speak- 
er, while the Spanish atmosphere for the occasion 
was furnished by the hostesses, Mmes. Harold W. 
Bailey, John Kokom, L. Paul Zahn, Robert J. Stan 
ton, Fred K. Heller and Marion Dunn appearing 
in costume, the same theme carried out in the menu 
and decorations. Spanish dances and strollers enter- 
tained during the day. This together with a lunch- 
eon and card party given by the Shakespeare Sec- 
tion on September 11, were the last of the social gath- 
erings for the summer season. 

To begin the year's study in the Shakespeare Sec- 
tion, with one of the tragedies which has become more 
popular because of the stage presentations, has proved 
to be the best means of creating and holding the 
interest of the class. Mrs. H. E. Brett, Shakespear- 
ean instructor, has announced that "Othello" will be 
the first study, followed by a continuation of the 
English Historical Series, "King Henry VI," three 
parts, concluding the year's work with one of the 



rla D. Spray 

lighter plays. 

Mrs. N. R. Schuman, director of the drama sec- 
tion, has mapped out a systematic course of study 
for the year. Typed forms of the work will be dis- 
tributed a week in advance, in order to allow time 
for preparation. The second Wednesday of each 
month will be devoted to voice placing and conver- 
sational English ; the third Wednesday to readittg 
and discussion of one of the modern authors and 
one of his plays; the fourth Wednesday Mrs. Edward 
Dvorak, instructor, will read scenes from the play 
previously studied. The class also announce that 
they will prepare plays early in the year, which may 
be given on programs, thereby furnishing the prac- 
tical experience for those taking part, as well as the 
benefit derived from the study. 

Prof. Ralph R. Laughlin will continue as instructor 
for the Music Section, with Mrs. John Hokom, ac- 
companist. Mrs. Marion Dunn, director, states that 
an operetta to be given in costume, will be one of 
the features of the work, which will be given as an 
evening's program, during the first of the year. The 
Public Welfare and Current Event Section, under 
Mrs. Berenice A. Johnson, Parliamentary Usage and 
English Sections will follow the same order of work 
of last year. 



LOS ANGELES DISTRICT, C. F. W. C. 

Mrs. Orla D. Spray, Press Chairman 



"Conservation and Stimulation of Constructive 
Forces" is the motto for the coming year of the Los 
Angeles District, California Federation of Women's 
Clubs. 

"Each individual club member of the Los Angeles 
District has constructive forces, which are very vital 
for the stimulation of the high ideals of the work 
that women have undertaken," declared Mrs. James 
Birney Lorbeer, district president, in her words of 
greeting to her chairmen and their committee-women, 
at the luncheon on September 3rd, held at the Cham- 
ber of Commerce, the future headquarters of the 
District Federation. 

"This work should not be carried on alone by the 
officers and their committee-women, but each one 
should give of the best that they have in them," Mrs. 
Lorbeer further urges. "The departments should not 
be considered as separate departments, but only as 
units of the grand total; the officers are not sepa- 
rate, with the chairmen and the committees 'hitched- 
on,' but they are all a part of the machinery work- 
ing toward the same end, and should meet and con- 
sult together, so that each will feel that they have a 
working part in clubdom, and are a means for the 
accomplishments of the ideals for which the Federa- 
tion of Women's Clubs stand." 

R. W. Pridham, president of the Chamber of Com- 
merce, extended words of welcome, pledging the 
hearty co-operation of his organization, and remind- 
ing all that many achievements would not have been 
successfully accomplished, were it not for the wo- 
men's clubs. A large basket of flowers, a gift from 
the Chamber of Commerce, stood on the president's 
table. 

A rc'i'lition t n lorsing the bill now before Con- 
gress for the protection of watersheds, was presented 
to the board of directors for their endorsement, by 
Mrs. Walter C. Fisher, chairman of conservation of 
natural resources. Mrs. Fisher stated that there are 



certain watersheds in the San Fernando Valley en- 
tirely without fire protection which places the Los 
Angeles aqueduct in constant danger. 

Through the President's letter to the club presi- 
dents, Mrs. Lorbeer calls attention to the suggestion 
of Mrs. William Read, president of the Ebell Club, 
that splendid reciprocity results would be possible, 
if instead of the club's holding a Reciprocity Day, 
the larger clubs would invite a few presidents at a 
time to one of their regular meetings. This intimate 
contact would prove of greater value to the indi- 
vidual clubs, as they would gain a working knowl- 
edge of the other clubs under normal conditions. 
Clubs in the district are urged to order Directories 
for their officers and chairmen. Price of forty cents 
to club members. This Directory is our working 
manual, and the chairmen especially should have one, 
to become better acquainted with the Federation 
departments. 

The Radio Department, a new division of the dis- 
trict, Mrs. Harry W. Michael, chairman, is to fill a 
long felt need, and will be not only a medium of 
publicity for the Federation, but will also be of a 
high educational value to club women. Programs 
will be broadcast every Friday over KNX, from 2 
p. m. to 3 p. m. Each week a different department 
will have charge of the hour, featuring their work, 
interspersed with musical numbers by talented mem- 
bers from the clubs throughout the district. This 
will be a great help to chairmen throughout the dis- 
trict, who are not able to attend the conferences, as 
it will enable them to keep in close touch with the 
accomplishments of their department. 

Mrs. W. J. Richardson, emblem chairman, wishes 
to impress upon club members in the district the great 
significance of our emblem. That we must not look 
upon it as a piece of jewelry or an ornament, but 
that we must remember the great principle for which 
it stands — "Strength United is Stronger." The pur- 
chase of one, early in the club year, from the emblem 



OCTOBER, 1925 



Page 11 



chairman of your club, is urged. 

Child Study groups to be organized in the clubs 
of the district, is the plan of Mrs. E. M. Lazard, 
chairman of Child Welfare. A conference of this 
department was held in September, at which this 
new line of work was featured, and also there was 
a model lesson on habit formation. This line of 
study will be follow-up in a systematic course at 
monthly conferences. 

Taking her lead from the fad of the day to have 
character dolls of actress.es or famous women, dressed 
in suitable styles, setting around to lend atmosphere 
to drawing room, dining room or boudoir, Mrs. A. 
S. C. Forbes, chairman of history and landmarks, 
conceived the idea of having "Santa Barbara," stand- 
ing around our homes, hotels, clubhouses and public 
places, as a "patroness against sudden danger." To 
start the ball rolling, as the donation of the dis- 
trict board, in the interest of the restoration of old 
landmarks, allo^ved Mrs. Forbes a sum to purchase 
wax and other material to make dolls, reproductions 
of Palma Vecchio's famous painting of "Santa Bar- 
bara," the original of which hangs above the altar of 
Santa Barbara Church of Santa Maria Formosa, 
Venice, Italy. 

The subject of this painting was a beautiful lady, 
living in the thirteenth century, a martyr to the faith, 
while our beautiful city of Santa Barbara has been 
a martyr to the wrath of nature. The doll, dressed 
in her mantle of crimson, with the diadem resting 
on her golden curls, holds in her hand a scroll, on 
one side of which there is printed a history of Santa 
Barbara Mission, and on the other of the city of 
Santa Barbara, making the souvenir of educational 
value to the purchaser. Samples will be placed in 
prominent gathering places, where orders will be 
taken, to help swell the fund for our stricken city. 

Mrs. Forbes' unique idea will materially aid a 
two-fold ^ worthy cause, by enabling the California 
Federation to assist in restoring one of California's 
oldest historic landmarks, as well as furnishing em- 
ployment for the ex-service men at the Hut, who are 
making the dolls. The boys are deeply interested in 
the work and are making every effort to have each 
doll an exact reproduction of the original, as they 
feel that this is the means of them doing their 'bit.' 

The first President's Council was held at the Fri- 
day Morning Clubhouse, September 17. The pro- 
gram centered around American Citizenship fea- 
turing H. J. Stonier, of the University of Southern 
California whose subject was "Government by 
Proxy"; Mrs. Robert J. Burdette discussed "Releas- 
ing Power," and Mrs. Lillian Burkhart Goldsmith 
chairman of the Community Service, spoke on "The 
Religion of Civic Beauty." Club institute, conducted 
by Mrs. Charles S. McKelvey, parliamentarian fol- 
lowed assembly singing, lead by Miss Ruth Antoin- 
ette Sabel, chairman of music, who also had obtained 
the band of the Bov Scouts of America, for musical 
numbers during the afternoon. Time was allowed 
some of the chairmen, for a brief outline of their 
work, and Mrs. H. T. Wright, chairman of co-oper- 
ation with ex-service men and women, and her assist- 
ants, presented the work of her department in an 
appealing manner. 



HIGHLAND PARK EBELL 

Mrs. George F. Cook, Press Chairman 

A thorough renovation of Highland Park Ebell 
Clubhouse and the addition of several pleasing fea- 
tures in furnishing have produced an attractive set- 
ting for the opening breakfast which is always a 
happy event in the club calendar. 

Committees are meeting for the perfection of plani 



Branch Offices 



By C. W. REESE, 
Branch Office Supervisor 

"171 7" HEN you were away 
from home the day the 
callector called with your gas 
and electric bills; when you 
want to order gas or electric 
service discontinued here and 
begun there; when you wish 
some point about L. A. SER- 
VICE explained or investi- 
gated — - then you appreciate 
the convenience of our twelve 
branch offices maintained 
throughout the territory 
which we serve. The loca- 
tion of each office is given on 
the back of your bill. 

The men in charge of the 
branches will be glad to give 
you the same courteous atten- 
tion that you would receive 
if you called in person at our 
main Los Angeles Office — 
minus the traffic jam. 



LosAngelesGas and 
Electric Corporation 



Page 12 



The CLUBWOMAN 



and altogether a most pleasant and profitable year is 
expected. 

Tuesday, October 6, is the date for the club break- 
fast at which over 200 members will be served. 

The membership at the close of last year was nol 
far from 400 and this number will probably be 
reached this year and perhaps may go beyond it. 

Among the closing reports of last year a most 
gratifying one was that of the treasurer, Mrs. Mabel 
Foote, who reported $1556.95 in the treasury, which 
amount with $1600.00 out on interest, will clear the 
club of all indebtedness, with enough money in the 
treasury to pay oif the mortgage on the bungalow 
purchased two years ago adjacent to the clubhouse, 
and to permit the incoming president, Mrs. Hubert 
Carr, to enter into office with a clean sheet. 

Mrs. Harry Louis Stroh, president for the past 
two years, is chairman of recoprocity and programs 
in the Los Angeles District Federation of Women's 
Clubs. 

Several other women of the Club are identified 
with department work in the district. The new 
president, Mrs. Hubert Carr, was formerly chairman 
of Literature in the District. 

The various sections of Club study will continue 
this year with Mrs. Elizabeth T. Howell, as general 
Curator, with separate curators for the sections. 
Much interest has been shown in these depart- 
ments and nearly all of them have been well at- 
tended. 

The club meets every Tuesday morning and if 
there is a fifth Tuesday, an afternoon prograc. is 
held with a reception following. 

The third Tuesday in the month is devoted to 
Public Affairs and the Club is fortunate in retaining 
as head of that department Mrs. John H. Foley, the 
author of the play, "In Quest the Best," stressing 
clean newspapers. This play was produced last April 
at the clubhouse by members of the club under Mrs. 
Foley's direction and it has received commendation 
from worthy critics. 

The morning programs this year will be given 
through the chairman, Mrs. Mabel Foote and her 
committee. 



LONG BEACH EBELL 

By Mrs. Burr Brown, Press Chair?nan 

Mrs. Charles A. Wiley, the president of the Long 
Beach Ebell Club; Mrs. Sumner Davis, second vice- 
president and chairman of printing; Mrs. Earl Burns 
Miller, curator of departments, and Mrs. George Hul- 
bert Galbraith, chairman of programs, have had a 
busy summer arranging programs and getting the 
departments ready to function, but, with their plans 
all made and the year book in the hands of the 
printer, they had a few well-deserved weeks of rest 
before the club year opened. 

Towards the middle of September the chairman of 
Finance, Mrs. R. J. Booth, returned from her summer 
home in the mountains to rally her forces for the 
intensive work of the year in raising money for the 
building fund. She presided at a luncheon for the 
finance group chairmen at which plans for raising 
money were discussed, including the sale of Phil- 
harmonic tickets, which course the Ebell Club is spon- 



soring. In the weeks immediately following the lunch- 
eon, practically all the chairmen called meetings of 
their respective groups and arrangements were well 
under way by each group for some novel way of 
earning its quota, beginning promptly with the open- 
ing of the club year. 

The curator of Departments, Mrs. Earl Burns 
Miller, announces a few innovations in the depart- 
ments. One will be program meetings of the Indian 
Welfare Department, which has heretofore served the 
club merely as a committee. It is believed that con- 
siderable interest will be aroused in this department 
through speakers- on archeology and Indian lore. 
Mrs. Louis J. Gillespie, well known throughout the 
State for her interest in Indian welfare, will be the 
chairman of the department. 

An entirely new department is the Nature Study 
Department. As this goes to press, a chairman has 
not been selected, but the plan of the department is 
to specialize in the study of California birds, trees 
and kindred subjects with the assistance of authorita- 
tive speakers and the department meetings followed 
by a hike or outdoor picnic when the weather is 
propitious. 

An old department in a new form is the Play and 
PIa3'ers Department which was formerly the Drama 
Department. The club has been especially fortunate 
in having Miss Louise Hill, a new member, accept 
the chairmanship of this Department. Miss Hill is a 
graduate of the Leland Powers School of the Spoken 
"VVord and brings a wealth of experience and new 
ideas to the club. Her plan is to augment the study 
of plays by the enacting of a playlet by the members 
themselves once each month. 

The other departments will be much the same as, 
in previous years. The Art Department, with Mrs. 
F!;ank J. Born as chairman, will s^tudy the art of 
France and Spain in cooperation with the Travel 
Department under the chairmanship of Mrs. J. B. 
Green. The Better English Department will be again 
under the chairmanship of Mrs. Charles F. Ross; 
the Current Topics and Book Review under Mrs. 
William M. Fulton; Needlecraft Department, Mrs. 
W. J. Burgin; Parliamentary Law, Mrs. E. E. Hoag- 
land ; Shakespeare Study Department, Mrs. Wallter 
S. Cutler, and the Junior Department, Mrs. Nathan 
Burson. 

Mrs. Miller's slogan for the year for the depart- 
ments is "The Furtherance of Friendship and Cul- 
ture." 



PHILANTHROPY AND CIVICS 
CLUB 

.... Mrs. Herbert Denitz, Press Chairman 

The Philanthropy and Civics Club will usher in 
its new club year on Thursday, October 1, with the 
greatest program of activities ever scheduled in its 
annals. During the past month, the organization was 
active in the philanthropic and social service work 
of the city, and with the coming of a new year, the 
many chairmen and officers will greatly further the 
constructive work begun by the past regime. Lillian 
Burkhardt Goldsmith will serve her seventh con- 
secutive year as president of the club, while the other 
officers will be Mrs. Joseph B. Bonhaus, first vice- 



San Francisco Santa Barbara i Los Angeles Oakland 

GOVERNMENT, MUNICIPAL, DISTRICT AND CORPORATION BONDS 



San Diego 



OCTOBER. 1925 



Page 13 



president; Mrs. Daniel Thomas, second vice-presi- 
dent; Mrs. E. C. Pyle, third vice-president; Mrs. 
John B. Good, recording secretary; Mrs. Albert R. 
Rennick, corresponding secretary; Miss Mary E. 
Bailey, financial secretary; Mrs. W. R. Updegraff, 
treasurer, and Mrs. Joseph" B. Bonhaus, federation 
secretary. 

Directors of the club are Mesdames William My- 
ron Keck, David E. Henry, Henry Gattman, C. M. 
Bower, C. Janet Esten, Harvey L. Laughlin, George 
C. Ryno, Car! E. Day, and Paul Binks. 

Chairman of standing committees who have been 
appointed by the president are as follows: 

Progr.^m: Mrs. Joseph Bonhaus. 

Schoi-.^rship: Mrs. Harry M. Weir, chairman, and 
Mesdames Oscar A. Trippet, Roy Jones and William 
Myron Keck. 

Sewing: Mrs. S. K. Merril, chairman, and Mes- 
dames G. M. Bowers and C. M. Buckler. 

L.AYETTEs: Mrs. Henry Gattman, chairman, and 
Mrs. P. F. Hartman. 

Who-so-ever Fcxd: Mrs. Henry Gattman, chair- 
man, and Mesdames Florence M. Hampton, D. E. 
Henry and Miss Julia F. Pettey. 

Luncheon Tickets: Mrs. Harvey Laughlin and 
Mrs. C. F. Bergman. 

Decoratings: Mrs. E. C. Bartlett and Mrs. G. H. 
Carroll. 

House .■\nd Garden: Mrs. John Wissmath and Mrs. 
C. Janet Esten. 

Sawtelle Veteran Visiting: Mrs. G. H. Carroll 
and S. G. Ross. 

Ho-jPITALity: Mrs. A. C. Magnus, chairman, and 
Mesdames Lillian Morse, Sanford L. Porter, Walter 
Albert, Cecil Carter S;evens, Percy R. Wilding, L. C. 
Zimmerman, W. P. Fisher, M. Lela Hill, A. E. Carl- 
son, J. G. Lynch, Roy Southworth and Florence M. 
Hampton. 



Parliamentarian: Mrs. E. C. Pyle. 

Membership: Mrs. W. R. Updegraff, chairman, 
and Mesdames L. C. Zimmerman and David L. 
Gordon. 

Luncheons: Mrs. Charles Sezbert and Mrs. A. R. 
Pennick. 

Quilting: Mrs. Martha Barry Eyre. 

Knitting: Mrs. Ida Tucker Reese. 

Social Service: Mrs. Sanford L. Porter. 

Historian: Mrs. Louise R. Waites. 

Librarian: Mrs. Cecil Carter Stevens. 

Press: Mrs. Herbert S. Denitz. 

Executive Clerk: Miss Mary A. Bailey. 

SANTA MONICA BAY 
WOMAN'S CLUB 

By Florence Cowan, Press Chairman 

To start a thing and not finish it is generally con- 
sidered a bad state of affairs, but to begin a thing 
that proves so big and interesting and beautiful that 
the neighbors take a hand and help to finish it up. 
that is another matter. That has been the story of 
the California Dahlia Show held September 16, 17 and 
18 at the Santa Monica Bay Woman's clubhouse. 
When the club, led by several enthusiastic spirits, de- 
cided to sponsor a dahlia show, it was done in the 
hope of stimulating the culture of these beautiful 
flowers that grow so generously at the beach and 
they have met with success beyond their expectations. 
Flower lovers took up the work with enthusiasm 
and fifty or more gardens in Santa Monica have 
been gorgeous with the splendid flowers. Interest 
and rivilary were keen; city officials saw the civic 
possibilities, business firms saw advertisings, and the 
project started in a small way became a community 
enterprise. As this is written the show is in progress 



f . W. Hotimson Co. 

Order Noiiif 

Personal Engraved 
Christmas Cards 

THE selection of Personal Engraved Christmas Greeting Cards at Robin- 
sons' is a real pleasure, affording great satisfaction. Distinctive designs, 
interesting color effects, novel envelope linings, combined with skillful engraving, 
contribute to the effectiveness of the new cards. 

Many of them are designs exclusive to Robinson's, meeting the requirements 
of good taste, appropriateness of the season and individuality. 

Large No-rcross masterpiece folders with navie and greet- 
ing hand lettei-ed on each folder, priced as high as six hundred 
dollars for one hundred cards. 

It is advisable that one's choice be made early while the 
assortment is complete and varied. Prices begin as low as 
$8 for 100 cards. 



Page 14 



The CLUBWOMAN 



and the clubhouse is filled with dahlias of every 
lovely shade. Fifty silver cups have been offered as 
prizes, one to be awarded the producer of a new 
dahlia deemed worthy of receiving the name Santa 
Monica. 

In general the prospect is bright for the club year 
in the Santa Monica Bay Club. At a meeting of 
heads of departments with the program chairman, 
Miss Mae Armstrong, recently, work in all sections 
was outlined. These will include for the year. Public 
Affairs, the chairman of which, Mrs. C. M. Waters, 
has plans for making the section function as a valu- 
able asset in the community; Parliamentary Law, 
with the incomparable Mrs. D. G. Stephens in 
charge; Literature, under the leadership of Mrs. 
A. C. Barke, formerly press chairman of the club; 
Arts and Crafts, Mrs. W. W. Dumm and Miss Tess 
Razelle as joint chairman; Music and Drama, Mrs. 
J. F. Jarvis and Mrs. Louis Jackson, respectively, 
chairmen, both of whom served with success last 
year; the Travel Section, Mrs. George Huber, chair- 
man ; Recreation and Aesthetic Dancing, in which 
will be included Folk Dancing, according to the 
chairman, Mrs. Priscilla Drake, and the Child Wel- 
fare Section, which has been efficiently managed for 
several years by Mrs. William Mattern and now led 
by Mrs. Clementine Campiglia, will extend its serv- 
ices to include a prenatal class, where demonstra- 
tions in the care of babies as well as lectures will 
be given. This suggestion of what the different de- 
partments have to offer, coupled with escellent pro- 
grams for the Monday meetings make the openin!^ 
day of the club, October 5, an eagerly awaited event 
among Santa Monica women. 



LINCOLN STUDY CLUB 

By Margaret Clausen, Press Chairman 
The Lincoln Study Club of Los Angeles assembled 
for its fall opening at the new clubrooms in the 
Women's LTniversity Club house with an afternoon 
tea Tuesday, September 29. Mrs. Homer Waldo 
Spiers, president, opened the session with an address 
of welcome, and the program included renditions by 
Phoebe James, soprano; readings by Marie McAllis- 
ter, and dances by Dorothy Spiers. 

The fall term of study formally opens the first 
Tuesday in October with an art class under the direc- 
tion of C. J. Barwick. Opera study will feature the 
second Tuesday of October, the opera "Martha" be- 
ing the theme. Marie McAllister will present the 
synopsis, with Gladys Blackwell Pickering, soprano; 
A. Watson McAllister, tenor, and Bob Cheaton, bari- 
tone, in the leading roles. 

The third Tuesday in October will be devoted to 
parliamentary law, with Mrs. Charles McKelvy as 
instructor, and with English under instruction of Miss 
Fania Kendig. 

Literature will be the theme of the fourth Tues- 
day session, Mrs. Vallely being in charge of this 
program. 



WOMAN'S CLUB OF 
COACHELLA VALLEY 

By Mrs. L. R. Hayward, Corresponding Secretary 
The past year and the first year of the Woman's 
Club of Coachella Valley was a gratifying success, 
the year closing with a membership of one hundred. 
The club was organizeti to be a service and a pleas- 
ure to the women of the entire Coachella Valley, and 
under the progressive leadership of our first presi- 
dent, Mrs. W. E. Yant, the club opened its first year 
with a reception to the ladies of the valley, and 
throughout the y?ar members and quests enjoyed 



many beneficial meetings; a building fund was start- 
ed, a music section organized, and many community 
services rendered. It was with regret that our first, 
president, Mrs. Yant, resigned before the close of the 
year to make her home in Los Angeles. The first 
vice-president, Mrs. E. P. Carr, became our inspir- 
ing president for the last few months. 

Tlie closing meeting of the year the husbands of 
members were honor guests of the club, with the pub- 
lic invited to hear Miss Helen Sayer in a lecture-song 
program of Indian lore and idealized Indian melo- 
dies. 

In the early summer the new president, Mrs. Carr, 
entertained the board of directors at her home, and a 
most delightful day was spent in an informal busi- 
ness session, officers and chairmen of every section 
co-operating in perfecting plans for the coming year. 

The program committee has the year book com- 
pleted and edited ready for distribution to an enthu- 
siastic membership. 



THE BUENA PARK WOMAN'S 
CLUB 

By Mrs. L. T. IVilsey, President 

During the summer months the officers and com- 
mittees of the Buena Park Woman's Club have been 
busy formulating^ plans for the winter activities and 
arranging the programs for the new club year. 

I found after our last meeting in June that the 
new chairman of the Ways and Means Committee 
felt that owing to added home duties, she could 
not undertake the work. With our limited member- 
ship it was hard to find someone to take her place, 
so the executive board decided to try a new plan 
this year. The members of the executive board will 
plan the activities for keeping the treasury supplied 
with cash. Most of the board members had pet 
schemes they would like to work out, so we are hop- 
ing, with the co-operation of the other members of 
the club, to be able to raise a nice sum to help with 
the remodeling of our club building. 

On September 1 we held our Third Annual Orangt 
County Dahlia Show. It was a success in every way. 
The committee was especially pleased with the num- 
ber of ne^v exhibitors, the better quality of the flow- 
ers, and the artistic arrangement of displays. We 
were fortunate to have Mr. F. C. Mulkey, one of 
the prominent dahlia growers of the Southland, to 
help with the judging; T. D. Robertson, florist of 
FuUerton, and C. L. McComber, one of our local 
boosters, were the other judges. 

Having received a request from the Orange County 
Fair Association to make an exhibit of our dahlias 
at the county fair in Santa Ana, September 22 to 26, 
we are now busy arranging for that. This will be 
a community exhibit with the co-operation of the 
entire community. 

After our summer vacation, the Buena Park Wom- 
an's Club will resume meetings on October 1 and 
we are looking forward to a pleasant and success- 
ful year in 1925 and 1926, and send best wishes for 
the same to all other clubs. 



COMMUNITY CLUB OF SANTA 
MARIA 

The Community Club of Santa Maria is one of 
the really worthwhile women's organizations in Santa 
Barbara county, concerning itself with only those 
matters pertinent to the welfare of the citizens of 
this country. There are times in which such mat- 
ters have called for a discussion of European poll- 
cies and which have been conducted by chairmen 
having. such work in charge. 



OCTOBER, 1925 



Page /5 



The new club year started off most auspiciously 
with a luncheon to the officers by Mrs. William S. 
Litzenberg, the new president, who takes the chair 
with years of experience in various church and civic 
work to her credit. 

Mrs. C. W. Rahbar, the retiring president, is 
also a club woman of extensive experience, having 
served as president of the Salt Lake City House- 
wives' League, an organization of several hundred 
members. 

Mrs. Walter Smith, vice-president, and Mrs. 
George C. Smith, corresponding secretary, each have 
had considerable newspaper and magazine experience, 
while Mrs. A. R. Kohler, recording secretary, and 
Mrs. Frank L. Breed, treasurer, make an aggrega- 
tion of officers who will carry the club through an- 
other successful and eventful year. 

Chairmen have been appointed for the following 
departments: International Relations, Mrs. F. L. 
Breed; American Citizenship, Mrs. H. A. Steir; 
Home Economics, Mrs. M. M. Collins; Motion Pic- 
tures, Mrs. George C. Smith; Child Welfare, Mrs. 
C. W. Rahbar; Co-operation with ex-Service Men 
and Women, and Book Section, Mrs. Walter L. Smith. 
Three Junior Auxiliaries are also sponsored by the 
club. 



KATE TUPPER GALPIN 
SHAKESPEARE CLUB 

By Mrs. Elizahrt/i C. Fisher, Press Chairman 

On Wednesday, October 14, at 10:30 a. m., at 
the Women's University Club, 943 South Hoover 
street, the Kate Tupper Galpin Shakespeare Club 
will begin its twenty-fourth year of existence. 

The attachment of the dramatist to the "great out- 
of-doors" will be the subject of the October meeting. 

Shakespeare loved the forests. What he would 
have thought of a desert country we cannot tell — he 
was not much of a traveler and never saw a desert — 
but surely he would have appreciated the springing 
grass and flowers after a wet winter and the blue 
shadows on the brown hills in a dry season. 

At the October meeting Mrs. Leroy Bailey will 
read excerpts from different plays dealing with the 
poet's fancy for the "woods" and each member of 
the club will be expected to give a quotation bringing 
out his love for trees or flowers. 



GLEASON'S 
PARLIAMENTARY DIGEST 

The Digest was written by a woman who has 
been for seven years the National Superintendent of 
Parliamentary Law for the Woman's Christian 
Temperance Union; she was for four years Par- 
liamentarian, of the Los Angeles District Federa- 
tion of Women's Clubs, and is now Parliamen- 
tarian for seven different organizations and has 
had much experience in teaching and presiding. 
Mrs. Gleason knows the needs of our women and 
wrote the Digest, to be used as a text as well as 
reference book, for the purpose of making it easier 
for our women to study and understand parlia- 
mentary procedure. The Digest is based upon 
"Robert's Rules of Order Revised." Revised Edi- 
tion, $2.00. 

If your book-store does not carry the Digest, 
send direct to the author. 

MRS. I. W. GLEASON 

1 110 West 30th Street Los Angeles, Calif. 







"One oClocVjJaturdayJ''' 



l*a«iBw<=~r 






Page 16 



The CLUBWOMAN 



Mrs. Opal Dempster will give a practical talk 
on reforestation as it is going on in our own country. 

The Galpin Shakespeare Study Class will hold its 
first meeting for the year on October 15, and, as 
during last year, will be under the leadership of 
Mr. Frayne Williams and will meet at the home of 
Mrs. W. E. Silverwood, 122 North Vendome street. 



OXNARD .MONDAY CLUB 

By Lillie R. Hokin, Press Chairman 

The Oxnard (Ventura County, Los Angeles Dis- 
trict) Monday Club opened its 1925-26 season with a 
luncheon and business meeting at the Community 
Center clubrooms on September 14. The new presi- 
dent, Mrs. Nina Diefenbach, is a veteran clubwoman 
of the county, having served two years as president 
of this club several years ago, and later as president 
of the Ventura County Federation. She has insti- 
tuted sections for music, drama, fine arts, interna- 
tional relations, Shakespeare and literature, good- 
fellowship and athletics, and appointed chairmen 
for all the departments of federation work. 

An innovation is the rotating membership commit- 
tee, members being relieved and others appointed as 
they secure new club members. A program on Sep- 
tember 28 will commemorate the Jubilee year. The 
social service committee will sponsor a charity ball 
on October 3. Other outstanding events the year 
promises are a children's Christmas party, produc- 
tion of a musical comedy, an evening of plays, a 
Shakespeare recital, etc. Each section will put on 
one general program for the club. 



MONTEBELLO WOMAN'S 
CLUB 

Mabel E. Kennedy, Press Chairman 

The Montebello Woman's Club, under the leader- 
ship of its building president, Mrs. Jane M. Schaack, 
is looking forward with great interest and enthusiasm 
to the beginning of the club year October 1, and also 
to January 1, when the club will hold open house 
in its new home. 

Mrs. Schaack and the building committee, Mrs. 
J. D. Mintier, chairman, Mrs. N. J. Brown, Mrs. 
Glen Smith, Mrs. B. L. Stevenson and Mrs. J. H. 
Prescott, are giving their minds and hearts in an 
effort to make our dream of a clubhouse come true. 

The building will have a large assembly room, 
reception room, committee rooms, arched porch over- 
looking the Montebello hills, kitchen and caretaker[s 
apartment. Later the club will add a large audi- 
torium. 

Mrs. N. J. Brown, vice-president and program 
chairman, together with her committee, has given 
much time during vacation to preparing a program 



which promises many interesting afternoons. The 
History and Landmarks chairman, Mrs. George E. 
Wilfert, has scheduled John Steven McGroarty and 
Mrs. A. S. C. Forbs for January 7 and March 18, 
respectively. The American Home and International 
Relations chairmen have engaged speakers for other 
program dates. 

On October 1, 2 and 3 the club is co-operating with 
the Chamber of Commerce of Montebello in sponsor- 
ing a Flower Show for the benefit of the furnishing 
fund. 

Mrs. L. T. Williams, art chairman, will have an 
exhibit of her own work at the Flower Show. 



ARTESIA WOMAN'S CLUB 

By Laura Watts Shelton, Secretary 

The members of the Artesia Woman's Club are 
promised a most enjoyable and profitable year under 
the direction of Mrs. L E. Lee, president. 

Although the regular monthly meetings were not 
held during the summer months, much has been ac- 
complished and plans have been made for many 
future activities. 

The Philanthropic Committee, with Mrs. George 
Gaines, chairman, has been quite successful in rais- 
ing funds for Santa Barbara, and they have also 
filled all local charity calls. 

Our club debt will be materially lessened this year, 
as the Ways and Means Committee is a group of 
enthusiastic, industrious members. Mrs. C. B. Scott 
is chairman, and her efforts are never futile. 

Mrs. Verne Curl, social chairman, is planning 
three outstanding social events for the year. This 
method proved very satisfactory last year. 

Mrs. George Frampton, program chairman, has 
spent much time and effort, and as a result, programs 
of vital interest to all are to be given. 

A word of tribute must be given Mrs. C. H. 
Griffen, past president, who helps and inspires all. 
Of Mrs. Griffen this can truthfully be said: 

"To know her is to love her, and love her but 
forever." 



MISSION ACRES WOMAN'S 
CLUB 

The following efficient officers will steer our little 
boat on the sea of clubdom this year: 

President, Mrs. Lou Andrews; vice-president, Mrs. 
Joseph B. Daley; recording secretary, Mrs. G. H. 
Will; corresponding secretary, Mrs. Calvin Texter; 
treasurer, Mrs. M. C. Dickey; federation secretary, 
Mrs. A. E. Hartman; auditor, Mrs. W. B. Harris; 
directors, Mrs. H. Kubler, Mrs. George Tilden. 

The club opens October 9 with a patriotic luncheon. 



Standard dry goods of one quality only — the best. 
New fashions daily augment our assortments. 




SEVENTH STREET AT OLIVE 



OCTOBER, 1925 



Page 17 



LAGUNA BEACH WOMAN'S 
CLUB 

By Marion Munson Forrest, Press Chairman 

"Something doing all the time," is an apt phrase 
for a vivid and clear-cut description of the Woman's 
Club of Laguna Beach. Composed of women who 
have been world travelers, who are noted artists and 
sculptors, writers and teachers, the personnel of the 
Laguna Beach Club is such that little time is wasted 
on non-essentials. 

The club has sponsored artistic, civic and social 
movements of value to the community. In the future 
it will be a still greater power for good, as new 
ideas are being developed in board meetings to help 
in furthering club participation in the life of the 
town. 

Financially in good conditions, the club stands 
ready to help all Federation work and has main- 
tained a high standard in its program matter. It 
is also preparing plans for a new home and for a 
public fountain done by the great sculptor, Julia 
Bracken Wendt. 



WOMAN'S CLUB OF FALL-' 
BROOK 

By Lillian Eastman, Correspondinff Secretary 

The luncheon and meeting of the Fallbrook Wom- 
an's Saturday Afternoon Club on September 5 marked 
the opening of the social season for this vicinity. A 
dainty luncheon served at 12 o'clock on artistically 
decorated tables, was followed by an interesting pro- 
gram, Mrs. Perkins, the new president, giving an 
outline of her plans for the year's work and the 
various committees reporting their plans, all of which 
gave the club members a very good idea of what an 
interesting year this is going to be. 

At 3 o'clock the first moving picture matinee of 
the season was given, many club members staying to 
enjoy the pictures which were very good, a feature, 
travelogue and comedy being shown. 

About twenty new members were taken into the 
club at this meeting. 

On Friday, September 11, a smart donation tea 
was given at the clubhouse and about $25 raised to 
send to the Santa Barbara Relief Fund. 

The Fallbrook Woman's Saturday Afternoon Club 
will have a variety of good programs this year with 
several fine speakers and the members are anticipat- 
ing a better year than ever. 



MINERVA LIBRARY CLUB 

It can hardly be said that the officers of the 
Minerva Club enjoyed a vacation this summer, as 
three big events were staged during these months, 
which were benefits for the clubhouse building fund. 

In June the Los Angeles Chamber Music Quintet 
gave a splendid concert in our high school audi- 
torium. Then again, in midsummer, a cooking school 
was sponsored, and when it was over cakes were 
sold. 

On August 15 the annual dahlia show was held. 
This is one of the big outstanding features accom- 
plished by our club each year. There is a percepti- 
ble growth in the quantity and quality of blooms 
entered, in the number of trophies donated, and in 
the door receipts at each succeeding show. 

The year's work was opened with a luncheon at 
the Santa Maria Inn on Friday, September 4. Mrs. 
A. W. Slayden, vice-president of the Los Angeles Dis- 
trict, was our honored guest, and she gave a splen- 
did talk on federation extension. 



OWENSMOUTH WOMAN'S 
CLUB 

By Mrs. F. A. Orton, Press Chairman 
The Owensmouth Woman's Club, a lively, working 
club, one of the baker's dozen women's clubs in the 
San Fernando Valley, is making interesting plans 
for a banner year which will open with a luncheon 
given by board members and chairmen of standing 
committees on Wednesday, October 7. A full line 
of committees has been appointed and a fine pro- 
gram for the meetings of the first quarter arranged, 
the most notable of which will be November 17, 
when Mrs. J. B. Lorbeer will address the club. 

Thoroughly imbued with the spirit of "Hearths and 
Home," last year's slogan, the Owensmouth Woman's 
Club of 100 members functioned beautifuljy. It is 
truly a homeloving community, having no apartment 
hotels, and one is impressed with the "homey" at- 
mosphere surrounding the dwellings. "East, West — 
Home's the Best" 'in Owensmouth. 

"By their fruits" are loyal clubwomen known in 
this community, and in a delightful way to the 
Florence Crittenton Home, Owensmouth Woman's 
Club's pet charity. Mrs. Julia Franz, president, and 
Mrs. F. L. Cary, chairman of Philanthropy, collected 
a quantity of home-canned fruit given by the club 
members and delivered it to the home recently. 



THE AMERICAN UNIVERSITY 
STUDY CLUB 

By Mrs. B. E. Wilson, Press Chairman 
After a two months' vacation the members of the 
American University Club are planning a joyful re- 
union for the club year work announcements at the 




'Once Every Year!" 



The Ville's 32nd 

Anniversary Sale 

'October 5 to 17, 1925 

A Sale bringing 
Values of unusual 
import . . . un- 
usual even with 
former "Anniver- 
sary" Value-stand- 
ards as preced- 
ents. . . . 

After months of preparation — 
these "Once Every Year" Savings 
for every woman — October 5 to 17. 




FAber sEVENXH'^^s^'^r OMvt 2020 

B.H.DYASCO. 



Page 18 



The CLUBWOMAN 



home of the president, Mrs. J. B. Greene, 932 Valen- 
cia street, Los Angeles. 

A 12 o'clock luncheon will be served a few invited 
guests and members of the club, a timely move to in- 
crease our membership. 

The past year's work included a study of the Con- 
stitution of the United States, lives of some of the 
great leaders of early Colonial days, and the Amer- 
ican government, which • we will continue for the 
present. 

Much credit for the unity and attainment of the 
past is due the leadership of our able and progress- 
ive president, Mrs. Greene, who at the June elec- 
tion was unanimously elected for the second year. 

Our officers for the coming year are as follows: 

President, Mrs. J. B. Green, Los Angeles ; vice- 
president, Mrs. A. K. Freeland, Inglewood ; secretary- 
treasurer, Mrs. Robert McClellan, Watts; music 
chairman, Mrs. N. J. Young, Los Angeles ; federation 
secretary, Mrs. Freeland, Inglewood ; press chairman, 
Mrs. B. E. Wilson, Los Angeles. 



SANTA BARBARA COUNTY 
NURSES' ASSOCIATION 

By Florence Tisdel, Secretary 
The Santa Barbara County Nurses' Association, 
District No. 11, resumed their regular monthly meet- 
ings on September 2, meeting at Recreation Center. 
Dr. Aleck Harrison, the recently appointed County 
Health Officer, gave us a very interesting talk on 
the development and ideals of Public Health Work, 
reminding us of the opportunity and responsibility 
of the nursing profession in furthering the work. 

A very enjoyable meeting was held during July 
at the Visiting Nurses' Health Camp. After a picnic 
supper Miss Alice Bagley talked to us on the public 
health work of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Co. 
We are looking forward to a good year and hope 
that soon we may be able to announce the programs 
for the winter months. Suggestions from the mem- 
bers will'be very gladly received. 



PLACENTIA ROUND TABLE 

By Mrs. S. C. Netanes, Press Chairman 
The Placentia Round Table will hold its opening 
meeting on Wednesday, October 7, at 12:30 with a 
covered dish luncheon, the outgoing officers being 
the hostesses. The members are looking forward to 
a most delightful year under the efficient leadership 
of Mrs. J. Charles Thamer. The new programs 
just off the press are filled with fine treats and show 
a world of keen thought on the part of the program 
committee. Mrs. Herbert Sullivan, Mrs. George E. 
Myers and Mrs. Clarence Haiber. Besides the fine 
afternoon programs, they have planned a number of 
evening meetings, at which the husbands are made 
welcome. The foreword on the new programs taken 
from one of Dr. Mariana Bertola's talks, voices the 
sentiment of the club members: "Let us help our- 
selves and others to 'carry on' for the Federation, 
to show an unswerving loyalty to principle, an un- 
conquerable purpose to tell the truth, an unfaltering 
devotion to duty, not paralyzed by fear of conse- 
quences ; proof against all blandishment and beauti- 
fully loyal to the Federation." 



SAN GABRIEL WOMAN'S CLUB 

By Ellen M. Willard, Press Chairman 
The San Gabriel Woman's Club makes its self- 
introductory bow to this club center. 

Like all women's clubs its main object is help to 
the community where it lives ; and it begins to feel 



like the grown-up who, having passed its childhood, 
realizes that its best work is before it. 

But, each member is saying, "Whyf" "Why do I 
come to this club? Aside from what I may do for 
others, what does it bring to ME?" And the answer 
is embodied in the prefacing words and the mes- 
sage held in the following verse read at a recent 
section meeting: 

This uplifting of the soul; this rebuilding of tired 
hopes ; this renewal of energy vihich blots out weari- 
ness or discouragement and makes us new again — 
this is my answer to the "WHY?" 



ST. PAUL'S CATHEDRAL 

Oh, mighty mass of stone ! More than mere stone 

art thou. 
Thou art the hopes, the aspiration, of a soul 
Put into visible shape to please the eyes that see, 
To rest the tired heart, and bring forgetfulness 
Of life's small worries, and its hurts and tears. 
We stand beneath thy arches, touch thy columns high. 
Vision thy lights and colors, trace thy mighty curves, 
And we are lifted far above our little woes. 
We feel — we know not how — that here we stand 

within 
A temple built by God Himself within the MAN. 
Our troubles become small. Life grows as vast as 

this — 
The visioned dream of some inspiring soul 
Who knows that life is large, is sweet, is true. 
Thoughts writ in changeless stone thou art, to stay 

with us. 
That we may read, and never lose, thy majesty. 
We leave thy shadowed portals in a silence still 

and deep. 
And take thy teachings with us to resurrect our souls. 



L. W. SlockweD Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Stockwell Never 
Stretch Mattress 



Makes Any Bed 
A Better Bed 



Loa Angelea 



California 



OCTOBER, 1925 



Page 19 



THE COMMUNITY WOMAN'S 
CLUB OF MICHILLINDA 

By Mrs. M. D. Roth, Press Chairman 

A reception for old, new and prospective members 
will open the season of the Community Woman's Club 
of Michillinda. This get-acquainted meeting will 
be held at the home of the president emeritus, Mrs. 
C. S. Rodgers, Wednesday, September 30, from 2 
till 5. 

The first regular meeting will take place Wednes- 
day, October 7, at the clubhouse. 

Because of the widespread territory covered by 
this club, the membership has been divided into 
neighborhood groups with a captain over each and 
a captain general over all. These groups or circles 
are to provide a "ways and means" entertainment 
once a month and also serve the club luncheons dur- 
ing the year. 

A Harvest Home Festival will be held early in 
November with a cake contest under the direction 
of Mrs. Kate Brew Vaughn. 



UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN 
CALIFORNIA WOMEN'S CLUB 

By Mrs. Thomas B. Stoviell 
The University of Southern California Women's 
Club will hold its first meeting in the new Women's 
Residence Hall, on the afternoon of September 23. 
It is a reception and dedication and reciprocity occa- 
sion all in one, and club members generally are cor- 
dially invited. President R. B. von KleinSmid will 
give greetings, and Mrs. von KleinSmid, aided by 
her efficient assistants, will be the gracious hostess. 
Her work as president of the club cannot be too 
highly praised. 

The Year-Book just issued shows a fine program 
for the year. The October meeting will be "Mother's 
Day," with an address by the new dean of women, 
Dr. Mary Sinclair Crawford. In November there 
will be a luncheon for the benefit of the Woman's 
Building, and the annual luncheon for the benefit 
of the Scholarship Loan Fund will take place in 
January. 



LADIES' COMMUNITY CLUB 
OF BETTERAVIA 

By Miss Ruth Freeman, Corresponding Secretary 

The Ladies' Community Club of Betteravia was 
organized for social and charitable purposes — to help 
the non-sectarian church and Sunday school. 

Each year we have a community Xmas tree and 
give each child a present and candy. We also give 
the children an Easter egg hunt and a Halloween 
party. 

During the year we give ice cream, cake, pie and 
candy sales. Had an ice cream and cake sale on 
August 21 and made $35.00. 

In April we paid our quota of $1.00 per member 
to the Redwood Grove Memorial Fund. In Sep- 
tember we gave $1.00 per member to the Santa 
Barbara relief fund. 

The club meets on the second Thursday of each 
month. The first hour is the business meeting and 
then the hostess of the day takes charge of the social 
hour. 



NEWHALL WOMAN'S CLUB 

By Miss Minnie E. Daivson, Press Chairman 
The first meeting, after the vacation season, of 

the Newhall Women's Club, was held Wednesday, 

September 9, at their clubhouse. 

Many visitors were present and several new mem- 




BARKER 
BR.O S. 

COMPLETE FURNISHERS OF SUCCESSFUL HOMES 
'BROADWAY BETWEEN SeVeNTH AND EIGHTH 



Page 20 



The CLUBWOMAN 



Directory of California Products 

For the convenience of the seventy thousand clubwomen of California and 
the many others who have enthusiastically subscribed to the campaign of the 
w^omen's clubs to promote in every possible way the use by Californians of Cali- 
fornia products, The Clubw^oman, mouthpiece of the campaign, presents the fol- 
lowing partial classified list of California products. In planning their shopping, 
clubw^omen will find this list handy reference guide to w^hat to order in carry- 
ing out their pledge to buy California-made goods w^herever possible. 



AWNINGS 

Acme Tent and Awning Co. — Canopies. 
4069 Mission Road, Los Angeles. Tele- 
phone CApitol 7380. 

BUILDING MATERIALS 

Doors-Sash-Screens — Veneered Doors, High 
Grade Interior Finish — Pacific Door & 
Sash Co. 

Hardwood Floor Finishers and Contractors 
National Floor Co., Los Angeles. 

Mirrors, Sand, Plaster, Vitrolite — Raphael 
Glass Co., Los Angeles. 

Pioneer Paper Co., Manufacturers of Roof- 
ings. 

Sash-Doors-Hardwoods-Hardware — Frank 
Graves Sash, Door and Mill Co. 

CLOTHING 

"Bentsknit," "Ribstitched," Bathing Suits 
and Sw^eaters — Pacific Knitting Mills, Los 
Angeles. 

"Summers Quality" outing and w^ork cloth- 
ing for men and boys — Summers Mfg. 
Co., Inc. 

CARPET CLEANING 

City Steam Carpet Cleaning Works, John 
Bloeser, Main 0430. New Rugs. 

FOODS 
Biscuits, crackers, etc. — Pacific Coast Bis- 
cuit Co., Los Angeles. 

Capitol Products, flour, etc. — Capitol Mill- 
ing Co., Los Angeles. 

Carson-Baruch Baking Co., Inc., Wholesale 
Bakers, 3545 Pasadena Ave., Los Ange- 
les. Capitol 5 770. 

Christopher Co., L. J. — Quality Ice Cream 
and Candies. 



Faultless Bread "Let your daily bread be 

Faultless." Faultless Bread Bakery, Los 
Angeles. 

Globe "Al" Flour, Macaroni Products and 
Cereals — Globe Grain and Milling Co., 
Los Angeles. 

Iris Brand "Over 200 Wonderful Things to 
Eat" — Distributed by Haas, Baruch & 
Co., Los Angeles. 

Morola — Nut Margarine, Morris & Co., Los 
Angeles. 

Newmark's Pure High Grade Coffee — 
FAMOUS FOR FLAVOR. 

Olson's Bread, "O So Good" — Olson Bak- 
ing Co., Los Angeles. 

Puritas Vacuum-packed Coffee — a Los An- 
geles product, at most grocers. 

Miss Saylor's, Inc., Unusual Chocolates, 
6752 Venice Blvd., Culver City. 

FURNITURE AND HOUSE FITTINGS 

Barker Bros., 716-738 South Broadway — 
Complete Furnishers of Successful Homes 
— Our "Own Make" and "Mastermade" 
Upholstered Furniture and Hand-tailored, 
"individualized" Mattresses and Box 
Springs. 

Inglewood Furniture — Inglewood Manufac- 
turing Co., Inglewood, Cal. 

Kling Furniture — Kling Manufacturing Co., 
Los Angeles. 

Kwality Pillows, etc. — Kwality Feather Co., 
Los Angeles. 

Los Angeles Can Co. — Manufacturers of 
Tin Cans for all purposes. 

Sanotuf Mattress, furniture — Roberti Bros., 
Los Angeles. 

Stockwell Neverstretch Mattress — L. W. 
Stockwell Co., Los Angeles. 



OCTOBER, 1925 



Page 21 



Directory of California Products 



Upholstered Furniture — Soronow's Furni- 
ture Manufacturing Co., Los Angeles. 

Window Shades — Window Shade Products 
Company, 910 East Fourth St., Los An- 
geles. 

"Zenith" Upholstered Furniture and Mat- 
tresses — Bailey-Schmitz Co., Los An- 
geles. 

Citizens Independent Ice & Cold Storage 
Co., 6 1 0-620 South Raymond Ave., Pasa- 
dena, California. Phone Colorado 30. 

GARDEN EQUIPMENT 

"Rainmaker" Hadden Automatic Sprinkler 
Co., Los Angeles. 



GASOLINE AND MOTOR OIL 
Ventura Gasoline "California's Best," Ven- 
tura Motor Oil (Paraffin-Base) — Ventura 
Refining Co., Los Angeles. 

HEATING SYSTEMS 
Gleewood Furnaces — Foss & Jones, Pasa- 
dena. 

MOTOR TRUCKS 
Moreland Motor Truck Co., Los Angeles. 

STSORAGE BATTERIES 
Hobbs Storage Batteries, Hobbs Storage 
Battery Corp., Los Angeles. 

WATER HEATERS 
De Luxe and Supreme Gas Water Heaters 
— General Water Heater Corp., 1601 
Compton Ave. 



bers joined. After a short business meeting, a fine 
program appropriate to Admission Day was given, 
which was in charge of Mrs. Armantha Thibeaudeau. 
Refreshments were served and all enjoyed a social 
hour. 



COLLEGE WOMEN'S CLUB OF 
LONG BEACH 

By Grace E. Irmn, Press Chairman 

The coming year promises to be the most success- 
ful year, so far, in the life of the College Women's 
Club of Long Beach. 

At the meeting of the executive board, called by 
Mrs. O. P. Bell, president, general plans for the 
year's work were formulated. 

A special campaign is to be waged for new mem- 
bers by Miss Ruth McKinley, chairman of the mem- 
bership committee. Miss McKinley says there are 
many college women in Long Beach who have not 
as yet affiliated themselves with the club and that 
her committee is going to endeavor to reach many 
of these, during October, through the local press or 
personal contact. She presented the names of five 
college women making application for membership, 
at the first meeting, and hopes it will be necessary 
to call a special meeting of the executive board to 
act upon many other applicants for membership be- 
fore the October meeting of the club. 

The executive board regrets that, owing to the 
resignation of Miss Grace Richardson from chair- 
manship of the Big Sister Department, the club 
was not able to take an active part in the Girls' 
Week activities the last of September. 

The program committee, through its chairman, Mrs. 
Gertrude Johnson Fisher, reported briefly the nature 
of bookings which could be obtained by the club in 
the way of entertainers, for the regular meetings. 
The attraction offered by Mr. Wilford and his clav- 
ilux proved most attractive to the board, provided 
the club could finance the affair. Among those being 
considered by the committee are Ruth Draper, with 
her monologues; Ed Langley, motion picture painter; 
Countess Catherine Karolye; Mayor Vivian Gilbert, 
Jim Tully, Dr. J. J. Myers and Paul Harvey, lec- 
turers; also many musical attractions, including Alma 
Real and her Spanish orchestra. 

The first regular meeting of the club, occurring 
on October 6, is to be a formal dinner followed by 
a musical program and social hour. The club is 



fortunate in being able to secure as a meeting place 
rooms at the new Young Woman's Christian Asso- 
ciation building for some of its regular meetings. 
Being a club without its own home has presented many 
problems to the housing committee, but the Y. W., 
with its wonderful equipment and attractive, spacious 
rooms, is suited to accommodate almost any type 
of entertainment. 

Although the College Woman's Club does not 
sponsor definite sections, the board is in hopes that 
they can offer to the members a short course in in- 
terior decoration. This course consists of five les- 
sons, given for a nominal sum, by Mr. Richard H. 
Allen, of Berkeley, California. Several classes may 
be organized, enrolling from eight to twelve mem- 
bers, each section to meet at various homes. Such 
practical criticisms of actual surroundings and help- 
ful suggestions are made by Mr. Allen that the 
board feels they will be justified in offering this 
course to the College Women of Long Beach. 



CURRENT EVENTS CLUB OF 
ONTARIO 

By Mrs. W. M. Garley, Press Chairman 
The program of the Current Events Club of On- 
tario for the coming year will follow out the plans 
outlined by the State Federation of Women's Clubs, 
according to a decision made recently by the board 
of directors of the club. 

Talented speakers sent out from the State Federa- 
tion, including state secretaries and chairmen, will 
address the meetings, speaking upon their special 
subjects. The club is to be the hostess club for San 
Bernardino County on November 10, wken the State 
President, Dr. Mariana Bertola, who is to come 
south for the district convention, will be the guest 
of honor and speaker. 

Several prominent educators and lecturers have 



Los Angeles : sn-siss. Broadway 

Pasadena : Colorado al Uu Robin 

Apparel for Women, Misses and Juniors 



Page 22 



The CLUBWOMAN 




Outdoor Pageants in the Heautijiil Gardens are a Feature of Life at 
Elliott School for Girls 



also been engaged, among them William D. Saltiel. 
assistant corporation counsel for Chicago, who will 
speak December 22 on "Michael Brown, Politician." 

The first activity of the year was the opening re- 
ception held September 29 at the clubhouse in West 
. B street. A musical program was given, with 
Archie Moore, soloist, assisted by Miss Marguerite 
Johnson, violinist. 

Officers of the club are: Mrs. Ross P. Garbutt, 
president; Mrs. B. F. Warmer, first vice-president; 
Mrs. A. M. de Berard, second vice-president; Mrs. 
Sidney Smith, corresponding secretary; Mrs. Charles 
Walker, recording secretary; Mrs. S. J. Bentley, 
treasurer. 

The club is active in local aifairs and in philan- 
thropic work. 



SCHOOL NOTES 

By Jean Kentle 
A delightful al fresco breakfast was served Sat- 
urday morning to the faculty and friends of Ken- 
wood Hall by Miss Ruby Mildred King and Miss 
Grace Baylor Bobbitt, the principals. The school 



gardens with the outdoor grill, summer houses and 
pergolas, offered an ideal setting. The new members 
of the faculty were welcomed and the morning passed 
all too quickly. 

By arrangment with the Pacific Electric, special 
transportation is being provided for day students at 
Girls' Collegiate School, at Glendora. Students liv- 
ing in Los Angeles, Hollywood, Pasadena, and near- 
by towns will find this specially routed car a great 
convenience. 

Miss Frederica deLaguna and Miss Jessica Smith 
Vance, principals of Westlake School for Girls, an- 
nounce the addition to the Junior College faculty of 
Miss Mary Howe, of Vassar, mathematics, and Miss 
May Glenn Phillips, Emerson College, Boston, expres- 
sion, completing the list. The Alumnae Tea will be 
held October 7 when the faculty will welcome the new 
students as well as former ones^ Many of the 
alumnae are expected. Miss Jean Hunter, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Guy Hunter, a graduate of 
Westlake School for Girls, has been honored by be- 
ing chosen president of the sophomore class at Mills 
College. Miss Helen Funnell, another graduate at- 
tending Mills, was awarded the English prize. 



CAROLINE DUNCAN 

Studio Open October I 
Classes in Public Speaking and all forms of 

Dramatic Art. 
1622 Crenshaw Boulevard EMpire 63 60 



WESTLAKE SCHOOL 

FOR GIRLS 

Resident and Day School 
333 S. Westmoreland Ave. Los Angelea 



SECRETARIAL 
COACHING 

For cultured people desiring personal attention 
Refined, harmonious surroundings. All Secretarial 
subjects. Enter at any time. Management,' Mrs. 
Frank Rutherford. 711 S. Vermont Ave. FI 1763. 



KENWOOD HALL 

Resident and day school for girls. Sub-primary 
through High School. Spanish, French, Expres- 
sion. Dancing included in regular tuition. 675 
S. Vermont Ave., Los Angeles. WAshington 16.12. 



OCTOBER, 1925 



Page 23 



SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 

As a result of personal inquiry The Clubwoman takes pleasure in commending to the patron- 
age of members of The California Federation of Women's Clubs the schools whose announce- 
ments appear in The Clubwoman. 



(§irls!' CoUegiatE ^c!)ooI 

Removal to the Country 

Thirty -fourth year. Glendora Foothills, over- 
looking San Gabriel Valley. Fifty acre estate, 
— orange groves, woodlands, canyons. New 
buildings Italian type. Ail sports; saddle 
horses. * 

OUTDOOR LIFE A REALITY 
Accredited. Seventh grade to College entrance; 
also, General, Special and Post-Graduate 
courses. 

1008 West Adams Street, Los Angeles. Miss 
Parsons and Miss Dennen, Principals. 

Cumnock ^cftool 

Thirty-First Year 
School of Expression, Academy, Junior School 

Complete courses In 
Vocal Interpretation of Art 

Literature Public Speaking 

Literary Appreciation Journalism 

Story-Telling Story Writing 

Voice and Diction Dramatic Art 

Aesthetic Dancing 

HELEN A. BROOKS. Director 
5353 West Third Street 
GRanite 3253 
GR anite 33 53 Los Angeles 



University of Southern California 

Bulletins with full description of 

courses on application 

Address Registrar 

University of Southern California 
35th and University Ave. Los Angeles 



ELLIOTT SCHOOL 

FOR GIRLS 

Residence and Day School. Sub-Primary 
through Eleventh Grade. Ideal Home 
Life. Character Building. Superior Edu- 
cational Advantages. Out-Door Classes. 

MARTHA COLLINS WEAVER, Principal, 
Gramercy Place at Pico Blvd., L03 Angeles 



"The Coming JVest Point of the West" 

San Diego Army & Navy 
Academy 

The Academy enjoys the highest Scholastic rat- 
ing of the Univ. of Calif. — "Division A." It is 
un'der Government supervision. It emphasizes 
Christian Character Training. Address for infor- 
rtiation Col. Thos. A. Davis, Pres. Pacific Beach. 
Calif. 



illarlborougfi ^cfjool for iritis: 

5029 W. 3rd St. Los Angele. 

Boarding and Day School 

Accredited to Eastern and Western 

Colleges 

36th Term— 1925. 
Ada S. Blake, A. B., Principal 

PAGE MILITARY ACADEMY 

A BIG SCHOOL FOR LITTLE BOYS 

The largest of its class In America. Everything adapted 
to meet tlie needs of the smaller boy. Five fireproof 
buildings; seven-acre campus; seventeen resident teachers. 
Here a boy is taught self-reliance. Through military 
training he acquires habits of exactness, the spirit o( 
team work and co-operation and also energy and Initia- 
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Page 24 



The CLUBWOMAN 



THE PROFESSIONAL 
WOMEN'S CLUB 

By M. T. Maynard, Press Chairman 

This club began its year the last Monday in Sep- 
tember with a program discussing the new City 
Charter. G. Gordon Whitnall, director of City Plan- 
ning, was the speaker. 

The club is a dinner club and the meetings for 
the year will probably be held at the Women's Ath- 
letic Club. 

Membership in this club is limited to Lawyers, 
Dentists, Physicians and Doctors of Philosophy. 

The officers for the coming year are: 

Mila Tupper Maynard, president; Dr. Dorothea 
Moore, vice-president; Miss Florence M. Bischoif, 
secretary. 

Last year the club enjoyed programs by each of 
membership who were authors of "best sellers," Dr. 
Jackson and Dr. Peters. 

This year it is hoped that we shall hear from 
Dr. Van Waters, another club author. 



BELLFLOWER WOMAN'S CLUB 

By Mrs. J. M. Hammond, Press Chairman 
The Bellflower Woman's Club began the year's 
work October 2. The meeting followed a 1 o'clock 
luncheon. The new officers for the year are: Mrs. 
Thomas Powell, president; Miss Vivian Crandall, 
first vice-president; Mrs. S. M. Newman, second 
vice-president; Mrs. Ethel Nussels, secretary; Miss 
Mary Polling, corresponding secretary and treasurer; 
Mrs. Floyd Downing, Federation secretary; Mrs. 
Horace Cordon, parliamentarian; Mrs. Thome, 
chairman ways and means; Mrs. John Sims, literary 
chairman; Mrs.' Burlingame, music chairman; Mrs. 
Orla Jeansen, conservation chairman; Mrs. Zula 
Utterback, drama chairman; Mrs. William Kramer, 
education chairman; Mrs. J. M. Hammond, press 
chairman; directors, Mrs. Ethel Nussels, chairman; 
Mrs. Floy Downing, secretary; Mrs. Parker, Mrs. 
Tatem and Mrs. Russell. 

The October meetings will be business meetings. 
November 6 will be I o'clock luncheon, followed by 
a musical program under the direction of Mrs. Bur- 
lingame. November 20 will be under the direction 
of Mrs. Orla Jeansen, conservation chairman. The 
first meeting in December will be under the direc- 
tion of Mrs. Sims, literary chairman, following a 1 
o'clock luncheon. The last December meeting will 
be under the direction of Mrs. Corder, chairman of 
the Bible section. 



CALIFORNIA HISTORY AND 
LANDMARKS STUDY CLUB 

By Mrs. Fred G. Norton, Corresponding Secretary 
The California History and Landmark Study Club 




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organized for the purpose of studying California 
History and the Perpetuation of Landmarks, a Uni- 
versity Extension Course, as well as Current Events. 
It convenes the first and third Tuesdays of each 
month at the home of the president, Mrs. A. X. Wil- 
mot. Membership is necessarily limited to twenty- 
five because of meeting at a private home. The dif- 
ferent departments are: Conservation of Our Natu- 
ral Resources, Mrs. W. D. Foster, chairman; Legis- 
lation, Mrs. H. M. Boehme ; Press and Publicity, 
Mrs. W. V. Burton ; Federation Extension, Mrs. 
S. E. Hamilton; University Extension, Miss Susan 
Alice Judd ; History and Landmarks, Mrs. A. X. 
Wilraot. 

Papers and talks are given on the lesson assign- 
ment by one or more members at each meeting. 
The text-book used is one of the best authorities on 
early day history, supplemented by other works. A 
hostess is appointed for each meeting who serves re- 
freshments, giving a talk on their history or produc- 
tion. Occasionally a dinner or luncheon is given. 



WOMAN'S CIVIC CLUB 
PISMO BEACH 

By Edna M. Quinn 
The Woman's Civic Club of Pismo Beach is in 
its third year, being organized on Washington's 
birthday, 1923. There are two meetings each month. 
First Thursday being business meeting, at which some 
time is spent in parliamentary study. Third Thurs- 
day is social, talent composed entirely of members. 
Meetings were held first at the member's homes, 
later at Hotel Wave and for the past year at the 
school auditorium. The enthusiasm and progress ex- 
pressed by the members have resulted in the pur- 
chase of three lots on the main street and a site 
in the residential part on which a new clubhouse is 
to be erected. Money for this and other purposes 
is raised by food sales, suppers, card parties, hope 
chests, etc., all provided by members of the club. 
Each year, on February 22, a birthday party of a 
patriotic nature is given to the club members' fam- 
ilies and friends. Plans for the proposed new club- 
house is next in line of new business. The aim and 
object of the club is to provide entertainment and 
civic education for its members and to work co- 
operatively with other local associations always for 
the culture, comfort, education and good of the 
Beach City. 

SIERRA MADRE WOMAN'S 
CLUB 

By Mrs. F. H. White, Press Chairman 

Much of the work of the club year was incorpo- 
rated in the valedictory address of the retiring presi- 




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OCTOBER, 1925 



Page 25 



ident, Mrs. Samuel E. Stark. 

The club identified itself with the various phases 
of community life in a most happy and consistent 
fashion; dances for light feet, lectures for thinkers, 
instructions for the novice in citizenship, and numer- 
ous luncheons and teas. 

The first of two most outstanding events was the 
ninth wistaria fete held in the grounds of Mrs. H. F. 
Fennel of Caster avenue. 

No register was kept in 1925, but in 1924 25,000 
visitors registered from forty-four states, nine Cana- 
dian provinces, and thirteen foreign countries. It 
is not too much to say that the energy and unfailing 
courtesy of Mrs. Fennel to a great degree insured 
success of the undertaking. 

An Arcadian Festival, the second of these events, 
was presented in the lovely gardens of Mrs. George 
F. Roberts, West Grandview avenue, and was in 
every respect a real classic. With Greek legends as 
a foundation, Mrs. J. Glenwood Jones, director ot 
the club's dramatic section, built up and presented 
the play of four scenes. The costumes were designed 
by Mrs. S. C. Scantlebur^; the music was presented 
by Mrs. G. B. Morgridge. The ability of Mrs. 
Jones as a director leaves little to be desired and 
her discrimination and rare talents gave to the public 
an unusual treat in this classic presentation. 

The club feels that the season just opening has 
much in store for its members and its friends. The 
president. Miss Ruth Klemme, brings youth, energy 
and enthusiasm, inspiring her co-workers with the 
feeling that indeed all things are possible. 



to co-operate each day during Child Welfare Week. 
We are very proud to be the sponsoring organiza- 
tion of a thriving Boy Scout movement in Haw- 
thorne. 



UNIVERSITY BOOK CLUB 

On August 20, members of the University Book 
Club and their friends enjoyed a delightful luncheon 
and card party at the home of Mrs. S. M. Whinery. 
An admission fee of 50 cents was charged, the pro- 
ceeds being for the benefit of the work done for the 
Needlework Guild, one of the philanthropies in 
which the club takes great interest. A number of 
little garments were on exhibition to show what the 
committee of this section have already accomplished. 

The first meeting of the new club year will open 
with a social hour and welcome to the president and 
past presidents. It will be held Tuesday, October 13, 
at 10 o'clock, in the University Branch Library. 

The chairmen of the various departments for the 
year 1925-1926 are: 

Art — Mrs. Lelia Honnor. Child Welfare — Mrs. 
A. G. Wilde. Community Service — Miss Nellie 
Weston. Conservation — Mrs. E. P. Campbell. Mo- 
tion Pictures — Mrs. C. F. Bliven. Literature — Mr^. 
Richardson. 



WOMAN'S CLUB OF 
HAWTHORNE 

By Mrs. Leak Bratton, Press Chairman 

The board of directors of the Woman's Club of 
Hawthorne have been unusually active during the 
summer owing to the recent incorporation of the 
club, and the organizing of new sections. 

The club had its first regular meeting of the year 
September 1, with a luncheon preceding the meeting. 
The recently organized Junior Auxiliary, under the 
advisory board, Mrs. Mattie Hemingway, chairman 
assisted in serving the luncheon. Mrs. J. B. Lorbeer, 
as a guest of honor, gave an address on "What the 
Federation Means to the Community Club and to 
the Individual Woman." 

The Social Service Section had a surprise for thL- 
club in the form of a large and beautiful flag. 
Earlier in the year they presented the club with 
dishes and table linen. 

The P. T. A. and the Woman's Club are planning 



WOMAN'S IMPROVEMENT 
CLUB OF CORONA 

By Lillian J. Lewis, Press Chairman 

The Woman's Improvement Club of Corona "points 
with pride" to its silver jubilee, celebrated almost 
two years ago in its attractive and practical club- 
house, now free from debt. 

The club is a civic organization, and its work 
speaks for itself. It was the first woman's club in 
Riverside County to organize for Red Cross work, 
so if not "first in peace" it was certainly first "in 
war" work. 

The club has three sections. The Music Section 
meets the first Monday of each month, beginning 
with November; curator, Mrs. George E. Snidecar. 
At the first meeting a Chopin program will be given, 
in charge of Mrs. E. Farnham Damon, and the last 
one in May will be devoted to French music. 

The Literary Section, under the able leadership of 
Mrs. T. Richmond, is primarily for study, and is 
responsible for one club program each year. 

The latest is the Garden Section; Mrs. Rose Wil- 
kins, chairman. It meets at the homes of members 
the first Wednesday of each month at 9 a. m. Its 
aim is to study gardening and flowers for an "all 
the year round" garden, and to encourage by precept 
and example the improvement of yards and gardens. 
all over town. Its chrysanthemum show in November 
and spring flower show in May are worth traveling; 
far to see. The section also decorates the club home 
for all meetings. 

The program committee, Mrs. C. Gully, chairman, 



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Page 26 



The CLUBWOMAN 



has planned a very attractive year, combining ex- 
cellent musical talent and practical talks by worth- 
while speakers and readers. A Carnival of Nations 
fashion show and garden party are included. 

With Mrs. Fred E. Snidecar as president, the club 
looks forward to a very profitable and enjoyable 
year. Its membership is over two hundred. 



THE LOS ANGELES TUESDAY 
MORNING CLUB 

Twenty-five members and friends of the Los An- 
geles Tuesday Morning Club met in Hollenbeck Park 
recently, for thir annual picnic. 

Four ladies from the Hollenbeck Home were guests 
of honor for the day. Luncheon was served in the 
boathouse. Games were played during the after- 
noon, in which everyone of the party enjoyed a happy 
time. 

The Tuesday Morning Club is a group of enthu- 
siastic women, organized for social and philanthropic 
service. 

During the past year the club has salvaged or re- 
made 266 garments, and sent them to needy organ- 
izations. Also disbursements of seventy-five dollars, 
while gifts of supplies and fruit were sent to the 
Children's Ward of the General Hospital each month. 



NORWALK WOMAN'S CLUB 

By Dorothy M. Meade, Corresponding Secretary 
Again we gather our number together to throw 

ourselves with even more enthusiasm into the great 

work that our great country is demanding of its 

womanhood. 

It is our intention to take an active part in the 

conferences and conventions, and to co-operate in 




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every possible way with the Federation. 

We are vitally interested in the great questions 
now -confronting our Women's Clubs. When our 
women get behind a movment we push it through. 

It is up to each and every one of us to make our 
country a better one in which to live, and we can 
do this only by lessening our crimes, enlightening 
our people, and beautifying our cities and towns. 

Let me take this opportunity to extend a cordial 
invitation to our friends to attend the entertain- 
ment of the Norwalk Woman's Club, on October 16, 
at which a beautifully filled hope chest will be 
raffled. 



NEPTUNIAN CLUB 

By Maude C. Withers, Press Chairman 

Like most of our sister clubs, the Neptunian has 
had a busy vacation time giving card parties, dances 
and a most unique "Jiggs" dinner, for which Mr. 
C. E. Jenkins, husband of our ways and means chair- 
man, made some very clever signs of Maggie and 
Jiggs. 

We are now beginning work on our annual bazaar 
to be held December 4 and 5 in our club room. 

The program committee is lining up a year's study 
on things Californian, Authors, Composers, Flowers, 
Birds, etc., and we hope to secure some interesting 
speakers. 

The club does not grow very fast in numbers, 
but we have plenty of ambition and are going to 
bend every effort to clear the building so we may 
be able to devote our entire time to making the 
Neptunian a club worth while. 



LOMPOC ALPHA LITERARY 
AND IMPROVEMENT CLUB 

By Mrs. Dale H. Laubly, Press Chairman 

Our club year opened September 3 and brought 
out a large gathering of members enthusiastic with 
interest in the work to be undertaken this year. 
Despite the fact of a three months' vacation period, 
the club sponsored the Annual Dahlia and Flower 
Show in August, which was pronounced the most 
successful ever undertaken here. Last April we 



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OCTOBER, 1925 



Page 27 



held our first spring Flower Show which was also 
most encouraging in its results. 

The program for the coming year plans studies of 
a wide range of subjects. Musical numbers are al- 
ways an important part of our meetings. The an- 
nual supper and social evening for members and 
escorts will be held shortly and this is the one bij; 
social time of the year. The bazaar, another annua! 
event, is dated for the latter part of November and 
the members are already diligently working for its 
success. The proceeds are added to the Community 
Club House fund. To add the spice of life we will 
put on a jinx party and frolic at one of our meet- 
ings in the near future. 



"NO, NO, NANETTE" 
OPENED SEPTEMBER 28th 
AT BILTMORE THEATRE 

Edward D. Smith, who is bringing this popu- 
lar musical show back to Los Angeles, will pre- 
sent the same cast, chorus and production at the 
Biltmore, startiuig Monday evening, September 
28th, that played for seventeen record breaking 
weeks at the Mason last spring. 

Mr. Smith was induced to arrange for the re- 
turn engagement by the overwhelming popular 
demand. During the voting contest conducted 
at the Mason Theatre, to determine the respec- 
tive popularity of "Lady Be Good" and "No, No, 
Nanette," the two Smith musical shows, over 
100,000 play patrons signified their desire to see 
"Nanette" again. It is a well known fact that 
this musical comedy left here long before its 
popularity was exhausted. The box office tak- 
ings for the final week were the largest of the 
entire engagement and special matinees had to be 
given daily to accommodate the crowds. Previous 
bookings, however, forced Mr. Smith to send the 



show to San Francisco, where it duplicated its. 
local triumph, and now the thousands who want 
to see "Nanette" again, and the thousands more 
who have not yet enjoyed this snappy enter- 
tainment, will be able to laugh at "Jimmy" and 
"Nanette" and hum with the orchestra, the catchy 
rhythms "I Want To Be Happy" and "Tea for 
Two." 



"LADY BE GOOD" LIKE 
TENNYSONS' BROOK 

"Lady Be Good," the tantalizing musical attrac- 
tion of Edward D. Smith, at the Mason, is estab- 
lishing new records. Like the famous brook of 
Tennj^son's poem, it "goes on" — maybe not for-, 
ever, for it must eventually give way to other 
and newer shows — but certainly long enough to 
give all in Los Angeles a chance to see it. 

For dancing, with joy and abandon and clever- 
ness, "Lady Be Good" need bow to no show in 
the world. Its chorus is highl}' trainM, and nightly 
draws round after round of applause. And then 
there is Kitty and Ted Doner, who are as 
talented and fast a pair of dancers as can be found. 

But dancing is only one of the attractions of 
this fast-moving production. Its music is well 
known and widely played, particularly the two 
"hit" numbers, "Lady Be Good" and "Fascinat- 
ing Rhythm." 

And the plot! Most musical shows make the 
plot a minor affair. But in "Lady Be Good," the 
plot can't be a minor affair. It's too unique and 
fun-provoking. The difficulties of the very self- 
confident lawyer, as played by T. Roy Barnes, and 
penniless but game girl and brother, as played by 
Kitty and Ted Doner, are worth following. 

Included in the cast are Ernest Wood, Hal Van 
Renssalaer, Edith Griffith, Margaret Cullen Lan- 
dis, Bernice Hough, Rose Doner and Charles 
Cunningham. 



TRUSTWORTHY FIRMS 



It is with pleasure that THE CLUBWOMAN recommends to the patronage of the Fed- 
eration membership the Nurseries and Florists whose announcements appear on this page. 



NEW BULB CATALOGUE 

for 1924-25 now ready for distribution. It 
is free and a post card or telephone call 
will bring it immediately. 

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Established 1906 

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Telephone Main 3530 

LOS ANGELES CALIFORNIA 


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Headquarters for Farm and Garden 

Ornamental Plants, Shrubs and Trees 

WINSEL-GIBBS SEED CO. 

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Main Store, 2 1 1 S. Main St. 

Phone VAndike 9532 

Nursery Yard Forty-ninth and Main 


Flower Shop Fourth St. 
224 West Fourth St. Los Angeles, Cal. 



Page 28 



The CLUBWOMAN 



WOMEN'S TWENTIETH 
CENTURY CLUB 

By Mrs. Kyle D. Palmer 

As fall approaches and the opening of the club 
year draws near, chairmen of the various sections 
of the Women's Twentieth Century Cliib feel keenly 
the responsibilities accorded them by their president, 
Mrs. Rollin L. McNitt. Those whose plans for the 
coming year were not mapped out during the sum- 
mer are spnding busy days perfecting programs so 
that valuable time need not be wasted in organiza- 
tion after the official opening of the club, October 8. 

I suppose that the interest of the greatest num- 
ber is centered in the bi-monthly programs. The 
names of the program chairmen, Mrs. Harold Ide 
Cruzan and her committee of six, Mrs. McNitt, Mrs. 
A. G. Reily, Mrs. Mary Fisk, Mrs. A. R. Rose, Mrs. 
Roy Parkinson, and Miss Abbie Smith, are sufficient 
guarantee of the quality of the entertainment and 
the instruction to be offered for the year. A most 
auspicious beginning for an interesting year is prom- 
ised for the first meeting. Charles Wakefield Cad- 
man will make his final appearance before he de- 
parts for the East to produce his opera. He will 
be assisted by Margaret Messer Morris and will be 
introduced by Mrs. Gertrude Rose. 

The Drama and Literature Section, under Mrs. 
A. G. Reily, offers much of interest. She has ar- 
ranged for a series of lectures and three plays are to 
be produced. One, a Greek drama, will be presented 
in the Eagle Rock-Occidental Greek Theater bowl. 
Mrs. Reily is assisted by Mrs. Walter Mann, vice- 
chairman; Mrs. Elgie Lowry Fischer, Mrs. H. G. 
Shearin, Mrs. Fred Lang and Miss Caroline M. Roe. 

Mrs. L. E. Hammond entertained the officers of 
her music section at a charmingly arranged luncheon 
during the summer and worked out in careful de- 
tail plans for three concerts to be given during the 
year. The first, an evening of old-fashioned songs, 
will be presented December 3. It is to be a cos- 
tume affair. The chorus meets every Wednesday 
morning under the direction of Hugo Kirchoffer and 
is open to non-members. 

Mrs. Mary Fisk, who conducted a delightful "trip 
around the world" last year in her study section, 
has mapped out an interesting program of book re- 
views and current events for this year, but will sub- 



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mit her ideas to the president and to the members 
of the section before plans can be completed. 

Mrs. Abigail O. Sheariff will conduct the Bible 
section; Mrs. C. W. Young, who has not yet re- 
turned from Berkeley where she spent the summer, 
will have charge of the history and land-marks sec- 
tion; Mrs. Alice Dirks, who has been appointed to 
represent the Chamber of Commerce on problems 
dealing with women in the State of California and is 
a member of the California Development Associa- 
tion, will have charge of civic betterment section; 
Miss Fanny Bailey, parliamentary law; Mary Marsh 
Buss, art; and two of the most important of all — 
child welfare, Mrs. B. F. Hersom, and scholarship, 
Mrs. Sherrill Osborne. Able workers all. Much 
credit is due Mrs. McNitt for the discrimination she 
has exercised in gathering these leaders together 
"who can be depended upon to promote movements 
looking toward the betterment of life." 



POINSETTIA CLUB OF 
S ATI COY 

By Airs. }V. C. Schneider, Press Chairman 
Members of the Poinsettia Club were happy to 
gather again September 9 for their first meeting after 
vacation. Among the reports since the last meeting 
was that of the work accomplished by the club mem- 
bers for the benefit of the Big Sisters League. 

The usual method of raising money for this worthy 
cause, namely providing a home for homeless babies 
of the county, has been to give a benefit party of 
some sort, but this time, in June, with two good live 
women as heads of committees, we started out to 
canvass the community and were very highly grati- 
fied with results, which totaled $343. 

Poinsettia Club is also proud that two of her mem- 
bers, Mrs. H. F. Clark and Mrs. J. M. Sharp, will 
be among those honored October 8 when all clubs 
of the county meet to do honor to all past officers 
of the federation. 



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Page 29 



WOMAN'S CLUB OF DOWNEY 

By Miss Judith McKellar, Press Chairman 

Wednesday, September 16, marked the opening 
date of the Woman's Club of Downey for 1925-26. 
This first meeting was designated as "Press Day," 
all arrangements being made by the press commit- 
tee. A 1 o'clock luncheon was served and the dis- 
trict press chairman, Mrs. Orla D. Spray, and the 
club editors were special guests. A musical pro- 
gram was arranged by the music chairman, Mrs. 
A. L. Harchelrode. 

On Monday, September 14, the officers for the 
coming year were installed by the state parliamen- 
tarian, Mrs. Charles H. McKelvey. The district 
vice-president, Mrs. William Walter Slayden, was a 
guest. A luncheon was served to the visiting officers, 
the board of directors, officers, and advisory board, 
by the president, Mrs. Lillian B. Robinson, in the 
clubhouse. The installation of the officers was un- 
avoidably postponed until near the opening date. 

The club is beginning the year's work with en- 
thusiasm and eagerness to carry out the splendid 
program arranged by the committee with Mrs. E. B. 
Martin, chairman, which we feel sure will make 
the year's work a success. 

The club has been busy during the summer months 
serving luncheons and banquets to the different civic 
organizations of the town, the money to be used to- 
wards furnishing the clubhouse. These activities are 
mainly due to the enthusiasm and energy of the pres- 
ident, Mrs. Lillian Robinson, who never tires of any 
activity that promotes the interest of the club. 

The following corps of officers will serve the club 
the coming year: President, Mrs. Lillian B. Robin- 
son; first vice-president, Mrs. A. J. Copass ; second 
vice-president, Mrs. E. B. Martin; recording sec- 
retary, Mrs. A. L. Harchelrode; corresponding sec- 
retary, Mrs. T. B. Gibson; treasurer, Mr?. J. M. 



Reeves; financial secretary, Mrs. John Galloway; 
federation secretary, Mrs. Mary Lee Rives; parlia- 
mentarian, Mrs. W. C. Springer; board of directors, 
Mrs. Lillian B. Robinson, Mrs. A. J. Copass, Mrs. 
A. L. Harchelrode, Mrs. F. F. Otto, Mrs. N. Jacob- 
son, Mrs. J. M. Reeves, Mrs. T. N. Roberts, Mrs. 
John Galloway and Mrs. E. B. Martin. 



PACIFIC BEACH READING 
CLUB 

By Mrs. Lucy ffoodiuard. Press Representative 
The Pacific Beach Reading Club is looking for- 
ward to a year of much interest and benefit. In ac- 
cordance with the wishes of our county president, 
Miss Seaman, we are stressing two main subjects, 
International Relations and the World Court. With 
that in view, we are looking forward to a talk on 
one of these from Miss Seaman, also from others on 
the Panama Canal, History of the Smaller Countries 
of Europe, and The Hague Tribunal. An innova- 
tion this coming year is the organizing of three de- 
partments — Drama, Arts and Crafts and Child Wel- 
fare In addition to these we have standing com- 
mittees on Civics, Music, Social, Emergency, Press 
and Courtesy. We have a membership of sixty-five 
and our meetings are held every first and third 
Thursdays from June to September in our own club- 
house. 



THE WOMEN'S CIVIC LEAGUE 
OF NEWPORT BEACH 

By Mrs. Flora Beatly, Recording Secretary 
Under the able leadership of Mrs. A. J. Garfield, 
president, the Woman's Civic League of Newport 
Beach, accomplished many pleasant as well as profit- 
able undertakings in the years which closed last 



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Handicaps To Skin and Hair 

of the Hard Alkali fVater in 

This Country. 

3C is the Modern, Conven- 
ient City Equivalent To 
Putting Out a fVash Tub To 
Catch Rain Water For a 
Shampoo. 







COMFORT 



Also Mean 

CLEANLINESS 



You Can Buy 3C At These 

Places— 

LOS ANGELES 

A. 6c O. 

Broadway Department Store 

The May Co. 

HOLLYWOOD 

Carty Bros. 

FLINTRIDGE 

Flintridge Grocery Co. 

BEVERLY HILLS 

R. P. O'Connor 

PASADENA 

F. C. Nash Co. 

The Model Grocery 

LONG BEACH 

The Wall Co. 

RIVERSIDE 

C. F. Elder 

Alfred M. Lewis 

Sweet Grocery Co. 



CHARM 



If you will use 3C in the water whenever you wash, your friends from l:he East can no longer 
say "This water is dreadfully hard on your skin, isn't it, my dear?" 

It is a perfect water softener and can be used with your favorite soap for bath or shampoo. 
A little in a glass of water absolutely cleans your rings. 

You Can Buy 3C At These Places 



SAN BERNARDINO 

McNeil's Grocery 

Golden Rule 

Bates Grocery 

ARCADIA 

Shular Bros. 



MONTROSE 
Hoffman- Fowler 

MONROVIA 
Kellar Grocery Co. 

SIERRA MADRE 
T. Salury 



ALTADENA 
Altadena Grocery Store 

TORRENCE 
Paige's 

WATTS 
G. J. Burger 



MONETA 

R. W. Ahlberg 

GLENDALE 

All Grocery Stores 

COLTON 

Magills 

Burton-Powell Co. 



Page 30 



The CLUBWOMAN 



May. One of the most outstanding civic betterments 
was the completion of the children's playground pro- 
gram, which has brought joy to the hearts of in- 
numerable youngsters since the installation of the 
equipment sometime ago. 

The three day and night bazaar held just before 
Christmas proved a great success financially as well 
as socially. The closing night of which was one of 
fun and frolic in the "rube" ball and carnival as the 
finish. 

Other activities consisted in part of banquets fur- 
nished the Chamber of Commerce of Balboa, dinner 
dance, card parties and many other lesser programs. 

The lecture given by Miss Ruth Antoinette Sabel, 
chairman of industrial music of Los Angeles, on 
industrial music at the schoolhouse, was very in- 
structive and inspirational. 

Space forbids the enumeration of many other ac- 
tivities due to this small though enthusiastic body 
of women, who, while enjoying a short vacation 
from club work, have nevertheless been planning 
for a yet more active year to come when Mrs. Lillian 
Richards will head the list of officers. 



THE ELYSIAN HEIGHTS 
CIVIC CLUB 

By Miss Mart/ia Ringstrom, Press Chairman 
Though no regular monthly meetings have been 
held during the summer months by the members of 
the Elysian Heights Civic Club of Los Angeles, the 
summer work of the club has progressed more en- 
thusiastically than ever before, due to the untiring 
efforts of the club's president, Mrs. Asa Brockman, 
other officers, and committee chairmen, to arouse in 
the people of the community an interest and a desire 
to help, financially and otherwise, in the erection of a 
much needed community clubhouse and community 
center, upon the ground owned by the club. 

The kind offer of the Elysian Heights Improve- 
ment Association, made through its president, Mr. 



L R. Brown, to assist the Elysian Heights Civic Club 
in every way possible to raise funds with which to 
erect the proposed community clubhouse, has been 
accepted. By the united efforts of both organiza- 
tions, it is hoped that a sufficient amount of money 
will be raised so that an attractive building large 
enough to include an auditorium, dressing rooms, 
kitchen and dining room, and possibly a public cir- 
culating library, may be built within the next year. 
The work of neighborhood solicitation for funds is 
to begin shortly. 

The first regular monthly meeting of the new year 
of the club was held on the island at Echo Park 
Friday, September 4. This meeting was very, well 
attended by the clubwomen members and their 
friends. Many topics of importance were discussed 
and many resolutions were adopted, among which 
was one which pertained to the reforestation of our 
mountains and waste lands. Another concerned prop- 
er chaperonage of the young children who attend 
the children's moving picture matinees in the vari- 
ous theaters in the city. 

It has been revealed, time and time again, that 
men of a degenerate type of mind enter a theater 
during children's matinees for the distinct purpose 
of revealing to innocent children their true nature 
by making suggestive movements and remarks to 
them. The writer, who has on various occasions 
assisted as a chaperone at a local theater, has ob- 
served closely the actions of suspicious-looking men, 
and in nearly every instance has discovered that 
they were making themselves obnoxious to those 
around them, to little boys as well as to little girls. 
In every case the men were requested to leave, which 
they did with alacrity. Annoyers of women and little 
children should be punished if we hope to place a 
check on this type of .man. You would most assured- 
ly not care to have your own child, nor that of your 
neighbor, come in contact with a person of that type 
if you could prevent it. You may say, "Well, what 
you say may be true. But what can be done about 




'T'HE highest award of the 
'■ American Association of 
Medical Milk Commissions 
went for the second time to 
iDOHl CERTIFIED-GUERNSEY MILK 
at Atlantic City in May. 



Its winning score of 99.5% in 
this annual National contest was 
on samples from the regular daily 
run. Adohr's record of continuous 
high scores has never been equalled. 




OCTOBER, 1925 



Page 31 



it? Won't the police do soraetliing about it or the 
theater managers?" They are doing what they can 
to remedy it, but they really need the assistance of 
women in detecting the presence and actual work of 
these depraved men. Much can be done about it if 
the clubwomen of the entire city will but co-operate 
by stationing one or more of their members in their 
local theatre every child's matinee, week in and week 
out. The majority of theater managers are willing 
to co-operate with the women in this idea of child- 
protection, for it is bound to increase their matinee 
business. 

Other topics were discussed, but for lack of space 
these will be omitted in this article. The meeting 
of the Elysian Heights Civic Club closed with a pic- 
nic supper which was spread under the beautiful 
trees on the picnic tables. This supper was shared 
by the husbands, brothers, sons and daughters of 
the members who came to the island after the busi- 
ness meeting. All voted it to be a most successful 
affair. 



POMONA WOMAN'S CLUB 

By Mrs. Mary Oat/wut, Press Chairman 

The Pomona Woman's Club, now thirty years old, 
or more, is in fine trim for the work which the 
splendid executive committee has mapped out for 
1925-26. Several of our younger members are heart- 
ily co-operating to make this the best year yet. 

A variety of subjects will be studied, among which 
are: geography, politics, economics, civics, art, music, 
social conditions, current events, newer education, etc. 

Our club is the oldest woman's club in Pomona, 
and was the first to join the Federation. Our mem- 
bership stands at thirty-five, in number, so that we 
can meet in our homes, thus becoming more inti- 
mately acquainted than a large number. 

Dr. Phoebe Spalding of Pomona College, an hon- 
orary member, gives us one of her charming and 
instructive programs toward the close of the year, 
to which we all look forward with keen expectancy. 
It is then we have "guest day," and a most enjoy- 
able time. 




CALIFORNIA HISTORY AND 
LANDMARKS CLUB 

By Mrs. E. M. Timer hojf. Press Chairman 
With the state and district chairmen of History and 
Landmarks, Miss Grace Stoermer and Mrs. A. S. C. 
Forbes, as honor guests of the day, the opening of 
the History and Landmarks club, on October 15, in 
the department room of the Ebell Club, will be of 
marked interest. 

The president, Mrs. Florence Dodson Schoneman, 
will preside over a program of variety which in- 
cludes the presentation of a group of three songs by 
Grace Coe Gouther, music curator for the club ; a 
report of summer activities and plans for the winter 
by the president; roll call of membership in relation 
to the Redwood fund by the chairman, Mrs. E. M. 
Tiraerhoff; report of the delegate, Mrs. F. A. Bran- 
nen, on the State Convention ; history of the club 
from its beginning up to the present, by Mrs. Ella 
Ludwig, and introduction of the guests of honor by 
the president. 

Mrs. Schoneman and her mother, Mrs. Rudecinda 
de Dodson, were centers of interest during the Dia- 
mond Jubilee at San Francisco, Mrs. de Dodson being 
a Grand Dame of the occasion, and were special 
guests of honor at the reception and dinner tendered 
Dr. Mariana Bertola as a fitting finale. Dr. Bertola, 
now president of the C. F. W. C, is also past presi- 
dent of the Native Daughters. Miss Grace Stoermer 
was toastmistress and hostess at the Admission Day 
luncheon held at the Biltmore on September 8, at 



Be 

fall 



soap 



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considerate of your 
woolen s — sweaters, 

scarves, knotted caps and 

coats. 

They can be washed safely and easily 
with White King Washing Machine 
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other sensitive, delicate fabrics. 

They will keep their fresh, new 
appearance, even after countless wash- 
ings, if you use this pure vegetable-oil 
soap. 

Sold only in the package. 

Los Angeles Soap Co. 



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I FOR EVERY HOUSEHOtD U&fc 

I NVITH OP- vs/lTMOUTA \A<A^HITj^&^_!;2^_C-_mN_^ 

'- 



r 



Tage 32 



The CLUBWOMAN 



which Mrs. A. S. C. Forbes gave a toast "The Poppy 
and Its Legend." This was attended by prominent 
members of the City Club, Rotary, Kiwanis and other 
leading organizations. 



THE WOMAN'S CLUB OF 
CLAREMONT 

By Mrs. A. L. Thompson 

The Woman's Club of Claremont has made great 
strides during the past year, mounting from sixty- 
five members to over two hundred in that period. 
The beautiful new club-house is nearing completion 
and will be a credit to the women who had vision 
enough to conceive and carry through the project as 
well as to the town of Claremont. Mr. Jonathan 
Ring of Los Angeles is the architect; he has evolved 
a charming building out of the old bare hall which 
the ladies had purchased. 

Mrs. H. C. Gower is the capable president, and 
Mrs. E. H. Sanford the efficient secretary. Mrs. O. 
H. Duvall has charge of the program for the coming 
year, consequently every one is looking forward to 
a splendid season among the club women of the city. 
Already plans are forming for a music course, the 
proceeds of which will go towards financing the fine 
Steinway grand piano recently purchased by the club 
committee appointed for this purpose, which is headed 
by Mrs. A. S. Thompson. Mrs. Fred Hill has worked 
long and faithfully as the head of the building com- 
mittee; the fruit of their labors will make every one 
proud to be a member of a body that owns so beau- 
tiful and commodious a home. The furnishing com- 
mittee is headed by Mrs. Paul Jordan Smith, which 
assures a most artistically equipped and charming 
exterior. 

This thoroughly modern and well arranged club 
house will fill a long-felt want in this little city by 
providing a place where the women of the town can 
entertain in an up-to-date manner, as the clubhouse 
has a wonderful dining-room and kitchen, beside the 
auditorium and gallery. In addition there are cloak- 
rooms and dressing-rooms all beautifully arranged. 



SAN JACINTO WOMAN'S CLUB 

By Harriet M. Hill, Corresponding Secretary 
The San Jacinto Woman's Club was organized 
April 1918, started on its successful career by Mrs. C. 
McEwen and Mrs. C. D. Pool. 

Four years ago we purchased our present Club 
House. It was remodeled, painted ,and decorated, 
grounds were re-arranged and improved with flow- 
ers, etc. Starting with a heavy incumbrance on the 
property, we are proud to say we now have it free 
and clear. This was accomplished only by hard work 
(community dinners, sales and various entertain- 
ments). 

Our program each year has been enjoyable and in- 
structive. The subjects were Child Welfare, Gov- 
ernment, Federal and State, Travel, Music, Home 
Life, etc. At present our membership is small, but 
prospects are good for a decided increase. The open- 
ing meeting this season was September 29. We meet 
the second and fourth Monday each month. 



THE IVY CLUB 

By Mrs. Joe C. Corioin, Press Chairman 
We are frequently asked the question. What be- 
comes of the funds collected by the Ivy Club? 

The Ivy Club is a benefit club, and all moneys 
received by it through its various activities are used 
to help "nice" people, "even as you and I," who 



have been unfortunate and are temporarily embar- 
rassed and are not objects of charity. 

The officers and members give of their time and 
money that the expenses be kept at the minimum 
and the balance used to the best advantage. 

During the summer months the activities have tak- 
en the form of a dance each month at The Rendez- 
vous, Ocean Park, and the proceeds from the last 
dance are to be contributed to the Santa Barbara 
Relief Fund. 

A most successful picnic for members and their 
families was held in Sycamore Grove, recently. 

Mrs. Lillian Hatter Dodge, who is serving as 
president for the second year entertained her officers 
and chairmen of committees at her home, when plans 
were formulated for the ensuing year. 

The first card party of the season will be held 
in the Clark Hotel Parlors, Tuesday, October 6, play- 
ing to commence promptly at 1:30 . m., at which 
time we hope to welcome all our old friends and 
many new ones. 



THE WOMAN'S CLUB OF 
HERMOSA BEACH 

By Mrs. James MacMillan, Press Chairman 
In compliment to the members of The Woman's 
Club of Hermosa Beach and in order to stimulate a 
greater interest in music, the newly elected Presi- 
dent, Mrs. Henry G. Grimwood, entertained the 
members and their guests at a Musical in the spa- 
cious sun-room of the Surf and Sand Club, in full 
view of the ocean and beach, from 3 to 5 o'clock on 
the afternoon of July 18. Miss Ruth May Shaffner, 
dramatic soprano, who has sung with the San Fran- 
cisco and Los Angeles Opera Companies and as a 
soloist with the Philharmonic Orchestra and who is 
leaving for a season in New York, sang the follow- 
ing numbers: 

On Wings of Song Mendelssohn 

L'Heure Exquise Poldowski 

Song of the Open La Forge 

Thy Beaming Eyes MacDowell 

Song of Meditation Parka 

The Answer Terry 

Miss Grace Eaton Dow accompanied Miss Shaff- 
ner and also played several piano solos. Mrs. Lau- 
rie Gregory Nicholson played a number of her own 
compositions which were sung by Ada Potter Wise- 
man, soprano. Mrs. Dow also accompanied Eleanor 
Georgia Hunter, contralto and Ralph Reilly, concert 
tenor, both of KFI fame. Mrs. Howard Towle ac- 
companied Mrs. Louis M. Brown, contralto, as well 
as Mrs. Glenn Bannister. 

The club owns its own clubhouse, equipment and 
piano and its members are looking forward to a 
very successful year both intellectually and finan- 
cially. 



NEW STUDIO OPENS 

Grace Adele Freebey, the well known Los Angeles 
pianist and composer, has opened her new studio in 
the Friday Morning Clubhouse. Miss Freebey is not 
only one of our leading pianists and composers but 
her work as a teacher stood out prominently during 
the last Eisteddfod contest in Los Angeles when one 
of her advanced pupils won the gold medal. Miss 
Freebey is also an accompanist and coach of recog- 
nized ability. Many singers and instrumentalists on 
the concert platform coach with her when in Los 
Angeles. 

Miss Freebey is in her charming new studio on 
Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday. 



OCTOBER. 1925 



Page 33 



HUNTINGTON PARK EBELL 
CLUB 

By Margery U. Ford, Press Chairman 
The club opened with a business and social meet- 
ing, September 1, Mrs. Ellen Webster, retiring presi- 
dent, in the chair. There was a short general busi- 
ness session, report of board meetings and reading 
of the president's letter. Mrs. Webster gave a brief 
resume of the work of the past year, and thanked 
her officers and members for their loyal help. She 
asked that her successor receive the same, and that 
the club try even to do better. New officers were in- 
troduced and installed, Mrs. Josephine Burdge taking 
the chair. She gave a short address, thanking the 
club, and asking co-operation for the coming year. 
She gave a brief outline of the year's work, an- 
nounced that instructors for the English, Drama and 
Music departments had been secured, classes to begin 
October 6. Mrs. F. O. Crossley, on behalf of the 
club presented Mrs. Wbester with a beautiful lamp 
and oriental vase, a gift of appreciation of her loyal 
service to the Club. 



SANTA BARBARA WOMAN'S 
CLUB 

By Mrs. Michel A. Levy, President 
The Santa Barbara Woman's Club has had an 
active summer as all of its efforts have been spent 
in assisting in relief work. Two weeks ofter the 
earthquake of June 29 a mass meeting for women 
was held in Alameda Plaza where the women, after 
listening to stirring speeches on raising of the relief 
fund, assisting in maintaining the public morale, and 
helping in the reconstruction of a city beautiful along 
the lines of Spanish architecture, pledged their sup- 
port and co-operation. 



Have You an Arden Certified 

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Boy 

at 

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raised upon this highest 
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nineteen years. 

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Orange Counties. 



Following this meeting, a Woman's Gift Com- 
mittee was formed which, by means of small gifts, 
card parties and entertainments, has raised about 
$5,000 toward the relief work. 

The Public Affairs Committee sent out over 600 
letters to the Federated Clubs of the State asking for 
assistance and have received whole-hearted response. 
Led by the Friday Morning Club of Los Angeles, 
some of the clubs are furnishing clothes for the 
needy children of Santa Barbara and the woman's 
club is acting as distributing agent. We have also 
entertained the foreign women with a party at the 
club house and are sponsoring a club for colored 
women which has just been formed. 

Our club season opens October 7 and we are plan- 
ning a most interesting season of programs, and for 
the first time are inaugurating department study, hav- 
ing formed sections on Books and Literature, Better 
Homes, Music, and Public Affairs. 

We hope to be a means of stimulation and relaxa- 
tion during the trying days of reconstruction work. 

L. U. B. A. CLUB OF 
LONG BEACH 

By Miss Blanche I. Smith, Press Chairman 
The L. U. B. A. Club, "Let Us Become Acquainted," 
of twenty-two members, is looking forward to a 
very profitable and enjoyable year of study. Last 
year we studied "California, Its Geography, History, 
Land-marks, Artists and Poets." This year our pro- 
gram committee has arranged a miscellaneous pro- 
gram of Travelogue, Science, Literature and Drama. 
We were very happy to have our District presi- 
dent, Mrs. James B. Lorbeer, as our guest at our 
first meeting, September 11, at the home of Mrs. 
R. L. Buffum. Her address was most helpful and 
inspiring, giving us a splendid forward look for our 
year's work. 




For 
Every Baking 
Purpose 




fg Flour 



Your Grocer Has It 



Page 34 



The CLUBWOMAN 



FRIDAY MORNING CLUB 



(Continued from Page 9) 
Luncheon, given on September 25th, and the guests 
were, the local newspaper women, those who were 
engaged in press work when Mrs. Clark was Presi- 
dent of the club in 1909-1911, and the Board of Di- 
rectors and the Chairmen of the committees for the 
coming club year, which are as follows: 

Program Committee: Mrs. Oliver P. Clark, Chair- 
man; Mrs. Richard C. Farrell, Art; Mrs. W. F. 
Thurston, Drama; Dr. Dorothea Moore, Literature; 
Mrs. Charles G. Stivers, Music; Mrs. John J. Abram- 
son. Public Affairs. 

Standing Committees: Mrs. W. A. Paxton, Cour- 
tesy; Mrs. G. L. Huyett, Decoration; Mrs. Ernest 
Fairman Bent, Door; Mrs. Charles F. Turner, Fi- 
nance; Mrs. William A. E. Noble, Hospitality; Mrs. 
Elmer Random Misemer, House; Mrs. Leslie E. 
Bliss, Librarian; Mrs. Fannie G. Woodside, Lunch- 
eons; Mrs. W. A. Bonynge, Luncheon Speakers; Mrs. 
William Kirtley Chambers, Membership; Mrs. O. C. 
Welbourn, Page; Mrs. J. A. Osgood, Parliamentar- 
ian; Mrs. Frederick Hickok, Press; Mrs. Charles 
Lincoln Benham, Printing; Mrs. Leo J. S. Smith, 
Psychology; Mrs. Everett B. Latham, Reciprocal Re- 
lations; Mrs. Charles S. Burnell, Rental; Mrs. Max 
Roth, Ticket; Mrs. J. S. Killian, Ushers; Mrs. 
Charles F. Towne, Club Visitor; Mrs. Edmond M. 
Lazard, Federation Secretary; Mrs. Charles Lincoln 
Benham, Editor Bulletin. 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS COMMITTEE 

By Josephine Hitty Abramson, Chairman 

What next, we asked, after many years of the 
very best in Public Affairs in the Friday Morning 
Club? It almost seemed necessary to find a new in- 
terest. On July 1 George E. Cryer, Mayor of Los 
Angeles, had the power to appoint almost one hun- 
dred commissioners as aides to the city government. 
These he presented to the City Council and we un- 
derstand not one appointment was rejected. Among 
the appointments were twenty women, eight of whom 
proved to b'e Friday Morning Club members who 
have given their energy and time to both club and 
city for a number of years. 

Each City Corrmiission has a corresponding Com- 
mittee of the City Council which gives a means for 
excellent co-operation. Our members of the Com- 
missions are: Mrs. Russell J. Waters and Mrs. J. 
F. Sartori, Housing; Mrs. Arthur C. Weir, Play 
Grounds; Mrs. John J. Abramson, City Planning; 
Mrs. Francis Harmon Zahn and Mrs. J. Wells Smith, 
Library; Mrs. Anne George de Mille, Municipal 
Art, and Miss Mary Workman, Civil Service. (There 
are also a number of our members on County and 
State Boards and Commissions). 

We might feel limited in our endeavors were it 
not for the fact that some tremendously vital mat- 
ters will come before our Commissions this year and 
we hope to follow them closely. 

Political behavior is going to be studied in many 
universities this year and we hope to be able to 
touch upon this subject. Think of it! Some of us 
may live long enough to see a development of a 
scientific knowledge of politics. Mrs. Arthur Wier 
was the first to give this club an opportunity towards 
this subject and we wish we might use her method, 
but, hope to have some good results which will take 
us a step forward and help us to such knowledge as 
we believe will create a fuller interest in Public 
Affairs and that we will realize that a careless vote 
is worse than none. It is now five years since the 
United States women have had their franchise. It 



is embarrassing to look back upon our classification. 
May we hope there is no embarrassment when we 
look back upon the use we have made of the ballot, 
Mrs. Seward Simons, internationally known, will be 
our Chairmen of International Relations and we 
know she will be a source of much knowledge on this 
subject. Through another we hope to touch upon 
the subject of Pacific Relations and Race Dignity. 

Mrs. George Herbert Clark as Chairman of Edu- 
cation must certainly bring us something that will 
be-speak advancement. California will not stand still 
in educational matters. We hope to have two speak- 
ers each first Tuesday of the month; one to cover 
the Commission subject and another as after lunch- 
eon speaker on some timely subject. Discussion and 
suggestions from the floor will be invited. Our com- 
mittee members are: 

Building and Safety, Mrs. Joe Crail and Mrs. Ed- 
ward A. Dickson; Board of Public Works, Mrs. 
Johann G. Schutte; City Planning, Mrs. May H. Rob- 
erts and Mrs. E. F. Allen; Police and Fire, Mrs. M. 
H. Pehr and Miss lanthe Densmore; Harbour, Mrs. 
Frank E. Trask and Mrs. Carl A. Bundy; Housing, 
Mrs. E. K. Foster and Mrs. E. N. Ettelson; Library 
and Municipal Art, Mrs. Frances Harmon Zahn; 
Parks and Playgrounds, Mrs. Arthur Wier and Mrs. 
.Leo M. Simmons; Social Service, Mrs. Josephine L. 
Baker and Mrs. George L. Richards; Water and 
Power, a special corrunittee. 

Our President, Mrs. Oliver P. Clark, has appointed 
a number of our members to meet with District work- 
ers and we hope this Co-operation will bring most 
excellent reports to our club. 

Since this is Californias' Diamond Jubilee, our 
first Friday Morning platform speaker will be Roland 
A. Vandergrift, on the "Plays of California." 



CUCAMONGA WOMAN'S CLUB 

By Lyllian G. Bishop, Press Chairman 

Reviewing our Country's history in a series of en- 
tertaining programs was a feature of the past sea- 
son's work in the Cucamonga Woman's Club, with a 
membership of forty-eight, meeting bi-monthly at the 
homes of members. Other meetings included inter- 
esting and constructive programs on literature, art. 
music, astronomj', a patriotic program on Lincoln's 
Birthday, a program appropriate to "Better Speech 
Week," and many others. 

Outstanding among the past season's achievements, 
aside from our annual welfare and benevolences, was 
the formation of a Study Section for the study of 
the Bible, meeting monthly in the Cucamonga M. E. 
Church, which meetings proving of such benefit and 
interest were continued throughout the summei 
months. 

The entertainment committee is now busily pre- 
paring for our opening fall reception and musicale, 
to be held October 8th at the Red Hill Country 
Clubhouse. 

The first board meeting under the new president 
was held at her home recently, to outline a series of 
snappy and constructive programs for the ensuing 
year. 

Officers for the season 1925-26 elected at the last 
meeting in May, are: president, Mrs. E. S. Bishop; 
vice-president, Mrs. Chas. Beckley; recording secre- 
tary, Mrs. C. J. Wheeler; corresponding secretary, 
Mrs. A. C. Smithburn; treasurer, Mrs. J. H. Will- 
iams; auditor. Miss Gertrude Reid. 




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The Broadway — Third Floor 







1^— a— ■^■^■^ yo 



m 





Vol. XVI 



.'C 



NOVEMBER, ig25 



No. 2 



about 

His 

Clothes 




He may be your husband, your son, or a brother, and 
you esteem him for himself, but you do wish he had a 
bit better luck with his clothes. 

May we suggest, that with that diplomacy which every 
woman must master in dealing with the secondary sex, 
you kindly lead him into a department where the se- 
lection of the right clothes, at the right price, is not a 
matter of chance, but a quite secure certainty? 

You may depend upon our complete, and grateful, co- 
operation. 



(^ 



MULLEN & BLUETT 



CLOTHIERS 



Broadway at Sixth Hollywood Blvd. at Vms 

Pasadena in November 




oAsk Your 'Dealer 

Kling Manufacturing Co., Los Angeles 



Vol. XVI NOVEMBER, 1925 No. 2 

Published Monthly Office Mission St. and. Mound Ave., South Pasadena, Calif. 

Telephone VAndike 0111 

Subscription Price 50 Cents Per Year, Ten Cents the Copy Send subscriptions to Mrs. Bert Clifford, Box 26, 

South Pasadena, Cal. 

Edited by the Press Chairmen of the Clubs Represented 
Entered at the South Pasadena PostofEce as second-class matter. 



J. C. EDWARDS 

Pet Stock 

of All Kinds and 

Everything for 

Them 

Fancy Canaries, Talking 
Parrots, Aviary Birds, 
Goldfish, Puppies, Kit- 
tens, Cages, Remedies, 
Seeds and Foods. 

We advise free and freely. ^. 

613 S. Grand Ave. 

Tel. VAndike 93 I 7 Los Angeles, Cal. 





Christmas Gifts 
From the Orient 

Tai Chan Co. 

Cloissone, Brass, Lac- 
quer, Porcelain, Kimo- 
nos, Haori and Man- 
darin Coats, Oriental 
Jewelry, Novelties. 

62 1 So. Flowrer St., L. A. 
(3 Doors No. of The Elite) 



A Favorite Investment 

Southern California Edison securities are recommended for 
women investors because they are safe 

Of the 80,000 Edison Partners, 32,848 are women 
Write for Particulars 

Southern California Edison Company 

Edison Building, 306 West Third Street, Los Angeles 
Phone MAin 7120 



Page 4 



The CLUBWOMAN 



A. T. BAKER & CO., Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

VELOURS 



anc 



CUT VELVETS 

for UPHOLSTERY PURPOSES 



NEW YORK 
41 UNION SQUARE 



LOS ANGELES 
SIXTH AND MAIN STS. 

CENTRAL BLDG. CHICAGO 

Mills: 28 E. JACKSON BLVD. 

Manayunk, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Roxboro, North Carolina 



With 3C 

You can Overcome The 

Handicaps To Skin and Hair 

of the Hard Alkali Water in 

This Country. 

3C is the Modern, Conven- 
ient City Equivalent To 
Putting Out a Wash Tub To 
Catch Rain Water For a 
Shampoo. 



COMFORT 







Also Means 

CLEANLINESS 



You Can Buy 3C At These 

Places— 

LOS ANGELES 

A. & O. 

Broadway Department Store 

The May Co. 

HOLLYWOOD 

Carty Bros. 

FLINTRIDGE 

Flintridge Grocery Co. 

BEVERLY HILLS 

R. P. O'Connor 

PASADENA 

F. C. Nash Co. 

The Model Grocery 

LONG BEACH 

The Wall Co. 

RIVERSIDE 

C. F. Elder 

Alfred M. Lewis 

Sweet Grocery Co. 



CHARM 



If you will use 3C in the water whenever you wash, your friends from the East can no longer 
This water is dreadfully hard on your skin, isn't it, my dear?" 
It is a perfect water softener and can be used with your favorite soap for bath or shampoo. 
A little in a glass of water absolutely cleans your rings. 

You Can Buy 3C At These Places 



SAN BERNARDINO 

McNeil's Grocery 

Golden Rule 

Bates Grocery 

ARCADIA 

Shular Bros. 



MONTROSE 
Hoffman- Fowler 

MONROVIA 
Kellar Grocery Co. 

SIERRA MADRE 

T. Salary 



ALTADENA 
Altadena Grocery Store 

TORRENCE 
Paige's 

WATTS 
G. J. Burger 



MONETA 

R. W. Ahlberg 

GLENDALE 

All Grocery Stores 

COLTON 

Magills 

Burton-Powell Co. 



NOFEMBER, 1925 



Page 5 



i3u 



«_>^-~> 



Contents 



r-«^_j 



Friday Morning Club 6 

A Los Angeles Exposition in Miniature 8 

Woman's Club of Hollywood. _ 9 

Los Angeles Ebell 10 

Santa Monica Bay Woman's Club 12 

Los Angeles City Teacher's Club 12 

University Book Club 13 

Soroptimist Club 13 

South Side Ebell ^ 14 

Woman's University Club _ 15 

Woman's Twentieth Century Club 16 

Shakespearre Club of Pasadena 16 

Elsinore Woman's Club 18 

Friday Afternoon Club of Ontario 18 

American University Study Club 18 

Highland Park Ebell _ 19 

Tuesday Afternoon Club of Glendale 20 

Woman's Club of Lancaster 20 

Ramona Woman's Club of Monterey Park 21 

Neptunian Club 21 

The Ivy Club 21 

Palmdale Woman's Club 23 

Woman's Club of Big Bear Lake 23 

E. O. Club of Ventura 23 

San Fernando Ebell Club- ,..- 23 

Pomona Ebell Club 24 

Professional Woman's Club 24 

Long Beach Ebell 25 

Goleta -Woman's Club 25 

Burbank Woman's Club '. 25 

Golden State Division 28 

Gardena Wednesday Progressive Club 28 

Woman's Civic League of Newport Beach 28 

The Reciprocity Club ~ 28 

Saugus Community Club 29 

Woman's Club of Claremont 29 

Tujunga Woman's Club _ 30 

Mission Acres Club 30 

San Jacinto Woman's Club 30 

The Community Club, Santa Maria _ 30 

The Guadalupe Welfare Club 31 

Owensmouth Woman's Club 31 

The Parliamentary Law Club of Glendale 31 

Woman's Auxiliary of the R. M. A 32 

College Woman's Club of Long Beach 32 

La Canada Thursday Club 32 

Echo Park Mother's Club 32 

Los Angeles Tuesday Afternoon Club 34 

■Big Pine Friday Afternoon Study Club- 34 

Woman's Improvement Club of Blythe - 34 

Kate Tupper Galpin Shakespeare Club 34 



The Ville de Paris 
features 

''Ivy' Corsets 

IN iMODELS FOR 
EVERY NEED! 



W omen of every 
corseting need find 
satisfaction in these 
famous foundatioa 
garments .... 
because of their 
perfect, clinging fit! 

Available in JVrap- 
arounds, Corsettes, 
Girdles, and a splen- 
did line of Bras- 
sieres/ 

AT THE riLLE 



FOURTH FLOOR 




4^1''^^ 



SEVENTH "»*^Ar01,IVt 

B.H.DYASCO. 



Children's Book 
Week 

November 9th to 15th 

Exhibits of Children's Books 
loaned for Club Programs. 

New Catalogue of Children's 
Books mailed upon request. 

See display of Books suitable for 
Home Libraries. 



Opposite lheJ0rNIl.O 426-428 

Square BOOK StOrC Sixth 

Los Angeles, California 

TRinity 431 1 



Page 6 



The CLUBfFOMAN 



iilllill 



llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllillllllll 



FRIDAY -MORNING CWB 



Mrs. Frederick Hickokj Press Chairman 



The five Fridays in October have all been marked 
by programs of distinction in the Friday Morning 
Club. On October 2, the opening day of the club 
year was the President's Address, by Mrs. O. P. 
Clark; Auditor's report, by Mrs. Carrie S. Greene 
and "What Friday Morning Clubwomen Have Ac- 
complished in the Past Fifteen Years," by Katherine 
Philips Edson. Luncheon guests were Mrs. Willough- 
by Rodman, and members of the board of directors 
of the club fifteen years ago. 

On October 9, Mr. Axel Simonsen, violoncellist, and 
founder of the Brahms Quintette, assisted by Homer 
Grunn, pianist, gave the program. 

Sir John Adams, who has recently been knighted by 
the King of England for his eminence in the cause of 
education, was the speaker on October 16 and his sub- 
ject was "Odyssey of an Emeritus." 

Luncheon speakers were Dr. Jennie C. Spencer on 
"The Woman's Clinic," and Dr. Evangeline Jordon on 
"How to Add Ten Years to Life." 

"Creative Women from Sappho to de Stael," a cos- 
tume lecture-recital of original plays, was given by 
Gretchen Hensel Copper and Eola Hopkins on Octo- 
ber 23. 

Rolland A. Vandergrift, Professor of History in the 
University of Southern California, will lecture on Oc- 
tober 30 on "California Under Seven Flags." 

The Drama, Public Affairs, Literature and Art 
Committees meetings have been changed to luncheon 
programs again and each Thursday interesting people 
are scheduled to appear on the various programs. 

The Studio Tours, which were instituted by Mrs. 
Gustav Biorkman last year, are to be continued under 
the direction of Mrs. Richard Farrell, art chairman 
On October 15 the first tour was to the studios of 
Orrin White and the Wachtels — in Pasadena. 

The Psychology Committee, under the direction of 
Mrs. Leo J. S. Smith, enjoyed Dr. Harold Will- 
iams as speaker on October 27. His subject was 
"HoW| Mental Capacity Develops." Non-members 
may attend these lectures on the payment of a small 
fee. 

The Auditors report shows the club to be in excel- 
lent financial condition, with total assets $784,316, a 
debt of less than $400,000, a surplus of $431,166.38, 
an income of $100,288.71 for the year, and expendi- 
tures of $78,779.87. 

The Friday Morning Club has joined the Woman's 
Club of Paris and on presentation of a membership 
card there with the fee of $1.00, any member might 
enjoy the privileges of that club with hotel accom- 
modations for two weeks. 

Mrs. J. Pirnle Davidson has been appointed assist- 
ant press chairman of the club. 

Mrs. William A. E. Noble, hospitality chairman, 
is planning to have one distinctive social function each 
month during the club year, and for the month of 
November it will be a bridge luncheon, on Novem- 
ber 19. Mrs. William Kirtley Chambers has been 
appointed chairman and is, with her committee, plan- 
ning something different from the usual affaif. 



REVIEW OF MUSICAL PROGRAMS PRESENTED 
BY THE FRIDAY MORNING CLUB DUR- 
ING THE PAST FOUR YEARS 
Mrs. Charles G. Stivers, Music Chairman 

"Music is to the mind what the plow is to the soil." — 
Arthur Brisbane. 

The Friday Morning Club, we feel, is aiding in no 
small measure the musical growth of Los Angeles. 
Keeping pace with its growth towards becoming one 
of the largest cities in the world, we as a Club are 
doing our share in raising the standard of musical 
programs, by presenting only the best of the many 
artists of merit, who are making this city their home. 

It is a source of deep regret that we cannot give 
a hearing to a greater number of those who deserve 
and are desirous of appearing before our Club; but 
with at most, only nine programs a year (sometimes 
only seven), you will readily see that it is impossible 
to present even a large per cent of those it would be 
a pleasure for us to hear. 

When Mrs. Lobingier, in June, 1921, asked me to 
be her Music Chairman for the coming year, I may 
as well admit that my heart throbbed with unusual 
vehemence, and my soul was filled with a great joy. 

To be able to serve the Friday Morning Club, as 
chairman of music, for a year, to really be a music 
program builder, was, to me, a great adventure and 
a position more to be desired than any other in the 
Club. 

Now, beginning my fifth consecutive year of occupy- 
ing the same position, I am filled with as much enthu- 
siasm and joy in the work, as that with which I antici- 
pated it four years ago. There are several reasons 
for this. 

1. Always the Board of Directors has been behind 
me in presenting only the best — even if the cost was 
great. 

2. The Club members have at all times been most 
appreciative of my efforts and by their cordiality 
and friendliness have endeared themselves to all of 
the artists appearing before them. 

3. The number of splendid men and women musi- 
cians who have sought me out because I was music 
chairman of a great women's club and might be of 
service to them, has broadened my acquaintanceship 
among the newer members of the music colony and 
brought many delightful friendships to me. 

Before I begin to review programs, I may as well 
admit that this article is altogether too personal for 
The Clubwoman, judged by magazine ethics, but 
Mrs. Hickok told me to write whatever I wished, and 
it has long been my desire to express more publicly my 
happiness in this work, and I do hope that none read- 
ing this will object too seriously, nor consider the 
article too unethical. 

I find that during the year '21-22 we had the 
Zoellner String Quartette — Mr. Ferir, violinist; Mr. 
DeBusscher, oboeist, and Axel Simonsen, 'cellist, the 
last three from the Philharmonic Orchestra. Mme. 
Bem, a really great woman violinist; Kajetan Attl, 
harpist, and Harriet Bennett, soprano, who, by the 
way, is singing with great success in light opera in 
London, England. These artists came to us from our 
sister city, San Francisco. Then we had Eleanor 
Woodford, soprano ; Mrs. Robinson and Mrs. Lott, 



NOVEMBER, 1925 



Page 7 




Miss Edna Florella Montague, as she appeared in Costume at the recent "Fashion Show of Other Days," 

givenby the Friday Morning Club — Photo by Wtzel. 



accompanists, and one of the world's greatest woman 
pianists, Olga Steeb, who thrilled the audience in a 
manner rarely accomplished by any artist. These, 
with an Armenian soprano, Marie Bashian, who, in 
charming Armenian costumes, sang a varied pro- 
gram, completed the musical programs for the year. 

During '22-23 we again sent to San Francisco for 
two sterling artists, Lawrence Strauss, tenor, and 
Harriett Bennett, lovelier than ever, who gave her 
first California program for us, after a year of coach- 
ing in New York. Mrs. McDonald, Mrs. Selby, Mr. 
Harmon, tenor, and Mr. Williams, baritone, with 
Mrs. Robinson at the piano, presented, in costume, 
Liza Lehmann's "In a Persian Garden" most charm- 
ingly. 

Carl Gantvoort, baritone, and Jules Lepske, violin- 
ist, gave the opening program, Mr. Lepske appear- 
ing also on the last program, with Alice Forsyth 
Mosher, soprano; Homer Simmons, pianist (who 
came unheralded and almost unknown, making the 
big success of the morning), and our ever delightful 
Mrs. Robinson as accompanist. That morning we had 
Emil Oberhoffer, then conductor of the Minneapolis 
Symphony, as a most distinguished guest. 

It was a great triumph to present the Philharmonic 
String Quartette, composed of the first chairmen of 



the Symphony Orchestra, Noack, Svedrofsky, Bronson 
and Ferir, in April, and it seemed to us all that the 
crest had been reached, but — in February, 1924, the 
entire Philharmonic Orchestra, Walter Henry Roth- 
well, conductor, and Emile Ferir, soloist, gave a Fri- 
day Morning Club program. This is how it all came 
about. 

I had a vision one Saturday night, as I sat listen- 
ing to a Symphony concert of the Orchestra playing 
before the Friday Morning Club, and turning to my 
daughter, who was sitting beside me, told her of my 
thought. I hesitate to tell with what scorn she re- 
ceived "my vision," but she did say, "Mother, you 
are perfectly absurd; of course you cannot have such 
a program even for your beloved Friday Morning 
Club." I was properly put into another frame of 
mind, and yet (even though with a rapidly beating 
heart) I did go to the Board the following Wednesday 
and say "Please may I consult Mrs. Caroline Smith 
to see whether there is a possibility of our having 
the orchestra." I think the Board all felt sorry for 
me, but they did give me permission to talk to the 
orchestra manager, which in twenty minutes I was 
doing — result — co-operation between the Friday Morn- 
ing Club Board and the Orchestra manager, after 

(Continued on Page 33) 



SILENT SINGING 

Exercises by which great singers build and restore the 

voice. Equally _ valuable for the health and speaking 

voice of those who do not sing. 

Mme. Irwin Kellogg 

Friday Morning Club House, Mondays and Thursdays. 
Res. Phone WHitney 7793 TUcker 6288 



GRACE ADELE FREEBEY 

Pianist and Teacher of Piano 
Studio — Friday Morning Club House 

940 So. Figueroa Street 
Phone TUcker 6288 Residence Phone 52969 



Page 8 



The CLUBWOMAN 



A LOS ANGELES EXPOSITION IN MINIATURE 



B^ Mrs. Everett B. Latham 



Clubwomen who know their Federation history will 
be especially interested in a permanent exhibit of 
California manufactured products which is being in- 
stalled in the basement of the beautiful new Los 
Angeles Chamber of Commerce building. 

Women's interest in this exhibit should be stimu- 
lated by the importance which was attached to 
women's efforts in this direction three or four years 
ago, by such people as Mrs. William Fitzgerald, then 
President of the California Federation of Women's 
Clubs, Mayor Cryer of Los Angeles, Mayor Rolph 
of San Francisco, and other leading citizens. 

In the early part of 1922 there was in Los Angeles 
and in all California, a serious problem confronting 
the citizens of the State, in the question of the great 
amount of unemployment, and the clubwomen of that 
period made their contribution to the welfare of the 
commonwealth b}' instituting a campaign to further 
the buying of California products. 

A resolution passed by the Los Angeles District 
Convention at Santa Monica in March, 1922, says: 
"Whereas, the question of unemployment is a serious 
problem in our State, and whereas unemployment is 
a strong factor in the prevalence of unrest and crime, 
therefore be it resolved that the members of the Los 
Angeles District, California Federation of Women's 
Clubs, pledge themselves to use, whenever possible, 
products manufactured in California, and thereby 
limit unemployment- to that extent." 

Other Districts, as their conventions came on in 
that spring, passed similar resolutions; the "Club- 
woman" of March, 1922, has on its cover the follow- 
ing paragraph: 

"With the specific purpose of producing work for the 
unempIo\'ed of California and thereby diminishing 
crime in this state, the California Federation of 
Women's Clubs has undertaken a campaign to promote 
the use by all Californians of California product?, 
and to place behind the movement the entire buying 
power of its membership of fifty-five thousand women. 

To this campaign the support of California manu- 
facturers and distributors of California products is 
essential " . 

In the same number of the magazine Mrs. William 
Fitzgerald writes: "While every citizen of the State 
ought to be sufficiently interested to be a factor, the 
success of the undertaking must depend largely upon 
the co-operation of women, who are the purchasing 
agents of the family. Our participation in this cam- 
paign seems to me a splendid opportunity for further- 
ing our citizenship program — to help create jobs for 
every individual willing to work." 

Mayor Cryer wrote: "It was to be expected that 
the most practical and splendid idea for the relief of 
unemployment should have its origin in the brain of 
one of our California women. It follows as a matter 
of course, that the idea should be taken up, enlarged 
upon, and put into execution by the California Fed- 
eration of Women's Clubs. 

When I heard of the unique campaign launched 
bj' 55,000 most influential women of the State, I was 
glad, because I knew then that the problem of un- 
employment . . . was about to be solved." 

In the April number of the magazine Mayor Rolph 
of San Francisco writes of the plan, most heartily 
endorsing it, as does Champ Vance, Vice-President of 
the Los Angeles Gas and Electric Corporation. 



C.^RRY On 

"The Manufacturers' Exhibit," which is an en- 
deavor to carry on what the women of the Cali- 
fornia clubs started four years ago, is a permanent 
exhibit, which will in the course of a short time be 
composed entirely of California products. 

It is located in the basement of the Chamber of 
Commerce Building, visited daily not only by thou- 
sands of Californians but by tourists from all over the 
country, and it should be interesting to all women, 
not only as citizens but as housewives, for the exhibit 
includes household and food manufactures as well 
as features of more direct interest to men. 

There will eventually be a model kitchen, furnished 
throughout with California-made utensils, and dem- 
onstrating cooking with only California-made ma- 
terials. 

There are building exhibits of the most intense in- 
terest to the woman who owns a lot and is expecting 
to carry out all her own ideas in the home that is 
to be built there. 

The exhibits of the interior decorators will interest 
the same woman, and the woman who lives on a 
ranch or has a garden, will be interested in the vari- 
ous agricultural devices and in the seed exhibits. 

There is to be a Community Chest displav and a 
little later a Boy Scout display: all the interests of 
life — home, business, philanthropical and educational, 
have their part in this gathering together of the 
things that go to make up our California life. 

One of the diplays which will be most interesting 
to clubwomen, is that of the California Hut — the 
work of disabled veterans of the World War. This 
organization, not a charity, but a means of helping 
these men to help themselves, is one which has been 
endorsed by the District, State and General Federa- 
tions, and the managers of the Manufacturers' exhibit 
have shown sympathy and co-operation in a very 
substantial way — by giving space in the exhibit hall 
to the Hut as a Los Angeles manufacturing concern. 
The wonderful wax dolls, some of them positively 
startling likenesses of famous film stars, the artistic 
favors, the leather work, the unique Christmas toys, 
make this exhibit one for women to linger over at 
this holiday season. 

Be.'^rinc Fruit 

There is, in addition to the exhibits, an auditorium 
seating several hundred persons, which is at the serv- 
ice, free of charge, of any responsible body applying 
for its use: there are moving pictures showing vari- 
ous of the manufactures, and there are weekly trips to 
manufacturing plants. 

Once a month there is a "sales luncheon" on the 
ninth floor of the Chamber of Commerce Building, to 
which the public is invited. 

The idea started by clubwomen so long ago is in- 
deed bearing fruit. To see to it that California manu- 
facturers and exhibitors are patronized is a good 
citizenship measure, just as fully now as irv 1922. 

The welfare of the State and the prosperity of its 
people depend to a large extent upon the develop- 
ment of its resources and manufacturing enterprises, 
and here is a most practical way in which seventy- 
five thousand women may help. 



NOFEMBER, 1925 



Page 9 



llllllllllUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIinillllllllllll!llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll»llllllllllllllllllll^ 

WOMAN^ dWB OFfiOIiL^WOOD 



By Julia Stalil, Press Cliairman 



The Woman's Club of Hollywood held their open- 
ing meeting of the club year on Wednesday, October 
7, at 2:30 o'clock, with Mrs. Charles Richmond pre- 
siding for the second year as president. 

Dr. James Hamilton Lash gave the opening invo- 
cation followed with piano solos by Tolca Tolces ; 
Dedication, Schumann-Liszt, and Arabesque on the 
"Beautiful Blue Danube," Schutz-Evler. 

The president then gave her opening message of 
the club year. . . . Claiming that there could never 
be growth without change, she asked that the members 
of the club be friendly toward any changes that 
might have been made by the directors and the presi- 
dent for the welfare of the club, and also asked that 
thought be given this year to closer community co- 
operation with the other civic bodies in Hollywood, as 
they had always co-operated with the Woman's Club, 
The president briefly outlined the work of the sec- 
tions of the club and announced any changes in them. 

A group of songs was then given by Flora Myers 
Engel: "Summertime," Ward-Stephens; "Devotion." 
Strauss; and "Will o' the Wisp," Stross. As an en- 
core she gave "The Little Brown Bear." 

Following the program the members adjourned to 
the Lounge, where a reception was held, with the 
president and her board of directors receiving. In 
appreciation of her work with the Hollywood Bowl, 
Mrs. J. J. Carter was honor guest, bringing with her 
Mrs. Lillian Burmingham, president of the State 
Federated Music Clubs, and Mrs. Florence French, 
editor of the Chicago "Music Leader." 

Striving to aid in community problems, as was 
stressed by the president, Mrs. Charles Richmond 
in her opening address, the Child Welfare section of 
the club has undergone changes and expansion. This 
section of the club, open to outsiders as well as club ^ 
members, has the welfare of the rising generation at 
heart, realizing that in them are to be found the 
future citizens of this country. More and more the 



GLEASON'S 
PARLIAMENTARY DIGEST 

The Digest was written by a woman who has been 
for seven years the National Superintendent of Par- 
liamentary Law for the Woman's Christian Temper-- 
aiice Union ; she was for four years Parliamentarian 
of the Los Angeles District Federation of Women's 
Clubs, and is now Parliamentarian for seven differ- 
ent organization and has had much experience in 
teaching and presiding. Mrs. Gleason knows the 
needs of our women and wrote the Digest, to be 
used as a text as well as reference book, for the pur- 
pose of making it easier for our women to study and 
understand parliamentary procedure. The Digest is 
based upon "Robert's Rules of Order Revised." 
Revised Edition, $2.00. 

If your book-store does not carry the Digest, send 
direct to the author. 

MRS. I. W. GLEASON 
110 West 30th Street Los Angeles, Calif. 



modern mother realizes the importance of an early 
start in correct habits as well as physique. That is 
what the Nursery School being established by the 
Woman's Club of Hollywood is trying to do, to help 
each individual mother study and train her children of 
the runabout age. Individual and group problems 
will be discussed, child health and mental hygeine, 
correct posture and exercises, right mental attitude 
and habits are to be studied. Each child will receive 
a thorough physical examination on entering the 
school, whose enrollment is limited to 30 children. An 
ideal playroom will be installed to demonstrate how 
children are these days to get valuable training even 
while at play. 

A group of specialists in child psychology and 
mental hygeine will help in the school: Mrs. Re- 
bekah Earle, formerly of the Merrill Palmer School 
of Detroit and now of the Los Angeles Public Schools, 
with Miss Julia Tappin and Miss Anne Raymond, 
both formerly of the American Child Health Associa- 
tion of Washington, D. C. 

Dr. J. D. Dunshee, Director of Child Welfare Divi- 
sion of the City Board of Health, has charge of the 
Nursery School. The school of the Woman's Club 
of Hollywood is the first of a group of demonstration 
schools for mothers and little children which the 
City Health Department is opening. Dr. Mary Hess 
Brown, of the Child Welfare Division of the Los 
Angeles County Health Department, is chairman of 
the Child Welfare and Public Health Committee of 
the Woman's Club of Hollywood, the Nursery School 
being but one of its activities. Dr. Hannah Beatty 
of the Juvenile Court is vice-chairman of the com- 
mittee. 

Another part of the Child Welfare work is for 
the infants, the children under two years of age. 
Examinations are held each week to determine how 
well and strong the babies are and to advise the 
mothers in feeding, clothing, bathing, and prevention 
of disease. 

The entire program of the Child Welfare Depart- 
ment is lined up with that of the city, county, state 
and nation and the General Federation of Woman's 
Clubs. As soon as possible the various study groups 
outlined in the program will be started. In the mean- 
time a fine foundation of physical, mental and moral 
value is being offered all mothers, which the Woman's 
Club of Hollywood is sponsoring. 

The Public Health Committee is joined with the 
Child Welfare Committee and is stressing the value 
of good milk to the child. Through the courtesy of 
the Adohr Stock Farms an inspection of the dairy 
with the method of producing certified milk will be 
made by the club members and friends on Saturday, 
October 3L Busses will be provided to take the 
guests to the farms and refreshments will be served. 

Wednesday, November 18, the Child Welfare and 
Public Health Committee will present Dr. Miriam Van 
Waters, author of "Youth in Conflict," as chief 
speaker at the club luncheon. Heads of various social 
welfare and civic organizations will be guests of 
honor. Every Thursday afternoon the Child Welfare 
Section of the club hold their school and examination 
as outlined. 



Page 10 



The CLUBWOMAN 



Jllllllllllllllll 



llllllillllllliiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiii«iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiii|||||^ 



Mrs. Edijjard A. Tufts, Chairman of Press 



Eight j'ears ago a group of women from the Ebell 
Club of Los Angeles, convinced that the club motto, 
'I Serve," meant something more tangible than senti- 
ment, formed a Social Service Committee which met 
weekly to sew for the unfortunates of the city. This 
group of women kept in close touch with the institu- 
tions of the community, learning what was being 
done for social betterment. Through the activities of 
this committee the members became interested in the 
women whose bodies were worn and whose spirits 
were weary. In December, 1917, through the co- 
operation of Miss Lillian B. Flanders and the Board 
of the Methodist Hospital, Ebell became the owner of 
a small cottage and a large lot on 95th Street which 
was named Ebell Rest Cottage, where during the 
first year twenty-five women were sustained and com- 
forted through the trying period of convalescence. 
Mrs. William Read, now the president of the Ebell 
Club, was the first chairman of the Ebell Rest Cot- 
tage Association. Her vision was so clear and her 
ideals for the work so high that during her three years 
in office she and her committee established, not an 
institution, but a real home where handicapped women 
were helped back to useful lives. Those who have 
followed in the work have maintained the same spirit 
of friendly helpfulness. 

In 1923 a new cottage was built at 135 North Park 
View Street, a beautiful building with accommodations 
for fourteen women, where last year one hundred 
sixteen women received Ebell's hospitality and, 
through rest and happy surroundings, were restored 
to health and courage. 

Only a part of the financial support is supplied by 
the Ebell treasury, the rest of the money comes from 
individual club members who have joined the associa- 
tion and from benefit parties given throughout the 
year. The goal set by those interested in the work is 
for every member of the Ebell Club to become a mem- 
ber of the Rest Cottage Association, each contributing 
one dollar a year. Besides owning this desirable 
pioperty, free from debt, the association has an en- 
dowment fund of $10,000 which will be augmented 
each year. 

One of the strongest and most useful committees in 
this work is the "Follow Up" Committee which keeps 
track of the women after they leave the Cottage — 
helping them secure positions, straightening out finan- 
cial tangles, advising and watching over them as only 
some true friend could. Women from all walks of 
life have been the guests at the cottage, young girls 
who have broken under the strain of clerking for 
years in basement stores or from overwork in school ; 
professional women whose work has been too heavy; 
mothers who need to recuperate from an illness or an 
operation, and older women to whom life has been 
hard. All who have needed it have been cared for 
and have gone out into the world again protected 
and encouraged by the faithful members of the "Fol- 
low Up" Committee. 

Practical Relief 

From the same Social Service Committee sprang the 
group which is now called the Practical Relief. The 
women meet every Friday to sew and to give aid 
to those who need it. The work is all constructive 
and not pauperizing, as the cases are investigated 
and only those who really are in need are aided. 



EBELL PHILANTHROPIES 

A trained dressmaker gives her services so that no 
garment is given away that has not been fitted to the 
individual, who therefore has the happy feeling of 
being well dressed. Last year twenty-five girls in 
school and college were given complete outfits, consist- 
ing of two suits of underwear, two underslips, two 
nightgowns, three pairs of stockings, shoes, two wash 
dresses, one woolen dress, one evening or afternoon 
dress, a skirt and a sweater, coat and hat. Besides 
this graduation dresses were made for three girls. 

The guests of Rest Cottage are given any assistance 
they need and are often supplied with clothes, some- 
times with whole outfits which enable them to re- 
enter the business world with confidence and self- 
respect. The Disabled Veterans of the World War, 
Post I, have received the attention of the Practical 
Relief Committee and many of their families have 
been helped with clothing and even food. 

Last year 5606 garments were distributed, 828 were 
new clothes made by women of the committee and 
many of the others were mended or remodeled. The 
committee has just finished making 48 outfits for the 
children of Santa Barbara, 196 garments, and have 
sent them to the northern city with assurance of /ym- 
pathy and friendship. 




Mrs. JViUtam Read, president of the Ebell Club 

—Photo by Witzel 



NOVEMBER, 1925 



Page 11 



Scholarships 

Previous to 1920 the Ebell Club had given scholar- 
ships to a few girls when some special need arose, 
but there was no well defined purpose in the giving. 
In that year a committee was formed with a definite 
policy and it was added to the regular activities of 
the club. The exceptional girl, one who stands high 
in her classes and has college credits, has been chosen 
as the type of girl who will gain the most and give 
back the most in the form of service to her commun- 
ity. She must not only exhibit a high mentality, but 
integrity, energy, and good health. Those girls who 
are deficient, or mentally handicapped, have the sym- 
pathy of many people and are often helped along 
the way; but the girl with high ideals and a vigorous 
mind is never pitied but admired and is usually left 
to make her own way. It is for these girls who show 
potential leadership that the Scholarship Committee is 
working, feeling that they will be of great benefit to 
our community if they are educated. 

At first only high school girls were chosen ; but so 
few had their purpose in life well defined that now 
most of the girls are selected from the universities. 
These girls are given $15.00 every month and, al- 
though the amount seems small, it is enough to keep 
these brilliant young students in their classes instead 
of allowing them to drop out of school and start work 
behind a counter. 

Five years ago the Scholarship Committee, with 
Mrs. Hot Johnson as the first chairman, started with 
three girls and the work has grown until this year 
fourteen girls are receiving Ebell scholarships. Part 
of this money comes from the club treasury and part 
from interested members, some of whom are helping 
in a small way; but four are given the money for 
entire scholarships, while others are given $100.00 
aa a memorial to some dear one, most of them in 
loving memory of their mothers. This money is held 
in an endowment fund, which now is $11,500. Only 
the interest is used. The Benefits Committee, through 
its entertainments, has aided this fund greatly. 

That the Scholarship Committee has shown care and 
wisdom in the awarding of scholarships is shown by 
the cases of two young women who held scholarships 
until they graduated a year or so ago. They are both 
teaching now and one of them has entirely repaid the 
amount she had received, while the other is repaying 
at the rate of $15.00 a month, although this was not 
required of them. Other girls are showing their 
appreciation as soon as they become earners by help- 
ing some friend or sister gain an education. 

The persona! interest taken by these understanding 
women of the committee in the girls is a source of en- 
couragement and inspiration to them, while the women 
themselves are doubly repaid in the knowledge that 
this constructive work is making leading citizens. 

The Ebell Club has concentrated most of its atten- 
tion on these three foregoing philanthropies, but that 
does not mean that it has no interest in or is not 
assisting any other charitable work. A new depart- 
ment of Social Welfare has been formed this year 
which not only includes Rest Cottage, Practical Relief 
and Scholarships, but has a committee on Social Sur- 
, vey which is ever on the alert to see what is being 
done for the good of the community and giving Ebell's 
co-operation where it is needed. There are commit- 
tees on Industrial Relations and Public Institutions 
which are doing good work. The Ebell Juniors, under 
the leadership of their president, Mrs. Loren Bab- 
cock, are devoting their energies to practical work in 
Child Welfare. 




.^,i'^ -," -•■'-isi^''-^''" ..';^"'^'<iii^Sil^'S.\^^' 




Mrs. Loren Babcock, President of the Ebell Juniors 

Boye Portrctit 



Our Club N.^me 

As so many people ask the question, "What does 
the name EBELL mean?" we have taken the follow- 
ing explanation from the year book of the Ebell of 
Los Angeles: 

Adrian Ebell, born September 30, 1840, in Ceylon, 
of mixed German-British-Dutch ancestry; brought to 
America while very young by an older sister who had 
married an American missionary, gaining his educa- 
tion at Easthampton and Yale, and later, at German 
Universities ; dying at the age of thirty-seven, after 
seeing the ideal conceived in boyhood well on the 
way towards realization; may be regarded as an 
international figure. 

Always deeply interested in a wider horizon for 
women everywhere, through the extension of oppor- 
tunities for higher education in all lines tending to 
the enlarged sympathy that results from the assimila- 
tion of broad culture when pursued with the ultimate 
motive of unselfish service, Dr. Ebell initiated the 
organization of study classes for women in the east- 
ern part of our country and, after a visit to Cali- 
fornia, was returning to Europe to further his plans 
for an international college for women, when he was 
stricken with fever that resulted in his death. 

While a student at Yale, his brilliant personality 
and rare courage attracted the attention of a man of 
large wealth who had no son. Given his choice be- 
tween the lure of all that belongs to the sole heir of 
a vast fortune and the struggle and deprivation at- 



Page 12 



The CLUBWOMAN 



tached to carving his own career, but on condition that 
another name be added to that of Ebell, he elected to 
keep his honored birthright unsullied and to tread the 
path of self-denial. This he chose rather than to risk, 
through the temptations frequently accompanying 
great wealth, possibly belittling of a name that had 
stood through generations for fidelity to ideals of 
loyalty, truth and honor. 

Such was the man to whose memory the Ebell 
Clubs of California — among which The Ebell of Los 
Angeles is third in order of organization — chose to 
build living monuments by taking his name and carry- 
ing on his work through the education of women. 



The Ebell of Los Angeles is prepared this year to 
take an active part in all departments of the Federa- 
tion and a strong and efficient committee has been or- 
ganized under Mrs. William L. Jones, Federation 
Secretary, and her assistant, Mrs. Sidney J. Parsons. 
The members of this committee are capable women, 
well versed in the line of work for which they have 
been chosen. They are Mrs. Lyman B. Stookey, 
American Citizenship ; Mrs. William H. Smith, Co- 
operation with Ex-Service Men and Women; Mrs. 
George A. Eastman, Education; Mrs. A. S. C. Forbes. 
California History and Landmarks; Mrs. C. B. Eyer, 
Conservation; Mrs. H. F. Boesche. Home Economics; 
Mrs. W. W. Fisher and Mrs. Claude W. Kesler, Mo- 
tion Pictures; Mrs. F. E. Lamberton, Art; Mrs. Ralph 
Louis Byron, Literature; Miss Elizabeth H. Leigh, 
Music; Mrs. William C. Warmington, Drama; Mrs. 
Charles S. McKelvey, Legislation; Miss Frederica 
deLaguna, International Relations; Mrs. Charles E. 
Crary, Public Welfare. ^^ 



SANTA MONICA BAY 
WOMAN'S CLUB 

By Florence Co=u:an 

Opening Monday, October 5, with a luncheon fol- 
lowed by a delightful afternoon of music given by 
the Zoellner Quartet, the Santa Monica Bay Woman's 
Club has caught the step and swung into the march- 
ing line of women's clubs for the year. A happy 
spirit pervaded the opening meeting; gay little verses 
of greeting to old and new members, written by the 
club president, Mrs. N. S. Duckies, were sung by 
members of the club chorus. In her address of wel- 
come Mrs. Duckies said: "There is no fellowship 
that surpasses that of congenial workers,' which may 
well be taken as the keynote of the club for the year. 

The chairman of the Literature Section, Mrs. A. C. 
Barke, has arranged in addition to the regular bi- 
monthly meetings, when reports of new books will be 
given, a series of all-day meetings at the clubhouse 
when the members will sew for the benefit of the 
Fall Festival and other club activities. 



A new undertaking — -the club has decided to spon- 
sor the Girl Scouts of the Bay District. Feeling that 
this work should receive the help of women's organ- 
izations, the club is putting the work upon a firm 
basis. 

Miss Mae Armstrong, program chairman, is work- 
ing the Monday afternoon programs out along inter- 
esting lines. October 19 was designated Spanish day. 
At a Spanish luncheon presided over by Mrs. A. X. 
Wilmot, Mrs. A. S. C. Forbes, District chairman of 
California History and Landmarks, talked on the 
preservation of the precious remains of a romantic 
past. At 2:30, Grace Hyde Trine read one of her 
pageants, "Hidden Gold," which deals with the ad- 
venturous days of the Dons; and Grace Wood Jess, 
in Spanish costume, sang a group of old Spanish 
songs. 

Mrs. J. B. Lorbeer, District President of the Cali- 
fc rnia Federation, for nineteen years a member of the 
Santa Monica club and one of its past presidents, 
was the guest of the club at luncheon, October 12, 
and gave a direct and stirring message from the dis- 
trict. 

One of the most ambitious projects at present is 
the presentation of a series of three concerts in the 
Bay District by the Los Angeles Symphony Orchestra. 
The bringing of the orchestra is an enormous under- 
taking which the club has carried through to success 
for the past three years and which the enthusiatic 
leader in this work, Mrs. J. G. Braun, declares is 
the biggest thing, almost, that a club can do. 



LOS ANGELES CITY 
TEACHERS CLUB 

Ann Davis Clark, Press Chairman 

The Los Angeles City Teachers Club again takes 
up the activities of a school year. The new president. 
Miss Gladys Evelyn Moorhead, has held two meet- 
ings with her Board of Directors, at which much 
business was transacted and some changes of policy 
outlined which promise a very busy year. 

The Club is the property and responsibility of its 
members. Its officers exist to co-ordinate, expedite and 
to direct the life activities of the Club, as expressed 
in the small sub-groups which arise through com- 
munity of need or interest. 

What are these needs and interests? The needs 
are mostly protective, concerned with our self-preser- 
vation individually and as a unified professional 
group in a society composed of innumerable large 
groups like our own. Our interests are constructive 
and expressive, concerned with the development of 
this art and science called Education, and of its pro- 
fessional technique called Teaching. 



Standard dry goods of one quality only — the best. 
New fashions daily augment our assortments. 



SEVENTH STREET AT OLIVE 



NOVEMBER. 1925 



Page 13 



UNIVERSITY BOOK CLUB 

By Shirley Coleman, Press Chairman 
One of the most enjoyable affairs in the history 
of the University Book Club was the informal re- 
ception held Tuesday. October 13 at the home of Mrs. 
M. A. Lockhart, 1245 Van Ness Avenue, in honor of 
the president, Mrs. Annie F. Fulton, and past presi- 
dents, two of whom, Mrs. Pauline C. Brady and 
Miss Frances A. Everett, were present. 

Mrs. Charles L. Bogue delighted the guests with 
several vocal selections. Mrs. Alice E. Harrison gave 
readings from Bret Harte's poems, and Mrs. Lock- 
hart's two little granddaughters charmed everyone 
with interpretative costume dances. 



SOROPTIMIST CLUB 

By Bertha M. Just, Press Chairman 
After a two months' vacation the Soroptimist Club 
resumed their meetings on Tuesday, September 1, at 
the Biltmore. This first meeting was a "get-together" 
meeting. There was a sort of coming back to school 
air about the occasion. The bell rang and we re- 
sponded eager and ready to start a new year of club 
work. 

Our first program of the season was presented on 
September 8 by Grace S. Stoermer, who planned a 
California Admission Day program fitting to cele- 
brate the Diamond Jubilee recently held in San 
Francisco on California's seventy-fifth birthday. Miss 
Stoermer made a regular party of this day. It was 
given in the ballroom of the Biltmore and many 
guests were invited. Gertrude C. Maynard, our 
president, explained the "Why" of our club before 
introducing Grace Stoermer, who began the program 
with Anna Dempsey's toast to California. This was 
followed by everyone singing "My Country 'Tis of 



Thee," led by Mrs. W. E. Mabee, State Chairman of 
Music, California Federation of Women's Clubs. 
There were brief talks by Dr. E. K. Lickeley, who 
represented Mayor Cryer; Mr. D. P. Morris of the 
Chamber of Commerce; Charles F. Lummis and Hon. 
Joseph Ford. These men all paid their tribute to 
California. Mrs. A. S. C. Forbes, chairman of Los 
Angeles District History and Landmarks Division, 
California Federation of Women's Clubs, told us the 
story of the poppy, which translated means "The 
Cup of Gold." The musical numbers were contri- 
buted by Elizabeth Lloyd Toohey, who sang two 
beautiful California songs written by Gertrude Ross 
and accompanied by her. Gay Imlah sang two num- 
bers by Carl Bronson, "My California" and "The 
Sun Shines Bright in California," with Mildred San- 
ger House at the piano. The program ended with 
the singing of F. B. Silverwood's famous song "Cali- 
fornia." 

Gertrude C. Maynard, our Club president, pre- 
sided over the meeting on September 15. She gave 
us an interesting report of the Sixth Annual Conven- 
tion of the California Federation of Business and 
Professional Women's Clubs held at San Jose, Sep- 
tember 10, 11 and 12. She said the keynote of this 
convention was "Come, Let Us Reason Together." 
C. Gordon Whitnall, Director of the Los Angeles City 
Planning' Commission, told us some things that we 
had never known about Los Angeles. He said if Los 
Angeles is beautiful it is beautiful in spite of us not 
because of us. He said if we are anxious for quantity 
instead of quality, Pekin, China, can beat us entirely 
when it comes to population. Our boundaries are def- 
initely decided because he have an ocean on one side, 
mountains on another with San Gabriel drainage basin 
oil another, so he thought it behooved us to look ahead, 
controlling our sub-divisions and highways with a 
thought to the future so that we will allow space for 



STOP 

Before You Buy Your Fall and Winter Clothing 

GO 

4 

to the 

O. W. Thomas Company 

and consult them about reconditioning the garments you have. 



Main Office and Plant 
In Our Oinn Building 

2207-9 MAPLE AVENUE 

WEstmore 2059 




Branch Office 

2706 W. SEVENTH ST. 
Near Rampart 

WAshington 1511 



LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 

Our Cars Call in Pasadena and So. Pasadena Tuesdays and Fridays 



Page 14 



The CLUBIVOMAN 



our growing population. Mr. Whitnall also told us 
that Los Angeles has the largest area in parks per cap- 
ita of any city in the world and that three years ago 
Los Angeles had the highest percentage of single fam- 
ily residences in the world. He regretted that so much 
natural beauty had been destroyed by the city, not 
intentionally, but because there had been such pur- 
poseless planning. And in ending he added, "For a 
city beautiful is only attained when order is added 
to beauty." 

Madame Grace Whistler, a former grand opera 
star in Europe as well as America, presented her 
pupil, Olive Coles, in song selections. Miss Coles 
rendered her solos in a beautiful manner, which 
helped to make this program a great success. 

On September 29 the club held a Members' Day 
program, given by Sylvia Harding, Anna V. Green, 
Ida E. Schmadel and Mary M. Russell. Sylvia Hard- 
ing, the violinist and teacher, started this program by 
playing for us in her usual captivating manner. She 
was followed by Anna V. Green, who told us some of 
her secrets for success in running a woman's hotel. 
Mary M. Russell talked about her Campfire Girls, 
of which she is the Director. My business, said Mrs. 
Russell, is girls, and she declares the stock is going 
up, no matter what we hear to the contrary. Ida E. 
Schmadel convinced us that even a grocery business 
could be made interesting. 

October 6, Elizabeth Bowman Tomlinson gave a 
Fire Prevention program. James A. Tomlinson gave 
a five-minute talk on "Fire Insurance" and Reynold 
E. Blight spoke on "Fire Prevention." Adelaide 
Beard Brewer played three piano numbers which com- 
pleted a fine program. 

"Investments and Speculations" was the theme of 
the program for October 13. This subject was skil- 
fully handled by W. Maxwell Burke, Ph. D. of Colum- 
bia University and now connected with the University 
of California. Mr. Burke said "A promoter isn't 
necessarily a crook; he is an adventurer, a man with 
a vision, an inner urge." And he added that all great 
inventors are promoters in fact. Leon Becker, a won- 
derful child artist, ended this program by playing two 
numbers on the piano, including the "Liebestraurae" 
by Liszt and "Perpetuum Mobile" by Von Weber. 



SOUTH SIDE EBELL CLUB 

By Edna Grace Cooke, Sub Press Chairman 
South Side Ebell Club greets the District. 
From the fact that no message was received from 
us during the summer months, one might be forgiven 
for gaining the impression that South Side is asleep — 
but an exact opposite state of affairs is in existence; 
for though the summer months is our "hibernating 
season," so to speak — the board at least was awake 
and active; as each month it held its regular meet- 
ings and transacted that amount of business, that 
when club proper opened the first part of October, 
the business of this regime was as thoroughly settled 
and in such working trim, that the club slipped into 
action without a jar. 

Kate Thimgan, our new president, has selected 
"Conservation and Efficiency" as her slogan, and if the 
comprehensive manner in which she has taken hold 
means anything. South Side Ebell is in for a progres- 
sive and extremely active year. "A Club Home" is 
our war cry, and from the manner in which each sec- 
tion is conducting Itself, and from their numerous 
money-making plans, it would seem that such a thing 
would soon materialize into something beside a long 
cherished dream. 

Notable ariiong the activities planned for this pur- 




Kate Thimgan, President of South Side Ebell Club 

pose is the bazaar to be given November 12, 13 and 
14. Lily Peterson, Ways and Means chairman, has 
her committee and working force so well organized, 
and has imbued them with such a spirit of enthusi- 
asm, that each one is viein^ with the other in giving 
card parties, luncheons, and various other money- 
making schemes, to create a working fun for their 
respective booths. 

The club was opened this fall with an affair that 
:s a great deviation from South Side's usual opening 
meetina;s; for the newly organized Jinior Auxiliary 
cne evening gave a playlet which was directed and 
supervised by Kathryn Engelhorn, Dramatic Curator. 
This playlet was preceded by a musical program 
also given by the auxiliary and such a number of 
club husbands were in evidence that aU considered the 
innovation a success. 

The first formal meeting of the cuiienr club year 
was held October 8, at which time both speaker and 
artist appearing set a precedent whicii if lived up 
to will keep the program committei! on the tiptoe 
throug;h the balance of the year. 

At the first h'ncheon — given, lliis month, in honor 
of the new officers — Agnes Zuccarr.i acted as toast 
mistress and she with her usual sparkling wit, made 
it easy for those responding to follow her clever lead, 
in toasting, roasting and otherwise thoroughly during 
the incoming regime. 

South Side is not selfish in thit she is not ttriving 
to keep her talented members to herself, for she has 
furnished her share of State and District Federation 
chairmen for this year and holds herself in readiness 
to co-operate with the District when called upon. 



NOVEMBER, 1925 



Page /5 



WOMEN'S UNIVERSITY CLUB 

By Mrs. A. M. Marsh, Acting Chairman Publicity 

Next to finding the clubhouse freshly cleaned and 
in perfect order for the new year, the Women's Uni- 
versity Club is enjoying the prospert of an intensely 
interesting year. The new president, Mrs. Lawrence 
L Larrabee, has already achievrd maiked success 
in committee organization. (Affiliation ConuiiitteC; 
Miss Helen Moore; Benefits, Mrs. Charles F. Turner; 
Door, Miss Katherine Acer; Finance, Mrs. George 
De Garmo; Hospitality, Miss Florence Bischoff; 
House, Mrs. Palmer H. Cook; Membership, .Mrs. 
George P. Olsen; Program, Miss Katherine Carr; 
Printing, Miss Adelaide Hovey; Public AfFairs, Mrs. 
Malbone W. Graham; Publicity, Mrs. A. M. Marsh, 
Acting Chairman; Scholarship, Mrs. Joseph Sniffi-n). 
A large percentage of the members who have previ- 
ously been inactive or indifferent to club affairs now 
exhibit much enthusiasm in the opportunity for service. 

A hundred committee members met, recently, at al- 
fresco breakfast in the beautiful garden and planned 
programs for all teas, b.idge lunclicuns. dinners, in- 
ternational relations round tables, and an evening of 
dancing each month with husbands iind friends as in- 
vited guests. Mrs. Larrabee's slogan seems to be: 
"There's a job for everybody; doa't miss your 
thrince." 

Saturday Luncheon 

At the luncheon Saturday, October 3, when Frieda 
Peycke was soloist, the members received several sur- 
prising announcements. lu the first place the Board of 
Directors has figured out the completion of paying 
off the mortgage. The Finance Committee recom- 
mended to the members that the constiintioT i e 
changed from the present 200 limitatio.i for life 
memberships (the plan by which the property was 
f.urchased), to 150. 

There are plans on foot, also, for enlarging the 
interest of the members in motion picture previewing 
?nd in the weekly Saturday matinee for children, 
piovlding a large number of chaperone-, to be on 
duty at the theatres. This field of activ-'y was first 
inspired, largely, by Mrs. Roger Sterret and is now 
being associated with the work of the Los Angeles 
District, California Federation of Women's Clubs, 
through the efforts of Mrs. John Vruwmk 

The soft gray walls of the lower floor provide now 
a most refreshing background for the present art 
exhibit, just received through the courtesy of Mr. 
John Hubble Rich, who is a member of the California 
Art Association and the posse->sor of manv prizes 
si)d medals. Portraits and figure painting are his 
specialty and the Club deeply appreciates the loan of 
some of his finest paintings, including a very hand- 
some portrait of President Van Kleinsmid. 

New and helpful are the Thursday night dinners, 
for by tradition it is maids' night out and now the 
busy housewife can take the family along to the 
Club. Miss Madeline Veverka, Supervisor of Primary 
Education and Kindergartens in Los Angeles City 
Schools, spoke on "Your Child and Mine" at the last 
meeting. 

Round Table 

The International Round Table is meeting bi- 
monthly; a drama, a literature and a music section 
are already under way once a m'nth. 

A most enthusiastic and merry pre-Hallowe'en 
party, with Mrs. John Barrow as hostess, on the eve- 
ning of Friday, October 16, was the first of the bene- 
fits for the year ; that with a second benefit, a lunch- 
eon bridge on Wednesday, October 21, under Mrs. 
George H. Clark and Mrs. Hugh Browt^, have started 
our furnishing fund well on its way. 

Mary Sinclair Crawford, the new Dean of Women 



BARKER BROS.' 

Ivemoval 

ALE 

..and YOU! 

^JOR YOU 

— this outstanding sale! 

YOURS — the opportunity for 
choice from the three mil- 
lion dollars' worth of furniture 
and home furnishings now at 
sale prices. 

ALREADY, hundreds— yes 
thousands of homeshaveshared 
these Removal Sale economies. 
For you, too, these unprece- 
dented values ! 

THE goal is set — to open the 
new store with all new, never- 
before displayed merchandise. 
AU now in stock must be 
cleared. Selected groups — 
sometimes the entire stock — 
from every department • — at 
SAVINGS! Economies you 
cannot afiord to lose. 



YOURS 
NOW! 



the opportunity 



BARKER BROS, 

COMPLETE FURNISHERS OP SUCCESSFUL HOMES 
BROADWAY BETWEEN SEVENTH AND EIGHTH 



Page 16 



The CLUBWOMAN 



at U. S. C, was luncheon speaker at the luncheor: 
on the third Tuesday, her subject being "The Poi-H 
of View." Other Deans of Women throughout South- 
ern California were honor ^"^hests wifii Dean Craw- 
ford that day. 

Dr. Lois Meek, National Education Chairman of 
the Association of American University Women, 
working also under the Rockefeller Foundation, comes 
to us on November 17. Her particular emphasis is 
upon the "Pre-School Age Child." We are to keep 
open house for her at the clubhouse ior conferences 
during the day. At 4 o'clock in the afternoon there 
is to be a reception — at 5 Dr. Meek will speak — 
a; 6:30 dinner will be served, and after that educa- 
tion chairmen from the A. A. U. W. branches in 
Southern California will meet with Dr. Meek. 



THE WOMEN'S TWENTIETH 
CENTURY CLUB 

By Mrs. Kyle D. Palmer 

The first meeting of the Women's Twentieth Cen- 
tury Club of Eagle Rock of the 1925-26 season was 
one of the most delightful and colorful events in the 
history of the club. Mrs. R. L. McNitt, the newly 
elected president, presided ^'t the luncheon and the 
afternoon meeting with a/ combination of grace, 
charm, and dignified poise, introducing the speakers 
with an air of confidence and graciousness that left 
nothing to be desired. After the luncheon, Mrs. Mc- 
Nitt introduced her official family and called upon 
chairmen of the various sections to outline in a one 
minute talk their plans for the year's work. At tl:e 
afternoon session, Mrs. A. R. Rose, a member of the 
Program committee, introduced Charles Wakefield 
Cadman who was greeted by an enthusiastic audience. 
An afternoon of music followed. Both Mr. Cadman 
and Mr. George Gramlick who assisted Mr. Cadman 
were most generous in their response to encores, re- 
turning time after time at the demand of their hearers. 
The clubhouse was decorated with fall blossoms and 
the patio was a bower of dahlias which had been 
brought for exhibition purposes by local dahlia en- 
thusiasts. 

Throughout the summer, interest in club events has 
been sustained by a series of charmingly arranged 
parties; the first was a club breakfast held at the club- 
house in August and followed by a book review and 
an afternoon of cards. A fashion show, luncheon and 
card party at Oakmont Country club called forth an 
attendance of 150 in September. Following these social 
activities, a spirit of co-operation and joyous endeavor 
seems to prevade the new regime. In the departments, 
the desire seems to be not only for the success •of the 
'section itself but that it may become a constructive 
force in the club and in the community. Several con- 



crete examples are at hand: Mrs. Mary Fisk insists 
that not only club members but all interested residents 
of the valley may attend without cost, the study sec- 
tion of which she is chairman; Mrs. L. E. Hammond, 
chairman of the music section, is attempting to procure 
the school auditorium an evening early in December 
of old-fashioned music so that not only club members 
but any resident of the community may enjoy the eve- 
ning's entertainment which is being planned. 

Mrs. Paul Elderkin, vice-chairman of the music sec- 
tion, is planning many novel details for the December 
musical. The stage setting is to be an old-fashioned 
heme with a house-party in progress, Hugo Kirchoffer, 
director, playing host. Among his guests will be many 
well-known, old time characters, notably Jennie Lind, 
who will be portrayed by Juanita West. 

Another department head with a philanthropic turn 
of mind looking toward the betterment of the com- 
munity is Mts. a. G. Reily, past president, chairman 
of American Citizenship. Many worth while plans 
will be carried out in her department. 

In every section of the club, the underlying theme is 
The Home. One section is devoted exclusively to The 
American Home. Mrs. J. C. Kraus is chairman. 
Civic Betterment, the Bible, Education, Motion Pic- 
tures — all reflect directly back to the home, and the 
beginning of all. Child Welfare. Mrs. B. F. Hersom 
has arranged a program that touches every phase of 
child life from the baby clinic to a complete course in 
paidology. And sustaining every section, standing 
firmly behind every movement toward local and public 
betterment, lending her talents and strength in behalf 
of every chairman, is the president. Her inspiration 
and ability assure marked achievement for the Women's 
Twentieth Century Club during her term of office. 
Success to her I 



SHAKESPEARE CLUB OF 
PASADENA 

It is estimated that about 4000 people passed 
through the gates of the Spanish fiesta given on the 
afternoon and evening of October 17 by the Shakes 
peare Club of Pasadena at the beautiful foothill 
rancho of Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Hahn. The gen- 
eral chairman, Mrs. Lewis H. Turner is being warmly 
congratulated not only for the artistic and social suc- 
cess of the affair but also for the financial aid it will 
bring to the liquidation of the debt on the new build- 
ing. Mrs. Frederick Gillmor, treasurer of the club 
estimates the sum as approaching $3500.00. 

As one would naturally expect at a Spanish fiesta, 
the place was a riot of color. Gay booths lined the 
walks surrounding the great log cabin of the Hahn's. 
L'nderneath a huge live oak, tea tables were placed 



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NOVEMBER, 1925 



Page 17 



where Mrs. J. H. Dorn and her committee presided. 
In the pergola built throughout the length of the rose 
garden, Mrs. C. F. M. Stone and her committee served 
a delicious supper in which Spanish dishes predomi- 
nated, and club husbands clad in red scarfs and som- 
breros, acted as festive and courageous waiters, to 
over 1200. 

On the expanse of lawn before the house was a plat- 
form where a program featuring Madame Real, an 
orchestra of mandolins and guitars, a tiny Spanish 
dances, some stunning Charleston dancers, was under 
the direction of Mr. and Mrs. George Stanley. 

Then there were popcorn stands, soft drink stands, 
fish ponds and lovely flower girls who sold balloons, 
and strolling minstrels, who also loitered underneath 
the deodars and did their best to sing one's heart 
away and nearly did it too. And there was dancing 
of course, to the music of Sciot's band while all the 
m.embers of the club were dressed in full Spanish 
regalia from gipsy to pirate and from peasant to 
Spanish princess. The prizes for the two most beau- 
tiful costumes went to Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Hahn, 
a exquisite blue ostrich feather fan and a gold cigar- 
ette case respectively. Mrs. Hahn's gown, a creation 
in light and dark blue was loaned by the Douglas 
Fairbank's studio as was also the wonderful gold 
gcwn worn by Mrs. Edwin H. Hahn, president of the 
club. These gowns were created for the production 
of "Don Q." Mrs. Lewis H. Turner's blonde beauty 
found a fitting setting in a gorgeous shawl costume 
loaned by the Grace Nicholson studios. 

Prominent on the north lawn was a group of gypsy 
tents in their priceless coverings of oriental rugs, 
lighted by bronze lamps which came from old Spain. 
Mrs. J. B. McCoy and Mrs. Philip M. Stone were 
in charge of this extremely picturesque and popular 
retreat. 

Other chairmen were Mesdames E. N. McAdam, 
A. J. Neimeyer, H. J. Spann, W. D. Gibson, R. C. 
Olrastead, H. E. Tabor, George Huntington, John 
McDonald, Robert Updyke, V. Bernard Herbst, A. R. 
Morris, Robert Fildew, Walter Krug, Brooks Millard, 
J. S. Pashgian, Clayton R. Taylor, L. E. Jarvis, Peter 
Oiban, J. S. White, Frank H. Seares, A. J. Wingard, 
Alfred Eggleston, F. A. H. Fysh, J. P. O'Mara, Harry 
Van Sittert, Fred D. Chamberlain, and the Misses 
Mary A. McCulloch and Ida J. Parkinson. 



"President's Day" opened the club year of the Shake- 
speare club of Pasadena, on the afternoon of October 
6. Mrs. Edwin F. Hahn who succeeds Mrs. Clayton 
R. Taylor as president of the club, in her initial ad- 
dress, emphasized the slogans of the national, state 
and district presidents. Adolph Tandler's quartette 
gave the musical program and a tea with Mrs. W. D. 
Dilworth and her committee pouring, followed a re- 
ception which Mrs. Hahn and her executive board 
held in the Great Hall to returning members. 



Some changes are noted in the new year books. 
Mrs. J. P. O'Mara heads an advertising committee. 
This committee will take over the duties previously 
assumed by the press committee. 

Dr. Margaret Carhart becomes the director of the 
Literature department which is a combination of the 
old book and magazine department with the English 
department. 

The Current Events department will be conducted 
by various members of the club in order to give a 
desirable opportunity for the praqtice in piiblic 
speaking. 

Frayne Williams is the new director of the Shake- 
speare department, taking the place of Anthony 
Blanks who is absent in Europe on his sabbatical 
leave. 




BULLOCKS 

S t o I- e 




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Page 18 



The CLUBWOMAN 



Margaret Goetz of Los Angeles is the new director 
of the music section. Mrs. C. A. Wolf remains as 
director of the Shakespeare singers. 

Mrs. Richard Blow is the chairman of a new sec- 
tion, the travelogue section. Members will study the 
geography of different countries, the routes and para- 
phernalia of travel. 



Mrs. George A. Daniells, who is vice-chairman of 
history and landmarks under District chairman, Mrs. 
A. S. C. Forbes, is a member of the history and land- 
marks commiteee and of the press committee of the 
Shakespeare club. Mrs. Daniells has been making his- 
tory for herself and her club by giving talks to 
various clubs on the "days and the pluck of '49'". 

"This is all a labor of love," says Mrs. Daniells, 
"all I get is my transportation expenses. My object is 
to collect old letters and diaries to get the clubwomen 
to preserve the stories of pioneers and to obtain photo- 
stat copies of old deeds, documents or photographs." 



ELSINORE WOMAN'S CLUB 

By Mrs. W. A. Rusk, Press Chairman 

During the summer months, members of the Elsinore 
Woman's club have watched the building of their new 
clubhouse, and the first meeting of the club year was 
an enthusiastic one. The meeting was held in the 
music room of the Club Inn, and Mrs. Henry Good- 
cell, of San Bernardino, State Vice President-at-large, 
was the speaker of the afternoon. Club Ideals was 
her subject. She stressed the responsibility of each 
member to assist the officers in making the club year 
a success, and to conform with the kindly spirit ex- 
pressed in the Club Collect. Tea was served and a 
social hour enjoyed. 



FRIDAY AFTERNOON CLUB 
OF ONTARIO 

One of the interesting affairs of the past month was 
the opening meeting of the Friday Afternoon club, first 
woman's organization in the city, at the Los Ser- 
ranos Country club when a delightful tea was served 
and the program vras given out of doors underneath 
ivy-covered trees. 

Holiday experiences, recounted in such a setting, 
gained au njiletl charrn and the club was fairly 
started on one of its iiilcjtsurg years. 

The Friday Afternoon club, founded when Ontario 
was still a colony, is the mother of several other 
women's organizations here. 

The Current Events club, with its large and un- 
limited membership, and its many assets, started as 
an outgrowth of the Friday club and the Ramblers 
club w.TS aho mothered by the older organization. 



AMERICAN UNIVERSITY 
STUDY CLUB 

By Mrs. B. E. Wilson, Press Chairman 
Our fourth regular meeting will be held at the 
home of the Press Chairman, Mrs. B. E. Wilson, on 
Valencia Street, during the temporary absence of the 
piesident, Mrs. J. B. Greene. 

A review of previous studies with questions on 
Americanism will be given by Mrs. Rev. J. B. Hill, 
of Shorb Ave., Los Angeles. 

Our club has been well represented at the Septem- 
ber and October President's Councils, with apprecia- 
tion, also shared the pride and attainment at the 
opening of the Echo Park Mother's Clubhouse, and 
are sending our quota to the Needle Work Guild of 
America. 



The Los Angeles 

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Salon 

ivith 

J. W. ROBINSON CO. 

UNDER the direct management of 
Miss Arden and her New York staff 
and offering the same specialized treat- 
ments that have made Miss Arden' s other 
salons internationally known. 

SEVENTH FLOOR 




HIGHLAND PARK EBELL 
CLUB 

By Mrs. George F. Cook, Press Chairman 

Club and home were eulogized in speeches and 
songs at the breakfast. October 6, -which was the 
opening event of Highland Park Ebell club. 

After greetings by the president, Mrs. Herbert Carr, 
expressing several wishes for the year, Mrs. John H. 
Foley, chairman of Public Affairs was introduced as 
toast-mistress. Mrs. Foley aroused much interest in 
her well arranged program which was introduced 
with appropriate lines, "Back to the Town," after 
vacation. Unity of effort tvas the theme of the toast 
assigned the president, Mrs. Herbert Carr. How 
large should this club be to best fulfil its motto, "To 
our club, loyalt}' — to the communit)-, wise sers'ice?" 
In her response to this question, Mrs. Dan Hammacfc, 
first vice-president, made the statement that "a large 
club gives weight in the federation, authority in the 
community, pull politically, and greater capacity for 
doing good." "A Morning Prayer," by Nixon Water- 
man was repeated by Mrs. George E. Paine, philan- 
thropy chairman in response to the theme, " 'Tis the 
spirit that quickeneth." Mrs. Charles Oden, soprano, 
sang "The Dearest Spot on Earth to Me" as a toast 
to the home. Mrs Loye Holmes Miller was her ac- 
companist. Mrs. Harry Louis Stroh, junior past presi- 
dent, now chairman of Civic Beauty in the club, told 
of the physical, mental and spiritual assets of this sec- 
tion of Los Angeles. Mrs. Foley's program was con- 
cluded with a reading, "The Knight's Toast," given 
by Mrs. Harry E. Lawrence. 

A surprise that received an oration was the singing 
by Mrs. Lewellyn C. Hall, soprano of a toast to the 
club, the words and music of which were written by 
the accompanist, Mrs. George B. Mier. 

The clubhouse was made attractive by masses of 
marigolds, dahlias and golden rod arranged by Mrs. 
R. E. Imhoff, chairman, pro tem, of the reception com- 
mittee and her helpers. The tables with their autumn 
flowers and place cards ornamented with the club 
monogram were arranged by Mrs. W. D. Craigmile, 
chairman and her Hospitality Committee and these 
ladies were also responsible for the palatable menu 
served. 

As the members took their places at the tables, Mrs. 
Ruth Towne Smith, pianist played a number of se- 
lections. 

The club emblem is a feature of the front cover. 
It is the result of the efforts of Mrs. O. J. Swegles, 
chairman, Miss Mary Schoonover and Mrs. Car! 
Plath. . 

The enlarged monthly program bulletin is also a 
welcome imprrovement as it gives opportunity for 
more printed matter with neatness and effectiveness. 
The program committee includes Mrs. C. R. Foote. 
chairman. Miss Bell Beatty, Mrs. John Foley, Mrs. 
W. R. Myers and Mrs. Harry E. Fisher] 

Mrs. J. R. Keough, house chairman, has been in- 
strumental in adding new dressing tables and many 
other necessary articles to improve and adorn the 
clubhouse. 

Through the chairman of art, Mrs. William J. 
Judson, twelve paintings and two etchings by Nell 
Brooker Mayhew were exhibited on the clubhouse 
walls throughout October. Several of these were 
sketched from the studio window of the artist at her 
home on Aldama street among the hills of Highland 
Park, and these were conceded to be works of special 
beautv. 




A soap of gentle refine- 
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A complexion soap that 
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Refresh your skin night 
and morning with a bath 
in Mission Bell. 



STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP OF THE 
CLUBWOMAN 

Publisher — E. M. Smith, Box 26, So. Pasadena 

Editor — Press Chairmen of Clubs Represented 

Business Manager — Katherine Smith, Box 26 

So. Pasadena 




Page 20 



The CLUBWOMAN 



TUESDAY AFTERNOON CLUB 
OF GLENDALE 

By Eva Daniels, Chairman of Press 

Dear Shipmates: 

All aboard for 1925-26! 

The ship will sail on Tuesday, October 13, at 12:15. 
Luncheon will be served on board. 

Many distinguished people have booked passage. 
The ship has been overhauled and is in splendid con- 
dition for a long voyage. The decks are all scrubbed 
clean and the galley spic and span with new lino- 
leum, new stoves, and a wonderful ice chest. 

A fine, new cook has been secured, who is most 
anxious to please the passengers. 

The crew has had a fine vacation and are ready for 
work. They have asked the ship's operator to radio 
this message to you: "Give loyalty and service, while 
you smile and be happy." 

The captain and officers, many of whom have 
worked all summer, are ready to serve you. They 
will welcome any suggestions or constructive criti- 
■ cism you may have to offer. If there are any cob- 
: webs of discontent hanging around, please throw them 
overboard as we do not want any seasick passengers 
on board and cobwebs certainly do cause seasickness. 

Let the bands play as we sail out of the harbor, and 
when the voyage is ended, may it please God to make 
this the best trip the good ship T. A. C. has ever had. 
Faithfully yours, 
(Signed) Gertrude 1. Montgomery, Captain. 

With the above splendid message delivered through 
I the mail to everv member of the Tuesday Afternoon 
Club of Glendale, could there be other than a feeling 
of that "get together and pull" spirit so necessary to 
the best results for organized success? Opening its 
season with a luncheon at which thirty-five new mem- 
■bers were special guests of the club was of itself a 
; brilliant start. These guests were seated at tables 
; which were presided over by past presidents, thus 
bringing together the first and last members of the 
club. During the entire summer the clubhouse has 
been open so that affairs might be held in order that 
those who desired social contact could meet, and also 
in this way its material aid has helped the club 
financially, as commercialism must creep in regard- 
less to the aversion at the thought, for a big club is 
a vast business venture and the piper must be paid. 

Meetings have been held every month during the 
vacation period at which time the president, board of 
directors, and chairman, of standing committees have 
planned for the season's work. One of the important 
events will be a "Jubilee Fiesta," to be held Novem- 



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ber 20 and 21. At this time, besides booths of every 
description, a "Fashion Show," "Tea" and a "Pageant 
of Shawls" will be featured. This pageant has never 
been shown in California and will be put on by Mr. 
William Barry, an artist, who has been secured for 
this purpose. 

This year another link has been added to the chain 
of activities in the creation of a junior auxiliary, to 
be composed of daughters and friends of members. 
Those joining must have the endorsement of an adult 
member as well as that of one of the auxiliary, the 
age limit is from sixteen to twenty-one years. With 
judicious training this group should develop into a 
dependable addition of strength, and having its own 
president and officrs makes it to a great degree self- 
governing. The eleven departments, which are the 
outstanding feature of the club, headed by women of 
ability as curators are doing splendid work and have 
expert instructors wherever necessary. The Fine 
Arts department exhibits each month a group of 
beautiful paintings, the work of prominent artists of 
the country. 

These are hung in the banquet room :md are the 
admiration of all observers. Ebpi-ci;:l care has beet, 
used in the selection of programs for meetings and 
worth while speakers yn vovid wide subjects are thr 
rule of luncheon programs. Much constructive enjoy- 
ment is derived in this w;iy. The ye.ir book, contain- 
ing one hundred pages, is a wt-Ic of art. Ji'hn Cotton, 
the well-known artist, having designed the cover, 
where on a sepia background done in gold 's an etch- 
ing of the main entrance with a suggestion of the 
facade of the building. Altogether a Heipiul, Hope- 
ful, Happy year is the outlook. Help fill because of 
its organized activities, social, cultural and communal. 
Hopeful because of its membership of splendid work- 
ers whose goal spells success. 

Happy because it has met every obligation and more 
during the life of the clubhouse, and lastly !)ecause it 
has secured for itself a valued place in the commun- 
ity, thus bespeaking its own motto, "In Unitv There 
Is Strength." 



WOMAN'S CLUB OF LANKER- 
SHIM 

The Woman's Club of Lankershim held their open- 
ing meeting and luncheon at Community Church Fri- 
day, October 2, with a large attendance and much 
enthusiasm for a prosperous year. Each member 
was given a new year book, containing programs and 
by-laws, directory, club song and club prayer. 

A fine musical program was given after the busi- 
ness meeting. 




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Prompt attention to 

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Please mention. Clubwoman. 



NOVEMBER, 1925 



Page 21 



RAMONA WOMAN'S CLUB OF 
MONTEREY PARK 

By Mrs. D. H. Sotleder 

The club began its year October 9 with a luncheon 
in a flower-decked banquet room. 

- The flag salute was led by Mrs. L .U. Stone, the 
donor of the lovely flag now the Club property 

After the club song, "America the Beautiful," Mrs. 
F. H. Vecor^ president of the club made her opening 
address, outlming some of the things she hopes for 
during the coming year and asking for the coopera- 
tion of all members. 

She dwelt upon the keynote of kindly thought and 
love as being the motive power behind all club work. 

A splendid program followed and all chairmen of 
departments were introduced. 

The board of directors have been unusually active 
during the summer making plans for a very busy year. 
The Ramona Woman's Club is especially interested 
in the "Better Films" movement and "Child Welfare" 
work, as well as having the usual departments of 
literature, music, conservation, birds and wild flowers, 
drama, international relations and the Junior 
Auxiliary. 

Our club was organized in 1915 for the study of 
literature, art, music, science and anything pertaining 
thereto. There are two meetings each month and 
very interesting programs are had. - The member- 
ship is 164. 



NEPTUNIAN CLUB 

By Maude C. fVithers, Press Chairman 

The Neptunian Club was most fortunate in secur- 
ing Mrs. A. X. Wilmot of Santa Monica, to talk to 
us on Early California History on our last social 
day. She told most interestingly of her recent trip to 
the various missions of the state. 

On October 15, ten machine loads of club members 
and friends had an enjoyable, instructive and profit- 
able trip through the factories of Bishop, L. A. 
Creamery and Holsum Baking Co. 

Our program committee outlined the program for 
the balance of the year at the last business meeting 
and we should all have a general knowledge of 
things Californian if we manage to retain some of 
the facts we are to hear in the coming months. 

Plans for the Bazaar to be held December 4 and 5 
are going on 



THE IVY CLUB 

.By Mrs: Joe Christy Coriuin, Press Chairman 
The first business meeting of the year for the Ivy 
Club was held in the Clark Hotel Parlors, Tuesday, 
October 6, at 11 a. m. 

The officers for this year are: President, Lillian 
Hatter Dodge ; first vice president, Mrs. Walter M. 
Cole; second vice president, Mrs. Venus Morgan; 
recording secretary, Mrs. Mable Hopkins; correspond- 
ing secretary, Mrs. L. T. Badeau; treasurer, Mrs. 
C, E. Grifiln. 

Committees Press Chairman, Mrs. Joe Christy 
Corwin; .Marion Tracy Whiting, Mrs. M. Boyne. 

Welfare committee: Chairman, Mrs. Whitehead; 
Mrs. Bridal, Mrs. Webster. 

Sick committee: Chairman, Mrs. Earl Graham; 
Mrs. Willard Sharp, Mrs. H. Symonds. 

Sawtelle Soldiers' Home committee: Chairman, 
Mrs. Greene; Mrs. Colbeck, Mrs. Paul Wagner. 

Drama committee: Chairman, Mrs. MacArthur; 
Mrs. Littlejohn, Mrs. Kunze. 

Music committee: Chairman, Mrs. J. Wangerin; 
Mrs. W. E. Mabee, Mrs. Holter. 

Federation chairman: Mrs. Mable Hopkins. 



Outgo and Income 

T T IS impossible for any in- 
dustry long to pay higher 
wages and higher prices 
without also having at least 
some increase in its own rate 
of income. In serving gas to 
our patrons we are confronted 
with the condition of — 

higher wages 

higher tax rate 

higher prices for materials 

higher investment per consumer 

and higher interest rates 

than prevailed in 1914, before 
the War demoralized our 
standards of exchange. 
But a given gas heating serv- 
ice in Los Angeles today actu- 
ally costs the customer less 
than in 1914. 

No one can continue indefi- 
nitely with a larger outgo and 
a smaller income; so, as we 
cannot control the outgo, we 
have been obliged to ask the 
State Railroad Commission 
for a revision of the gas rate 
to correct the shortage that ex- 
ists in the income. 
We feel that our course of 
action will meet with the ap- 
proval of our consumers gen- 
erally. 



LosAngelesGas and 
Electric Corporation 



?age 22 



The CLUBWOMAN 



Directory of California Products 

For the convenience of the seventy thousand clubwomen of California and 
the many others who have enthusiastically subscribed to the campaign of the 
women's clubs to promote in every possible way the use by Californians of Cali- 
fornia products, The Clubwoman, mouthpiece of the campaign, presents the fol- 
low^ing partial classified list of California products. In planning their shopping, 
clubwomen will find this list handy reference guide to what to order in carry- 
ing out their pledge to buy California-made goods wherever possible. 



AWNINGS 

Acme Tent and Awning Co. — Canopies. 
4069 Mission Road, Los Angeles. Tele- 
phone CApitol 7380. 

BUILDING MATERIALS 

Doors-Sash-Screens — ^Veneered Doors, High 
Grade Interior Finish — Pacific Door & 
Sash Co. 

Hardwood Floor Finishers and Contractors 
— National Floor Co., Los Angeles. 

Mirrors, Sand, Plaster, Vitrolite — Raphael 
Glass Co., Los Angeles. 

Pioneer Paper Co., Manufacturers of Roof- 
ings. 

Sash-Doors-Hardwoods-Hardware — Frank 
Graves Sash, Door and Mill Co. 

CLOTHING 

"Bentsknit," "Ribstitched," Bathing Suits 
and Sweaters — Pacific Knitting Mills, Los 
Angeles. 

"Summers Quality" outing and work cloth- 
ing for men and boys — Summers Mfg. 
Co., Inc. 

CARPET CLEANING 

City Steam Carpet Cleaning Works, John 
Bloeser, Main 0430. New Rugs. 

FOODS 
Biscuits, crackers, etc. — Pacific Coast Bis- 
cuit Co., Los Angeles. 

Capitol Products, flour, etc. — Capitol Mill- 
ing Co., Los Angeles. 

Carson-Baruch Baking Co., Inc., Wholesale 
Bakers, 3545 Pasadena Ave., Los Ange- 
les. Capitol 5 770. 

Christopher Co., L. J. — Quality Ice Cream 
and Candies. 



Faultless Bread — "Let your daily bread be 
Faultless." Faultless Bread Bakery, Los 
Angeles. 

Globe "Al" Flour, Macaroni Products and 
Cereals — Globe Grain and Milling Co., 
Los Angeles. 

Iris Brand "Over 200 Wonderful Things to 
Eat" — Distributed by Haas, Baruch & 
Co., Los Angeles. 

Morola — Nut Margarine, Morris & Co., Los 
Angeles. 

Newmark's Pure High Grade Coffee— 
FAMOUS FOR FLAVOR. 

Olson's Bread, "O So Good" — Olson Bak- 
ing Co., Los Angeles. 

Puritas Vacuum-packed Coffee — a Los An- 
geles product, at most grocers. 

Miss Saylor's, Inc., Unusual Chocolates,' 
6752 Venice Blvd., Culver City. 



FURNITURE AND HOUSE FITTINGS 

Barker Bros., 716-738 South Broadway — 
Complete Furnishers of Successful Homes 
— Our "Own Make" and "Mastermade" 
Upholstered Furniture and Hand-tailored, 
"individualized" Mattresses and Box 
Springs. 

Inglewood Furniture — Inglewood Manufac- 
turing Co., Inglewood, Cal. 

Kling Furniture — Kling Manufacturing Co., 
Los Angeles. 

Kwality Pillows, etc. — Kwality Feather Co., 
Los Angeles. 

Los Angeles Can Co. — Manufacturers of 
Tin Cans for all purposes. 

Sanotuf Mattress, furniture — Roberti Bros., 
Los Angeles. 

Stockwell Neverstretch Mattress — L. W. 
Stockwell Co., Los Angeles. 



NOVEMBER, 1925 



Page 23 



Directory of California Products 



Upholstered Furniture — Soronow's Furni- 
ture Manufacturing Co., Los Angeles. 

Window Shades — Window Shade Products 
Company, 910 East Fourth St., Los An- 
geles. 

"Zenith" Upholstered Furniture and Mat- 
tresses — Bailey-Schmitz Co., Los An- 
geles. • 

Citizens Independent Ice & Cold Storage 
Co., 61 0-620 South Raymond Ave., Pasa- 
dena, California. Phone Colorado 30. 

GARDEN EQUIPMENT 

"Rainmaker" Hadden Automatic Sprinkler 
Co., Los Angeles. 



GASOLINE AND MOTOR OIL 
Ventura Gasoline "California's Best," Ven- 
tura Motor Oil (Paraffin-Base) — Ventura 
Refining Co., Los Angeles. 

HEATING SYSTEMS 
Gleewood Furnaces — Foss & Jones, Pasa- 
dena. 

MOTOR TRUCKS 
Moreland Motor Truck Co., Los Angeles. 

STSORAGE BATTERIES 
Hobbs Storage Batteries, Hobbs Storage 
Battery Corp., Los Angeles. 

WATER HEATERS 
De Luxe and Supreme Gas Water Heaters 
— General Water Heater Corp., 1601 
Compton Ave. 



PALMDALE WOMAN'S CLUB E. C. O. CLUB OF VENTURA 



By Mrs. Roy Munson, Press Chairman 

Members of the Palradale Woman's club report a 
pleasant and profitable year ending last May under 
the leadership of our president, Mrs. E. P. Moulton. 

Our club is a thriving organization and we are 
striving little by little to raise funds for our long 
hoped for club house. Our program for the coming 
year includes many activities and entertainments of 
interest. 

The newly-elected officers who were installed at our 
last meeting in May are as follows: 

President, Mrs. E. P. Moulton ; first vice president, 
Mrs. W. M. Hollingsworth ; second vice president, 
Mrs. C. W. Fischer; recording secretary, Mrs. Roy 
Ristrom; treasurer, Mrs. Wm. Moore; corresponding 
secretary, Mrs. A. W. Erode; press correspondent, 
Mrs. Roy Muman; auditor, Mrs. E. C. Savage. 

The chairmen of the various committees are busy 
outlining their work for the coming year. All mem- 
bers anticipate a very prosperous year for the club. 
We meet on the second and fourth Thursdays of each 
month. 



WOMAN'S CLUB OF BIG BEAR 
LAKE 

By Mrs. F. M. LaGrange, President 

The Woman's Club of Big Bear Lake was organ- 
ized in 1922 by Mrs. Charles Turner, second vice 
president of the Friday morning club; Mrs. Leon Aus- 
tin, whose husband is pastor of the Congregational 
church at Burbank; and Mrs. Bess Munn Davis, 
editor of Big Bear Life. 

The object of the club is civic and social, and as 

Big Bear is a summer resort, the club provided an 

"Entertainer" to conduct parties on hikes and horse- 

I back rides and lead the Community Singing during 

the summer. 

A meeting place was provided by Mrs. Skinner, in 

the beautiful social hall of Pine Knot Lodge. Our 

special work now is to increase our building fund so 

that we may have a permanent home. To accomp- 

i lish this we have held a home cooked food sale, 

! and a barbecue at which five hundred people were 

' fed — a four-hundred pound beef having been donated 

by Mr. and Mrs. Will Shay. 



By Mrs. H. U. Burtnett, Press Chairman 

This club has its own club house and is equipped 
for all kinds of entertainments. In August a com- 
mittee of club members gave a paid luncheon to sev- 
eral different groups of card players brought by the 
several hostesses, some bringing as many as twelve 
guests, in all fifty-eight were served. We also give 
luncheons and dinners to different organizations. Last 
Friday evening a dinner was served to the Chamber 
of Commerce. 

On October 19 there was a reciprocity meeting of 
the County Unit composed of twenty-four clubs, the 
President and three members were invited from each 
club. A program was given. New <;arpets have 
just been laid which adds much beauty and comfort 
to our rooms. 

Our meetings are held every two weeks at which 
time some kind of entertainment is given and refresh- 
ments are served by a committee of three members. 
We have a ladies' quartette which also contributes 
to the entertainment of the club. 

At present we are busy preparing for our annual 
holiday sale which will take place sometime in 
December. 



SAN FERNANDO EBELL CLUB 

By Mrs. J. IV. Muckley, Press Chairman 

Looking forward to a year's work which promises 
much pleasure and profit, the San Fernando Ebell 
Club held its first meeting October 2nd. 

The new president, Mrs. Alexander Martin in her 
address suggested that the club members keep before 
their mind's eye the letters "C. H." which stands for 
"California History" and for "Club House," the two 
definite aims of the club this year. 

For the season of 1925 and 26 the club is reviewing 
at each meeting two chapters of Cleland's History of 
California of the American Period. 

At the meeting held at Brand Park on October 16, 
we had the pleasure of hearing Mrs. Rose Hendee 
discuss the Inheritance Tax Law of California. 

The club was also addressed by Mr. Holden on the 
necessity of supporting the coming Community Chest 
Drive and a most delightful social time was enjoyed 
in Memory Garden wth our guests, the Civic League 
Club of San Fernando. 



Page 24 



The CLUBWOMAN 



POMONA EBELL CLUB 

By Mrs. Lester J. Fitch 

Three new departments and an unusually fascinat- 
ing new section have given impetus to our work so 
far in the new club year. At every meeting our Art 
chairman is educating us by easy stages, "Little steps 
for little feet," and soon we shall be celebrating Edu- 
c:ition Week, learning of art, books and good citizen- 
ship. The first appeal to our musical natures will be 
made on November 6, when Elena Gerheardt will pre- 
sent the opening concert of our Philharmonic Course. 

Our new department, "The American Home," has 
a splendid start under the guidance of Dr. Robert 
Taylor, of Pomona College, who will develop this 
project through a series of lectures and discussions on 
such subjects as these: The Development of the Fam- 
ily, The Changing Home, Modern Tendencies in the 
American Home, The Pre-School Age, The Grammar 
School Age, The High School Age, The College Age, 
The Home and Community Influences, The Home and 
the Church, The Home and> Good Citizenship. With 
such subjects and the close interest therein that lies in 
the heart of every woman. Dr. Taylor will no doubt 
be able to enthuse us greatly. He is eminently quali- 
fied for the work. The clubs of Puente, Glendora, 
Covina and Ontario have been invited to send repre- 
sentatives to the meetings of this department. 

The Motion Picture Department, also new this year, 
is doing splendid work for the community. The chair- 
man, Mrs. Raymond E. Smith, who is also chairman 
of a similar committee in the P. T. A., with the co- 
operation of the West Coast Theaters sponsoring the 
Ji.nior Motion Pictures, has already given one Sat- 
uiday matinee. Our committee acted as hostesses. 

Still another new departure is the Girl's Work, 
which is an outgrowth of the efforts of last year to 
help the Campfire Girls. It will be our aim to keep 
in touch with the various groups and the Girls' 
League. The clubhouse is open to the girls for their 
monthly meetings. 

Each month the walls of the auditorium are hung 
with pictures. In October, block prints were shown 



and during November, the Kantz galleries of Pasa- 
dena will show the work of various California 
artists. Mr. Kantz will talk of these pictures at our 
luncheon, November 6. After luncheon we shall have 
- a presentation of the play "Uncle Sam's Workshop," 
which received both the district and the State citizen- 
ship prizes last ye&r. 

During Book Week we shall have an exhibit in the 
club parlors and book chats will be given to acquaint 
our membership with recent writings in drama, fiction 
and childrens' books. With all these good things in 
prospect and retrospect Pomona Ebell should, have 
a very lively interest in its fall work. 



PROFESSIONAL WOMAN'S 
CLUB 

By Florence M. Bischoff, Secretary 

The club year of the Professional Woman's Club 
has begun with great enthusiasm. The president this 
year is Mrs. Mila Tupper Maynard, a minister. 

It has been the custom of the club to select its 
piesident from the ranks of the lawyers one year, from 
the ranks of the dentists the following year, and from 
the ranks of the physicians the next. This year, how- 
ever, the club departed from tradition and honored 
itself in honoring the only minister in its membership 
by unanimously electing Mrs. Maynard president. 

The club is holding its monthly dinner meetings 
this year at the beautifully appointed Women's Athle- 
tic Club of Los Angeles. 

The October meeting was addressed by charming 
Lady Anniar Adams. Her topic was "Women's Inter- 
ests in our Dominion." She has but recently returned 
with her husband. Sir John Adams, from an exten- 
sive trip through Australia, Tasmania and New 
Zealand. Her comments upon the economic and social 
conditions of women in that quarter of the globe 
ivere most interesting to American women, who can- 
not realize that the labor saving devices, considered 
necessities here, are practically unknown there — and 
certainly but rarely used. 



TRUSTWORTHY FIRMS 



It is with pleasure that THE CLUBWOMAN recommends to the patronage of the Fed- 
eration membership the Nurseries and Florists whose announcements appear on this page. 



NE'W BULB CATALOGUE 

for 1924-25 now ready for distribution. It 
is free and a post card or telephone call 
will bring it immediately. 

Morris & Snow Seed Co., Inc. 

Established 1905 

853 So. San Pedro Street 

Telephone Main 3530 

LOS ANGELES CALIFORNIA 


Howard & Smith 

NURSERYMEN AND LANDSCAPE 
ARCHITECTS 

Phone 877-541 Ninth and Olive Sts. 

DesigTl and Decorating TRinity 
a Specialty 7541 


TUcker 2693— Phones— TUcker 5467 

WRIGHT'S 


SEEDS 

Headquarters for Farm and Garden 
Ornamental Plants, Shrubs and Trees 

WINSEL-CIBBS SEED CO. 
The Old Reliable Seed House 

of Los Angeles 

Main Store, 2 1 1 S. Main St. 

Phone VAndike 9532 

Nursery Yard Forty-ninth and Main 


Flower Shop Fourth St. 
224 West Fourth St. Los Angeles, Cal. 



NOVEMBER. 1925 



Page 25 



LONG BEACH EBELL 

By Mrs. Burr Broivn, Press Chairman 

November sixteenth brings a birthday to the Ebell 
of Long Beach and, although the club is purely femi- 
nine, it proudly acknowledges the age of twenty-nine. 
It is the first time in several years that the birthday 
falls on Monday, the club day, so the Charter Day 
Luncheon will truly celebrate the birthday. Arrange- 
ments have been made with the Ladies' Aid Society 
of the Grace Methodist Church to serve a turkey 
hincheon to four hundred in the dining room of the 
club house, thus relieving all club members of respon- 
sibility so they may thoroughly enjoy their party. 
One of the features of the luncheon will be individual 
cakes with a single lighted candle. Appropriate 
toasts will be given during the luncheon and a happy 
time is anticipated. 

Later when the members adjourn to the auditorium, 
Mrs. L. P. Frary, one of the most beloved of the older 
members, will give the club history, Ada Potter Wise- 
man will entertain with a group of songs and the 
Anderson String Quartet will play. 

Since its organization, Ebell has grown from the 
charter group of seventeen to its present membership 
of eleven hundred, outgrowing one club house and 
now being comfortably housed in its beautiful new 
$150,000 Spanish home which was completed last 
year. 

Naturally the club has quite a building indebtedness 
but with the division of the membership into groups 
for raising money, many novel benefit affairs have 
been planned. One of the most successful and popu- 
lar events of October was a luncheon and fashion 
show planned by Group D under the leadership of 
Mrs. Omar Parker. A delicious luncheon was served 
to 325 at tables made lovely with the yellow and 
brown shades of autumn. Freddie Carter's orches- 
tra furnished the music and models paraded the latest 
fashions in negligees, sports wear, afternoon frocks 
and evening gowns with appropriate accessories for 
every type, from the sub-deb to the stout matron. The 
fashion show was under the supervision of Buffums', 
the leading department store of the city, and exhibited 
apparel taken from their stock. Bridge was enjoyed 
in the lounge and patio following the luncheon. The 
event was a social and financial success. More than 
$300 was cleared for the building fund. 

Another splendid idea which netted the fund about 
$700 was an advertising project engineered by Group 
Z under the leadership of Mrs. H. F. Burmester. A 
large, blue card handsomely printed in gold shows 
the club programs for the year, alternated with ad- 
vertising cards of selected and approved merchants 
of Long Beach. These have been distributed to the 
homes of the 1100 members as a convenient reference 
to both advertisers and programs. 

Two very choice programs come in November. On 
November 2,' a lecture recital will be given by Edna 
Woolley Lieurance, soprano; Thurlow L/ieurance, 
composer pianist and Lillian Reed, flutist; and on 
November 2, a lecture recital will be given by Edna 
"The Newest Search for the Oldest Man," by the 
noted explorer, Roy Chapman Andrews. 

GOLETA WOMAN'S CLUB 

By Mrs. J. C. Tast 

The Goleta Woman's Club holds its regular meet- 
ings every second and fourth Thursdays of the 
month. The program for September 24 was of un- 
usual interest. Mrs. Lucy Sexton, Mrs. Pickett, Mrs. 
Culver and Mrs. J. S. Niles all gave unusually inter- 
esting accounts of their summer spent in traveling 
over the state in vacation time. 

On October 8, Mrs. Eugene Kellogg told us of 
Columbus Day and its significance. 



BURBANK WOMAN'S CLUB 

By Mrs. Evaleen Locke, Press Chairman 

With a sigh of relief and satisfaction the weary 
club workers threw open the doors of the clubhouse 
on Thursday, October 15. Thus began the first Fall 
Festival ever held in the new club home. 

The sides of the auditorium were lined with 
booths. Rare and unusual fruits and vegetables com- 
prised one; magnificent specimens of flowers, artisi- 
cally arranged, formed another. From the factories 
and industries of Burbank came a fine display of their 
respective products, rivaling those of the needlework 
section. Novel and skillfully made were the favors 
that filled the booth next to the literature and Bible 
section. The latter displayed books, stationery and 
Christmas cards; while the art section showed the 
quality of their work in their exhibits of "tied-and- 
dyeds," dishes, naintings, and similar objects. 

The Girl's Auxiliary sold candy as fast as they 
could make it, and the "wonder" packages, neatly 
wrapped in red, white and blues, were dispensed 
with rapididity. 

For the sum of a dime you could have your fortune 
told, or you could visit the "Works of High Art." 
If you craved food rather than entertainment, you 
m.ight have visited the tea committee's booth of cafe- 
teria meals and light refreshments. 

Every afternoon and evening there was a program 
given under the auspices of different departments in 
the club, assisted by outside local talent. 

Mrs. R. H. Cummings, our president, and the finance 
committee, express themselves as well pleased with the 
financial returns of the Festival. 

While all the members have been working hard 
towards the success of the Fall Festival, it has not 
in any way interfered with the regular work of the 
club and its various departments. 



we 



destroy 
moths 



in clothing — in uphostering — 
pianos — rugs, by our excusive 
scientific fumigation process in 
the Plymetl "Air-Tite" vaults. 
Phone WEstmore 4141. 

133S So. Figueroa St. 
5th and Alameda Sts. 
Los Angeles 




Los Angeles 



San Francisco 



Oakland 



Fresno 



1 



Page 26 



The CLUBWOMAN 




Outdoor Sports are Increasingly Popular with Students of California's Private 

Schools. The Bridal Paths in the Foothills Afford Much Pleasure for Enthusiastic 

Riders of Westlake School for Girls 



EDUCATIONAL NOTES 
* By Jean Kentle 

An informal Hallowe'en dinner party was given 
at Kenwood Hall Friday evening, October 30. The 
house was artistically decorated and Hallowe'en games 
and stunts were a feature of the evening. Wednesday 
evening is always "Hostess Night" at Kenwood Hall, 
one of the resident students alternating with a member 
of the faculty as hostess, planning the menu, table 
decorations and being "hostess of the Day". Miss 
Lillian Wagner was hostess October 21 and Miss 
Delphine Moore, of the primary department, was 

hostess October 28. 

* * * 

An unusually enjoyable Spanish Party was given 
at Urban Military Academy Friday evening, October 
30, with Cadet Peter Hough as host of the occasion. 
Spanish decorations, a Spanish orchestra in costume 
for the dancing and specialty dances contributed to 
the evening's entertainment. Cadets of the academy 
paraded for the Flower Show held recently at the 
Woman's Club of Hollywood. 



Miss Frederica DeLaguna and Miss Jessica Smith 
Vance, principals of Westlake School for Girls, will 
leave this week to attend the annual meeting of the 
Headmistresses' Association of the Pacific Coast, at 
the Fairmont Hotel, San Francisco. Miss Vance is this 
year's president of the western association. The chief 
address will be given by Miss Mary Whiton Calkins, 
professor of Philosophy and Psychology at Wellesley 
College, on "The Psychological Value of Mental Tests 
for College Entrance". Miss Marshall, of the Uni- 
versity of California, department of physical education, 
and Miss Helen Masters Bunting, of Stanford, de- 
partment of physical education, will discuss "Inter- 
scholastic Playday Programs". 



TO OUR PRESS CHAIRMEN 



Articles not appearing in November issue 
of the Clubwoman, are being held for our next 
issue because of lack of space. 



CAROLINE DUNCAN 

Studio Open October 1 
Classes in Public Speaking and all forms of 

Dramatic Art. 
1622 Crenshaw Boulevard EMpire 6360 

SECRETARIAL 
COACHING 

For cultured people desiring personal attention. 
Refined, harmonious surroundings. All Secretarial 
subjects. Enter at any time. Management, Mrs. 
Frank Rutherford. 7 I 1 S. Vermont Ave. Fl 1763. 



WESTLAKE SCHOOL 

FOR GIRLS 

Resident and Day School 
333 S. Westmoreland Ave. Loa Angeles 



KENWOOD HALL 

Resident and day school for girls. Sub-primary 
through High School. Spanish, French, Expres- 
sion. Dancing included in regular tuition. 675 
S. Vermont Ave., Los Angeles. WAshington 1612. 



NOVEMBER, 1925 



Page 27 



SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 

As a result of personal inquiry The Clubwoman takes pleasure in commending to the patron- 
age of members of The California Federation of Women's Clubs the schools whose announce- 
ments appear in The Clubwoman. 



(girls' Collegiate ^cfjool 

Removal to the Country 

Thirty- fourth year. Glendora Foothills, over- 
looking San Gabriel Valley. Fifty acre estate, 
— orange groves, woodlands, canyons. New 
buildings Italian type. All sports; saddle 
horses. 

OUTDOOR LIFE A REALITY 
Accredited. Seventh grade to College entrance; 
also. General, Special and Post-Graduate 
courses. 

1 008 West Adams Street, Los Angeles. Miss 
Parsons and Miss Dennen, Principals. 

Cumnock ^tfjool 

Thirty- First Year 
School of Expression, Academy, Junior School 

Complete courses in 
Vocal Interpretation of Art 

Literature Public Speaking 

Literary Appreciation Journalism 

Story-Telling Story Writing 

Voice and Diction Dramatic Art 

Aesthetic Dancing 

HELEN A. BROOKS, Director 
5353 West Third Street 
GRanite 3253 
GR anite 3353 Los Angeles 



University of Southern California 

Bulletins with full description of 

courses on application 

Address Registrar 

University of Southern California 
35th and University Ave. Los Angeles 



ELLIOTT SCHOOL 

FOR GIRLS 

Residence and Day School. Sub-Primary 
through Eleventh Grade. Ideal Home 
Life. Character Building. Superior Edu- 
cational Advantages. Out-Door Classes. 

MARTHA COLLINS WEAVER, Principal, 
Gramercy Place at Pico Blvd., Los Angeles 



"The Coming West Point of the West" 

San Diego Army & Navy 
Academy 

The Academy enjoys the highest Scholastic rat- 
ing of the Univ. of Calif. — "Division A." It is 
under Government supervision. It emphasizes 
Christian Character Training. Address for infor- 
mation Col. Thos. A. Davis, Pres. Pacific Beach, 
Calif. 



iUlarlfiorougl) ^cfjool for #irls( 

S029 W. 3rd St. Los Angelei 

Boarding and Day School 

Accredited to Eastern and Western 

Colleges 

36th Term— 1925. 
Ada S. Blake, A. B., Principal 

PAGE MILITARY ACADEMY 

A BIG SCHOOL FOB LITTLE BOYS 

The largest of Its class In America. Everything adapted 
to meet the needs of the smaller boy. Five fireproof 
buildings; seven-acre campus; seventeen resident teachers. 
Here a boy la taught self-reliance. Through military 
training he acquires habits of exactness, the spirit ot 
team work and co-operation and also energy and Initia- 
tive — the best preparation for life, no matter what pro- 
fession he may follow. Let our Catalogue tell you all 
about our school. 

EGBERT A. GIBBS, Headmaster 

1257 Cochran Avenue 

EMptre 9103. LOS ANGELES. CAL. 



URBAN 

Military Academy 

The Great Outdoor School 



for the building of Body and Brain and Character 
with Sports and Pastimes. Under Matchless Con- 
ditions. Address the Secretary, Miss Keller, 637 
Wilcox Ave,, Los Angeles. 



Pacific Military Academy 

Washington Blvd., Culver City 

Boarding and Day School. Beautiful new Italian 
Renaissance type buildings. Excellent Faculty. 
Out-door Classes. All athletics, swimming, gym- 
nasium, horseback riding and music. Enter any 
time in Grammar or High School. Enroll now for 
Fall Term. References required. For catalogue 
write Secretary or Phone Culver City 3294. 



The Greenwood School 

FOR GIRLS 

Select Resident and Day School. Limited Num- 
ber. In Session All Year. Principals: Mrs. M. 
Greenwood (Newnham College, Cambridge), Mr. 
H. F. Greenwood, B.A. (Corpus Christi College, 
Cambridge) . 5928 Franklin Avenue, Hollywood. 



Page 28 



The CLUBWOMAN 



GOLDEN STATE DIVISION NO. 

104 OF THE G. I. A. TO THE 

B. OF L. E. 

Mrs. Clarence Busk, Press Chairman 
Golden hours of each golden day, 

urs to fill ere they speed away, 

L eaving behind them whatever we sow — 
Deeds that are noble oi^ thoughts that are low; 
E very seed shall bring forth its fruit 
N ever a plant that will not take root. 

S erving and loving our fellow man, 

T rusting him over and over again, 

A Iways rememb'ring hidden from sight, 

T hat spark of divinity glowing and bright, 

E arnestly striving ourselves to command. 

D oing the duty that's nearest our hand, 

1 nfinite wisdom will bring to our view 
V isions of beauty, life's meaning anew. 

I f we cling to our visions of truth they must win. 
S eeking with ardor the kingdom within 
I nfinite Love will our blessings increase, 
O ver the earth all bloodshed will cease. 
N othing can hinder the dawning of peace. 

GARDENA WEDNESDAY PRO- 
GRESSIVE CLUB 

The coming year of the Wednesday Progressive 
Club of Gardena, under the able leadership of Mrs. 
Bertha Larsh, President, promises to be a most suc- 
cessful one. Many new departments in conformation 
with the departments of the State Federation of Clubs 
have been added. Chairmen of these departments are 
being urged to attend the monthly conferences. 

The Study Section, a new department, composed of 
the enthusiastic readers of the club is deep in Nor- 
wegian life and literature. This section meets on the 
regular club day in the forenoon for a two hours' 
discussion. 

Last year the club bought a large lot near their 
present location and money for a new clubhouse is 
being earned by the members serving a dinner to the 
Lions' Club each week. 

A stunt entertainment was given recently under the 
direction of Mrs. Rachel Martin, film chairman. 
Each chairman of the club was asked to put on a 
stunt and the final act was a comparison of the old 
and the new fashioned girl, many beautiful costumes 
of each period being displayed. 



THE WOMEN'S CIVIC LEAGUE 
OF NEWPORT BEACH 

By Flora Beatty, Press Chairman 
The 'Woman's Civic League of Newport Beach held 
its first meeting beginning the year 1925-26 at the 
home of Mrs, Emily Jarvis, chairman of Program, 
October 13. 

It was a happy reunion of League members, some 
of whom had been absent for several years. New 
members were also welcomed into the fold. It was 
a real home coming for old and new members alike. 
The Rev. George T. Ralston, pastor of Newport 
and Balboa M'. E. Churches addressed the meeting. 



His subject was "Citizenship" and was very well 
handled and since good citizenship is a theme that 
is ever uppermost in the minds and hearts of all club 
members, was of especial interest to his listeners. 

Music was furnished by Mrs. Nancy Marlow, who 
is so well known for her sweet voice and charming 
manner. 

Miss Lillian Lockwood Coffin, a writer of note 
who contributes to the Saturday Evening Post, Harp- 
ers, McClure's and other magazines, read a paper, the 
subject of which was the "Pool" at West Newport. 

Tea was served during the social hour which fol- 
lowed, and a pleasant hour was enjoyed by the large 
number who attended. 

The next meeting, "President's Day" was held 
October 27, at the home" of Mrs. A. J. Garfield. The 
piogram was in charge of Mrs. Lillian Richards. 

The officers for the coming year are: Mrs. Lillian 
Richards, President; Mrs. Eugene Reber, 1st Vice- 
President; Mrs. R. H. Summus, 2nd Vice-President 
and Corresponding Secretary; Mrs. Flora Beatty, 
Recording Secretary and Press and Publicity Chair- 
man; Mrs. A. J. Garfield, Treasurer. Directors, Mrs. 
Emily Jarvis and Mrs. G. G. Garriagius. 



THE RECIPROCITY CLUB 

By Netta O. Jennings, Press Chairman 
The Reciprocity Club started activities for the sea- 
son with its regular monthly meeting, October 14, at 
12 o'clock, in the Windsor Tea Room, Brack Shops. 
Our aims this year are Philanthropy, Child Wel- 
fare, American Citizenship, and in order to fully co- 
operate with the District Federation a chairman has 
been appointed by the president for every depart- 
ment to attend the conferences. 

We are proud of our president, Mrs. R. W. Meeker, 
who did such efficient work as chairman of the 
Memorial Redwood Grove fund sending in $18,000 so 
generously given by the various women's clubs of 
Southern California. 



PEERLESS LAUNDRY 

Try Our Famous Rough Dry 



OR 



Complete Finish Department 

For Women's and Children's 
Clothing 



PEERLESS FINISHED 
Shirts and Collars 



LOWEST PRICES CONSISTENT 
With Good Work and Service 

Peerless Laundry 

AXridge 9161 



HUNT£R,DUL(N &CO. 

San Francisco Santa Barbara Los Angeles Oakland San Diego 

GOVERNMENT. MUNICIPAL. DISTRICT AND CORPORATION BONDS 



NOVEMBER, 1925 



Page 29 



SAUGUS COMMUNITY CLUB 

By Mrs. Nina B. JVrlg/il, Press Chairman 

California Day was appropriately celebrated when 
the Saugus Community Club held its second meeting 
of the year at the Saugus school house, October 17. 
Mrs. A. X. Wilmot, of Santa Monica gave an interest- 
ing talk on Early California, and its history. Local 
talent was secured for the rest of the day's program, 
of which Mrs. T. Suraco is chairman. 

Mrs. A. Peters rendered a vocal solo, "Happy Young 
Hearts," while Mrs. Lasher accompanied her on the 
piano, and who later played two piano solos. 

"California," a reading by C. B. Suraco. 

Although the club is still an infant, yet it realizes 
that "nothing attempted is nothing done" is not con- 
ducive to a rapid growth. 

So the club incorporated, and at the last meeting it 
\vas voted to purchase an acre of ground on which 
to build a clubhouse. 

A committee was appointed, of which the President, 
Mrs. Mary Penhorwood was leader, to locate a club 
site at once. 

Quilts have been made, sold and raffled by the mem- 
bers; dances, silver teas, and many other unique 
affairs have been given in order to raise the required 
money for the securing of an acre of ground. 

The Social and Philanthropic sections, of which 
Mesdames E. Rumsey and J. Haskell respectively are 
chairmen, are largely responsible for the success at- 
tained. 

The meeting was followed by a social hour, in 
charge of the Floral Committtee, Chairman Mrs. 
Tony Suraco. 

The refreshments were carried out in club colors, 
that of blue and gold, as well as the floral decorations. 

A surprise birthday cake was presented to the 
club's president. Gifts of love were also in evidence, 
to which Mrs. Penhorwood graciously responded. 




For 
Every Baking 
Purpose 

Globe ^1 Flour 



Your Grocer Has It 



WOMEN'S CLUB OF CLARE- 
MONT 

By Mrs. Estelle Macfarlane, Press Chairman 

Under the very able leadership of Mrs. Paul Jor- 
dan Smith, We feel that we have accomplished a great 
deal in the furnishing of our clubhouse. 

We might call our building a two-story one, as an 
ample basement provides our kitchen and dining room, 
\\'here we can serve about one hundred and thirty-six 
people. We plan, to not only have our own dinners 
and lunches here, but also to serve other organizations. 

The dishes chosen are a quaint pattern In English 
porcelain, and the silver a Community pattern. The 
floor of the basement is red cement. We have had 
the tables made by our local planing mill, straight 
legged, plain, and stained green. The curtains are 
of unbleached muslin, and dyed a primrose yellow. 
The committee is still discussing table coverings, but 
has decided upon eighteen-inch napkins — dyed yellow, 
unhemmed and unironed, thereby combining both art 
and economy. 

The chairs are the same throughout the building — 
plain with raw-hide bottoms, and stained a brown, 
to match the colors in the hangings upstairs and the 
yellow, browns and reds below. 

Should you see our hangings in the Assembly Room, 
I think you would certainly agree with me that they 
are delightful. They are of a Liberty pattern, cool 
gieens, soft browns, with roses and lemons in abun- 
dance, very symbolic of our Citrus district. 

The rostrum is to be furnished with a brown 
mahogany table and chair. A Klear flox rug in the 
foyer — and the balcony furnished for a director's 
room, and last but not least, a Steinway piano com- 
plete our furnishings. 



L. W. Stockwell Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Stockwell Never 
Stretch Mattress 



Makes Any Bed 
A Better Bed 



Lo3 Angeles 



California 



Page 30 



The CLUBJVOMAN 



TUJUNGA WOMAN'S CLUB SAN JACINTO WOMAN'S CLUB 



By Nanine S. Vevane, Press Chairman 
The Tujunga Woman's Club held its first meeting 
for the new year October 8 ; luncheon was served by 
the board members. Mrs. Flora White, vice chairman, 
Los Angeles district C. F. W. C. for General Federa- 
tion Headquarters was speaker. Mrs. Lillian D. B. 
Wheeler gave a talk on "Our club and its object." 
Three departments are now established, Art, Mrs. 
Guy Barry, chairman, section meets each 1st and 3rd 
Wednesday. Mrs. Minnie Dunn, a noted pianist, is 
chairman of Music section. Thursday, October 22nd 
she will present a program of piano, violin and 
vocal music. Citizenship and International Relations 
are in charge of Mrs. Marian Reynolds. This section 
meets 1st and 3rd Mondays. 



By Mrs. J. A. Hill, Press Chairman 
The last few weeks have been busy ones for the 
Woman's Club. The club members decided to have 
an exhibit of canned fruit, vegetables, flowers and 
fancy work on September 26. The exhibits were 
l?rge and many blue ribbons were awarded the ladies 
of this community. 

At our meeting September 28, we elected a number 
of new members and it is expected this year will be 
a successful one. 

Officers for coming year: Mrs. Zada Gardner, Pres- 
ident; Mrs. Edna Sizelove, Vice President; Mrs. T, 
W. Murray, Recording Secretary; Mrs. J. A. Hill, 
Corresponding Secretary; Mrs. C. D. Pool, Treasurer; 
W. P. Blodgett, County Director; Auditors, Mrs. A. 
H. Bucklev and Mrs. Edna Sizelove. 



MISSION ACRES CLUB 

The Mission Acres Woman's Club held its opening 
luncheon at Porter Hotel Cafe, San Fernando, Friday, 
October 9. An interesting program was given. 

The preamble of the constitution of the United 
States formed the toast topic, and was presented in a 
most clever and inspiring way by the following 
named club women: Mrs. Carvel, district chairman of 
industrial relations; Mrs. Oda Faulconer, district 
chairman of legislation; Mrs. Walter Fisher, district 
chairman of conservation of natural resources; Mrs. 
Alex Martin, president Ebell Club, San Fernando; 
Mrs. J. F. Deloplane, Mrs. J. L. Plummer and Mrs. 
Chas. Stahl, president Mission Acres Parent-Teacher 
Association. 

The Mission Acres Woman's Club is justly proud 
of its music section under chairmanship of Mrs. C. F. 
Schilling, who led in several quartette selections with 
Mesdames Henry Stahl, Burton Davis and Walter 
Koeling. The club is looking forward to continued 
si'ccess in club work under the able leadership of 
Mrs. M. D. Andrews, the newly elected president. 



THE COMMUNITY CLUB, 
SANTA MARIA, CALIF. 

By Mrs. George C. Smith 

Since convening for the year's work after the sum- 
mer's vacation, the Community Club sees a very 
bright outlook for the program. 

Mrs. W. S. Litzenberg, the new president, is en- 
thusiastic in the work and has a number of plans 
for really worth-while endeavor, and is heartily sup- 
ported by the officers, chairmen and members. 

Probably the most important item on the Club's 
program is the raising of money to equip one of 
the rooms in the new branch county hospital soon to 
be erected in this city. 

A Hallowe'en Party was given by the Club on Fri- 
day evening, October 30, at the home of Mrs. Will- 
ism Foster, to raise money for the Santa Barbara 
earthquake fund, it promising to be quite an elab- 
orate affair. 

More than a dozen applications for membership 
have been received within the past two weeks 




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NOVEMBER, 1925 



Page 31 



THE GUADALUPE WELFARE 
CLUB 

By Mrs. Abe Tognazzini, Press Chairman 
The Guadalupe Welfare Club to date is considered 
the baby club of Santa Barbara County. Our mem- 
bership is small but in thought and spirit we are a 
very energetic lot of workers. The work falls on the 
shoulders of a few, but even at that much has been 
accomplished. A tennis court has been built for the 
benefit of the community. The library branch which 
has a circulation of almost 4500 books yearly is also 
maintained by the club by paying rent on the build- 
ing and paying the librarian. 

We gave a public card party and donated the pro- 
ceeds to the Santa Barbara Relief Fund. Our mem- 
bers decorated and entered an auto in the recent Lucas 
Celebration parade taking first prize of $13.00 for the 
best decorated machine. 



THE WOMEN'S PROGRESSIVE 

CLUB OF INGLEWOOD 

ACRES 

By Mrs. Marie Kleaver, Press Chairman 

The Women's Progressive club with less than one 
hundred members was organized May 22, 1919, and 
joined the federation October 27, 1924. 

Mrs. Emma Riegal, program chairman is planning 
an entertainment to be given by local talent sometime 
in November. A small admission will be charged. 

For the past two years, members of this organiza- 
tion have been busy striving to pay for their club- 
house. 

A mystery luncheon, bazaar and party-dance, given 
October 16 and 17, staged by Mrs. C. E. Schrorer, 
chairman of the Ways and Means Committee brought 
a profit'^ast the one hundred dollar mark. 



STUDIO ESTABLISHED 

Among the studios recently established in this city 
there is one which has commanded the attention and 
interest of those desiring instruction of a certain type 
in the realm of general culture. 

The work of this studio is being done by Caroline 
' Duncan, recently of the faculty of the Curry School 
of Expression, Boston. 

Miss Duncan has had a wide and varied experience 
in every phase of her art. Her courses in Public 
Speaking for clubwomen include the training of the 
speaking voice, a critical study of English Diction, 
training for poise of body, and the study of vocal 
V interpretation of literature. These courses are in- 
^ creasing rapidly in numbers and interest. 

Miss Duncan has made a recent tour of the coun- 
try, presented by the Boston School of Expression in 
Dramatic Recital. The critics of the press have 
pronounced her a finished reader, of great charm and 
versatility. 



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OWENSMOUTH WOMAN'S 
CLUB 

By Mrs. Josephine M. Arton, Press Chairman 
Owensmouth Woman's club began a new year aus- 
piciously Wednesday, October 7, with a 1 o'clock 
luncheon at the American Legion clubhouse. There 
was an attendance of 100 members and guests. The 
Board of Directors and Chairmen of committees were 
co-hostesses with the President, Mrs. Julius Franz. 

Mrs. Franz, new president, confessed to being new 
in club work, but she presided graciously. Mrs. 
Joseph Braun, District Vice Chairman of American 
Homes, was an honor guest and gave a splendid 
address. Miss Fanny Lott, of Hollywood gave a 
group of songs, accompanied by Miss Florence Book- 
waiter of the High School. An original poem was 
read by Mrs. Jacob Jepsen. She greeted the new 
members delightfully. 

THE PARLIAMENTARY LAW 
CLUB OF GLENDALE 

By Lea Franklin, Press Chairman 
The members of the Parliamentary Law club of 
Glendale feel they are entering a successful year. 
Their instructor is Mrs. Fannie S. McNutt, considered 
by authorities one of the finest teachers of Parliamen- 
tary Law in the State. 

The time is so valuable with Mrs. McNutt teaching 
that the members will devote the entire evenings to 
study and will not entertain speakers from time to 
time as the custom of the club has been in the past. 
Aside from study this club has time for philan- 
thropic work, especially are they active at Christmas 
time, helping to spread cheer where most needed. 
Mrs. Grace Carpenter heads this department. 



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Page 32 



The CLUBWOMAN 



WOMEN'S AUXILIARY OF THE 
.RAILWAY MAIL ASS'N. 

By Mrs. M. I. Clemmer, Press Chairman 
Activities of the Women's Auxiliary of the Railway 
Mail Association were resumed on September 28, with 
a luncheon at The Samovar, on Wilshire Blvd. Mrs. 
H. H. Graham, newly elected president, very charm- 
ingly presided, giving evidence of her ability in 
leadership. The feature of the day was an inspiring 
talk by Mrs. J. B. Lorbeer, District President of the 
Federation. She emphasized the present-day oppor- 
tunities and advantages, reminding us that it took 
70 years for women to obtain the ballot — so the chal- 
lenge of today is to make good. With enthusiasm she 
reviewed the departmental work of the Federation 
and brought home to each individual the responsi- 
bility of a world work, closing her remarks with an 
appeal for conservation and stimulation of construc- 
tive forces. 

Mrs. John B. Good, chairman of Program Commit- 
tee presented Miss Marie Chewning, who delighted 
the club members with two piano selections, and 
Martha Foulks Hahn of Hollywood presented Bonnie 
May Long in several snappy readings. 

The president and officers for the coming year are: 
Mrs. H. H. Graham President; Mrs. John,B. Good, 
1st Vice President; Mrs. Dr. Floyd Jackman, 2nd Vice 
President; Mrs. John W. Holland, Corresponding Sec- 
retary; Mrs. Chas. T. Beresford, Recording Secretary; 
Mrs. Karl Schneider, Treasurer; Mrs. Geo. H. Poor- 
man, Federation Secretarv. 



COLLEGE WOMEN'S CLUB OF 
LONG BEACH 

By Grace E. Irvin, Press Chairman 
The first meeting of the members of the College 
Women's Club of Long Beach, occurring on the eve- 
ning of October 6 was a brilliant social affair. The 
meeting place was the spacious banquet room, located 
on the second floor, of the new Y. W. C. A. build- 
ing. Here individual tables, each presided over 
by its own hostess, were beautifully decorated by 
baskets and bowls filled with lovely fall blossoms. 
There were places for two hundred guests at the 
tables and, to promote good fellowship and augment 
acquaintanceship, each table was numbered and seats 
were allotted by numbered slips. 

Mrs. Gertrude Johnston Fisher, first vice president 
of the club, presiding in the absence of the president, 
Mrs. O. P. Bell, called a short business meeting after 
the dinner and asked Mrs. Stanton, recording secre- 
tary, to read the minutes of the last executive board 
meeting. Among those who afterward spoke was 
Miss Julia Ellen Rogers, second vice president, who 
made a plea for support of the Literary theatre. 
This production is entering upon its third season 
in Long Beach and is this year under the sponsorship 
of the College Women's Club. Mrs. Fisher introduced 
all the officers and committee chairmen for the cur- 
rent year and asked that each stand, as she was intro- 
duced, that she might be known by every member of 
the club. 

An interesting two-hour musical program, follow- 
ing the excellent dinner was presented by the Neblett 
Concert Trio of Los Angeles. The trio consists of 
Leona Neblett, violinist; James Murray, baritone; 
Raymond McFeeters, pianist. The excellency of the 
program bespeaks the high standard which the pro- 
gram committee has set for the year's work, and the 
expressions of enjoyment uttered, as. well as the 
hearty applause rendered each selection by the audi- 
ence, indicate the keen apprciation felt for the won- 
derful technique of the three musicians. 



LA CANADA THURSDAY CLUB 

Mrs. Robert Westmeyer 

Our new club year began October 8 with a graci- 
ous greeting from our new president, Mrs. H. L. 
Hayman. 

Through the fine generosity of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. 
Howard, we own a lot in Woodleigh Lane, and have 
a club fund of about $2300 started. That is our big 
enthusiasm this year. 

All of our sections have many plans for the com- 
ing months. Mrs. C. H. Ponder, curator of the Art 
section, is striving to give practical help. Mrs. J. N. 
Maynard of the Literary section also has many in- 
teresting plans. 

We are sponsoring the Camp Fire work and under 
the direction of Miss Lois Simpson, have nineteen 
girls in the council. 

Mrs. P. H. Johnson has been elected District Chair- 
man of Junior memberships and Mrs. E. A. Kantel 
chairman of International Relations. 



ECHO PARK MOTHER'S CLUB 

By Patricia C. Anderson, Press Chairman 

The official opening and house warming of the 
Echo Park Mother's Club at 1004 Echo Park Ave., 
took place October 7. Invitations were extended to 
city officials, leading cLub women, community leaders 
and friends of the members. 

Board of directors of the club acted as hostesses, 
the receiving hours were from 2 to 5 p. m. 

Mrs. Chas. M. Swinnerton, chairman of music, pre- 
sented a delightful program throughout the afternoon. 
Mrs. Gladys Kinmont, chairman of home economics 
assisted by a committee to pour tea. 

In the evening the members entertained their fam- 
ilies and friends with a masque ball. Over five 
hundred were present. 

Plans are under way for the bazaar to be held 
November 14. A cordial invitation is given to our 
club friends to come. The proceeds will go to our 
club house payment fund. 



1925-26 SOUTHWEST BLUE 
BOOK 

Those interested, from the broadest standpoint, in 
Southern California club life, will find the recently 
issued 1925-26 Southwest Blue Book a specially valu- 
able aid to their year's activities. This little volume, 
edited and published annually by Lenora H. King, 
well known for her newspaper work on the western 
coast, is primarily a roster of fashionable society, and 
is recognized both here and in the East as a standard 
publication, having no peer among reference works* 
of its class. In addition to the main body of the 
book, however, is a club section which rivals in im- 
portance the society roster itself, so full and compre- 
hensive has it been made. 

Both women's clubs and those for men are given. 
There are country and other pleasure clubs; residence 
clubs, and clubs for study — federated and unfederated 
organizations being listed. Officers are named and 
places of meeting designated, and the classification 
is so clear cut that the book becomes most convenient 
for hasty reference. 

The Southwest Blue Book, which is now in its 
twenty-third year, has known no other editor than 
Lenora H. King, whose long acquaintance with soci- 
ety and club life of Los Angeles and vicinity makes 
her an acknowledged authority along these lines, 
and her Southwest Blue Book is in very general de- 
mand among women who represent both phases of 
activity. 



NOVEMBER, 1925 



Page 33 



FRIDAY MORNING CLUB 

{Continued from Page 7) 
Mr. Rothwell's consent to the plan had been obtained, 
the most wonderful program ever presented before 
any woman's club in the world was assured, and on 
February 29, 1924, presented at the Philharmonic 
Auditorium (where we were then meeting) before a 
capacity audience. 

The Philharmonic Trio, Calmon Luboviski, violin; 
Earl Bright, 'cello; Alfred Kastner, harp, gave a 
program which was the cause of Myra Nye giving 
the club a big write-up in the Times the following 
Sunday morning. The December program was given 
bj a number of local singers, presenting a number of 
scenes from operas, in costume, under the direction 
of Mrs. Charles Bowes. Marjorie Dodge, soprano, 
made her first professional appearance in the city 
before our Club and was assisted by Squire Coop, 
accompanist, and a score of young women from 
U. C. S. B., who sang Debussy's "Blessed Damosel." 

The Club has introduced to its members several 
very worth-while Russian artists, Dobrohotoff, Bala- 
laika player; George Skultetsky, baritone; Alexander 
Kosloff, pianist, and Lizetta Kalova, violinist. 

The Selling String Quartette, with Mrs. Batchelder 
at the piano, gave a program which still lingers in 
my mind as one of the most satisfying during four 
years. 

Mildred Marsh, Ida Selby Donnell, and Claire 
Forbes Crane (now Claire Mellinino), pianists; Mrs. 
Selby, contralto; Morris Stoloff, violinist; Carl Gant- 
voort, baritone; Corinne Harris, soprano; Thad Har- 
vey, tenor; Mrs. Bowes, accompanist, and the Russian 
String Quartette, which gave such delightful ending 
to the year, were the other artists appearing before 
the Club during '23-24. 

Only six musical programs were given during last 



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year — oh yes, seven, because Bronson DeCou pre- 
sented "Dream Pictures Around the World." This 
was charged against my budget, because the Ampico 
furnished the "necessary atmosphere." The program 
was so thoroughly enjoyed that I am delighted to 
have him on my list again this year, when he will 
show his new slides of "Dream Pictures of the Medi- 
terranean." 

Miss Jennie L. Jones, Supervisor of the Orchestras 
of the Elementary Schools, gave us a most inspiring 
and interesting morning, with 60 pupil players from 
the different school orchestras of the city. Five of 
the leading women composers of the city, Mrs. Rob- 
inson, Grace Freebey, Gertrude Ross, Elinor 'Warren 
and Beatrice Fenner, were presented in a program 
of their own composition. Ruth May Shaffner, so- 
prano; Homer Simmons, pianist, and Raymond Mc- 
Feeters, accompanist, brought to us a refreshing pro- 
giam, being three of the best of our younger artists. 

Claire Forbes Crane and Calmon Luboviski played 
a most delightful Grieg sonata, and on the same 
morning a very talented and accomplished pianist, 
Julia Bal de Zuniga, played two groups. 

The only out of town artist was John Claire Mon- 
teith. 

The last program of the year was an all-Russian, 
with so many great artists, all in the colorful Russian 
costume, that the morning seemed too good to be true. 

Lizetta Kalova, violinist; Alexander Kosloff, pian- 
ist; Ivan Suchoff, baritone; Mme. Seiffert, soprano; 
Fay Adler and Claire Ganon, solo dancers; a com- 
plete Russian Ballet and Balalaika Orchestra; and 
Alexander Comansky, who not only arranged the 
entire program, but danced two solo dances as only 
a great Russian dancer can. 

We have a wonderful year ahead of us, with many 
programs already outlined. 




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The CLUBWOMAN 



LOS ANGELES TUESDAY 
AFTERNOON CLUB 

By Effie fVebster, Press Chairman 

The Los Angeles Tuesday Afternoon Club held 
its first meeting of the year on October 6, at the 
home of Mary L. Parker, 302 Milton Ave. 

After the pleasant greetings, and vacation experi- 
ences vpere told, plans for the year's work were dis- 
cussed. This Club, though limited in membership, 
is very enthusiastic. 

The president appointed as chairmen of various 
committees the following named ladies: 

Citizenship, Mrs. Mary Snyder; History and Land- 
marks, Mrs. Minnie Gray; Home Economics, Mrs. 
Flora Gustin; Child Welfare, Mrs. Mary L. Parker; 
Historian, Mrs. Margaret Mickey. 



BIG PINE FRIDAY AFTER- 
NOON STUDY CLUB 

By Mrs. Thomas Webb, Press Chairman 
The Friday Afternoon Study Club of Bigpine 
began its new year with a Founders' day breakfast, 
September 11 at 12:30 p. m. in the Community Hall. 
Covers were laid for fifty members and guests. 

The tables were beautifully decorated with flowers 
ill the club colors — brown and green and gold — and 
laden with fruits and choice viands. After a few 
\i'ords of greeting from the toastmistress, Mrs. Thomas 
Webb, the assembly with crossed-joined hands sang 
Auld Lang Syne. Mrs. Roy Willis proposed a toast 
to "Our Club Founder and President Emeritus." Mrs. 
W. G. Dixon, now of Los Angeles. Mrs. Ira Uhlmeyer 
responded with "Greetings" from that lady in answer 
to an invitation to be present. A toast to "Our New 
President" from Mrs. P. W. Bunney brought a gra- 
cious reply from Mrs. Ira Uhlmeyer and a synopsis 
of the work planned for the coming year. A toast 
from the County President, Mrs. E. H. Edwards, to 
"Club President in General" was given in her usual 
humorous manner and was followed by Mrs. O. C. 
Houghton, who spoke on "Woman," paying her the 
splendid tribute due her in the world of today. Mrs. 
Thomas Webb gave a brief outline of the Club His- 
tory and extended an invitation to all the women of 
the community who are interested in the work to join 
its membership. A suite of three well-rendered piano 
solos by Miss Maxine Brown and a "mirth-provok- 
ing" reading by Mrs. A. N. Davison closed the pro- 
gram, after which the president called a short business 
meeting. Three names were presented for member- 
ship and the new year books, the handiwork of Mrs. 
Iia Uhlmeyer and Mrs. Harry Mendenhall, dis- 
tributed. 

The club is just entering its tenth year. As its name 
implies it is strictly a study club; meeting on the 
second and fourth Fridays of every month with the 
exception of July and August, from 2 to 4 o'clock 
p. m. The greater portion of the time is given to the 
topic for the day, the remainder to business and 
Federation work. Its motto is "Neglect not the gift 
that is in thee." Its emblem, the Bigpine tree, from 
which the town received its name was chosen to sym- 
bolize the height and breadth of the club's aspirations 
along its line of study. Its colors, brown and green 
and gold — brown and green the somber hues of the 
pine bark and needles; gold — the brilliancy of the 
sunlight, typifying the bright and shining light the 
club would wish to radiate in its little community. A 
travel course through Egypt, India, China and Rus- 
sia has been chosen by the program committee for the 
year's work. With an energetic new president and 
an attractive topic, the members are looking forward 
to a very profitable and enjoyable year. 



THE WOMEN'S IMPROVE- 
MENT CLUB OF BLYTHE 

Florence Ansley Utting 

The Women's Improvement Club of Blythe is pio- 3 
neer in its genesis and spirit, but down-to-date in its 
interests and activities. Founded in 1910, by a hand- 
ful of Palo Verde Valley women as a social outlet for 
otherwise widely separated and busy lives, it has 
grown into a civic organization comparable, in value 
if not size, to its more sophisticated sister clubs. 

One wonders just how Blj'the and its encircling 
rich valley would manage without the "Women's 
Club," for the welfare and progress of the entire com- 
munity are the voluntary charge of this public spirited 
Association, whose motto might well be "The Home 
Valley first, and then the State." 

A busy and interesting year is outlined by the cur- 
rent Year Book, prominent in its agenda being a 
Cotton Carnival to be held this fall. The Board of 
Directors and the various committees appear espe- 
cially strong, and a successful season is predicted. 



KATE TUPPER GALPIN 
SHAKESPEARE CLUB 

Mrs. Elizabeth C. Fisher, Press Chairman 

On Wednesday, October 14, at the University 
Women's Club house, the Kate Tupper Galpin Shakes- 
peare Club held its initial meeting for the new term. 

After the business meeting, which was presided 
over by the President, Mrs. Harry Bender, Mrs. 
Opal Dempster took charge of the program. This 
took up "Reforestation" and Shakespeare's love of 
the forests. Mrs. Dempster read a paper on the trees 
mentioned by Shakespeare, and the club members 
were surprised to hear how many of them were not 
natives of Great Britain but had been introduced 
into England, generally from continental Europe, long 
before Shakespeare's time — thus showing England's 
early interest in forestry. 

Mrs. Robert Robinson read an original poem writ- 
ten at Crater Lake, and Mrs. LeRoy Bailey gave one 
of Shakespeare's most charming forest scenes, selected 
from "As You Like It." 

Some short quotations along the general lines of 
the program were given and appropriate vcoal solos 
given by Mrs. R. J. Gillespie, added to the pleasure 
of the occasion. 



LAST WEEKS OF "NO, NO, 
NANETTE" 

"No, No, Nanette," Edward D. Smith's musical 
comedy sensation enters upon its last weeks at the 
Biltmore Theatre and the final performance will take 
place on Saturday evening, November 14. "No, No, 
Nanette" will leave Los Angeles with a record of 
twenty-four capacity weeks, including the seventeen 
week run at the Mason last Spring. It is probable 
that every playgoer in this city has witnessed the 
tuneful Mandel-Youmans musical comedy by this 
time, but those who have not will do well to make 
haste in view of the announcement of the final weeks. 
This period will undoubtedly constitute the final op- 
portunities to see this famous hit here as Producer 
Smith has arranged a road tour which will keep the 
organization touring until next August. The cast 
remains as previously with Taylor Holmes and Nancy 
Welford as the featured principals and including 
Maria Wells, Angie Norton, Willard Hall, Jean Nash, 
Gardiner Hart, Pauline French, Mia Marvia and 
Madeline Lester. Then, of course, there is the chorus 
of California beauties and last but not least, the 
famous song hits "Tea for Two" and "I Want to Be 
Happy." 



^ 



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T^ecember 
1925 

Vol. XVI - No. 3 



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THE CLUBWOMAN 



Vol. XVI DECEMBER, 1925 No. 3 

Published Monthly Office, 521 Grant Bldg., Los Angeles 

Telephone EL. 2734; if no answer, VAndike 0111 

Subscription Price SO Cents Per Year, Ten Cents the Copy Send subscriptions to Mrs. Bert Clifford, Box 26, 

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Edited by the Press Chairmen of the Clubs Represented 
Entered at the South Pasadena Postoffice as second-class matter. 



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The CLUBWOMAN 



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Main Office and Plant 
In Our Own Building 

2207-9 MAPLE AVENUE 




Branch Office 
2706 W. SEVENTH ST. 

Near Rampart 
WEstmore 2059 ^^5fe<^' WAshington 1511 

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 

Our Cars Call in Pasadena and So. Pasadena Tuesdays and Fridays 



DECEMBER, 1925 



Page 5 



Contents 



<"''*_» 



Los Angeles Ebell - 6 

Friday Morning Club 8 

Woman's Club of San Pedro 12 

Woman's Club of Hollywood 13 

Southern District, California Federation of Busi- 
ness and Professional Women's Clubs 16 

The Women's University Club 17 

Pasadena Shakespeare Club 21 

Woman's Club of Hawthorne 23 

Highland Park Ebell 23 

South Side Ebell 24 

Saugus Community Club 25 

Woman's Auxiliary, R..M. A 25 

College Women's Club of Long Beach 28 

Galpin Shakespeare Club _ 28 

Woman's Improvement Club of Corona 29 

Echo Park Mothers' Club 30 

Long Beach Ebell _ 31 

Philanthropy and Civics Club 32 

Averill Study Club 33 

Woman's Club of Downey 34 



GIFTS 
BOOKLOVERS 

You can't go wrong when you 
choose books for Christmas giving. 
BOOKS are always timely, appro- 
priate, welcome. 

OUR BOOK SECTION is equip- 
ped to fill the needs of any book- 
lover. 



The JONES 



Opposite 

s^u'a""' BOOK Store 

Lo« Angeles, California 

- TRinity 431 1 



426-428 
West 
Sixth 



I 



WOMAN'S CLUB OF HUNTING- 
TON PARK 

What promises to be a most successful and enthu- 
siastic year, opened September 25 with a reception and 
program in the afternoon, at St. Clement's Parish 
House, the meeting-place of the Woman's Club this 
year. Mrs. Alan P. Dibble, president, voiced her 
ideal to be accomplished this year as "service to the 
community." A charming musical program was given 
by the "Musical Three,," Edna Earle Pierce, soprano; 
Mary Belle Gunther, whistler; Helen Littlejohn, con- 
tralto. 

Three thriving sections, averaging a large atten- 
dance, have begun their year's work. The English 
section, Mrs. Herman C. Schultz, curator, is promised 
great pleasure and profit from the lectures of Mrs. 
Jack Valleley, the instructor, so well known in this 
line of work with women's clubs. The Music Section 
again has the services this year of Mr. David S. 
Wright who succeeded so well last year with the 
chorus. The curator of this section is Mrs. R. C. 
Ellison. The Drama Section, Mrs. A. A. McCormick, 
curator, is most enthusiastic over the work as outlined 
and begun by Mrs. Ursula March Largey, instructor. 

The club lot is already half paid for, and the Ways 
and Means Committees are working hard and adding 
substantial amounts to the building fund. 

A spirit of friendliness pervades every phase of the 
work of the Woman's club, and the pleasant social 
contact in the meetings as well as the intellectual 
stimulus gained there, is bringing many new mem- 
bers into the club. 



E.]H,PYAS CO. 

JTHA.T OILIVE 



rr 



The Londi 



prepares 

for 
Christmas 

1925 

Suggesting to 
Sportswomen, 
gifts of good 
taste and useful- 
ness ! 



Riding Crops: $2.50 to $12.50 
Driving Gloves: $3.50 to $8.50 
Scarfs: $1.95 to $7.50 
Sports Hosiery: $1.25 to $6.50 
Sweaters: $3.95 to $22.50 

THE WOMEN'S SPORT SHOP 
LOWER MAIN FLOOR 





d 



J^- 



Page 6 



The CLUBWOMAN 



, TjOiy- •Aw6etcG;s- -eaeiiii 



Mrs. Ediuard A. Tufts, Chairman of Press 




[The following paper, written by Mary Men- 
denhall Perkins and read before the Art and 
Travel department of the Ebell Club, is of such 
general interest to club women as well as to the 
art lovers of the city, that it is being sent as 
Ebell's contribution to the Clubwoman.] 

"The Los Angeles Museum will open on 
November 27, the most important art exhibition 
which has ever been assembled here, an exhibi- 
tion which is only comparable to the great art 
section of the Panama-Pacific Exposition in 
1915. Two hundred and fifty paintings by the 
artists of the United States and Canada, together 
with more than one hundred paintings by the 
artists of Mexico, Central America and the 
West Indies and South America, have been 
assembled to commemorate the opening of the 
first unit of the new museum structure. The 
plans which the Allied Architects have devised 
for the new Los Angeles Museum call for con- 
struction by units, the plan which has been fol- 
lowed by the Metropolitan Museum in develop- 
ing space. The completed structure vi^ill repre- 
sent eight units to be built at such times as 
seem best. The first unit has now been con- 
structed, the second will be added in the near 
future. When the last unit is built the present 
museum will disappear and a unified facade will 
face the sunken gardens. 

It is fitting that an exhibition which is unique 
in concept should be assembled to commemorate 
an event of such importance to the growth of 
the community. Dr. Bryan, director of the mu- 
seum, has long wished to assemble an exhibi- 
tion representing the art of the two America's 
exclusively. The continent to the south of us 
has for a long time been more familiar to Euro- 
peans than to North Americans. The occasion 
of the opening of the new unit of the museum 
seemed a fitting one for carrying out this Pan- 
American plan. Each South American country 
was asked to send a quota of paintings, this 
quota being based on the population and the rel- 
ative artistic importance of the country. Dr. 
Bryan traveled to Mexico City, to Havana, and 
points in Central America to arrange for repre- 
sentation and found everj^vhere a spirit of cor- 
dial co-operation and an eager acceptance of the 
idea — greater sympathy and understanding be- 
tween the artists of the new world. 

To actually bring to Los Angeles the works 
of these painters has required persuasion, careful 
planning and infinite patience. When one real- 
izes that it takes longer to get a letter from the 



east coast of South America than to send and 
receive an answer from any of the countries 
of Europe, one may understand some of the dif- 
ficulties involved in bringing together this col- 
lection of paintings. But during the past three 
months steamers have been putting out from 
various South American ports carrying in their 
holds cases of paintings addressed to the local 
museum. A number of these cases had to come 
by way of New York for trans-shipment via the 
canal at Panama to Los Angeles. Others came 
direct to Christobal and were transferred there 
to boats coming up the west coast. Still others 
came to New Orleans and thence by freight or 
express across the southern part of the United 
States. Thirteen of the Latin-American paint- 
ers who are at present living in France or Spain 
have sent canvases from those countries. This 
shipment was arranged by the European repre- 
sentatives of the museum, Miss Palmer of Ma- 
drid and Mr. Lerolle of Paris, who has also 
acted as agent for the assembling of the annual 
Carnegie International Exhibition at Pittsburgh. 
One boat which left New York for the canal 
carried over half a million dollars' worth of 
paintings for the museum. This was the ship- 
ment in which most of the North American sec- 
tion was included. The three most valuable 
paintings in this group were the Childe Hassam, 
the Eugene Savage and the Gari Melchers, val- 
ued at $15,000, $10,000 and $12,000, respec- 
tively. 

Among the painters from the United States 
whose work is especially well known, the follow- 
ing may be noted : Childe Hassam, one of the 
great figures in American art. The painting 
which he is sending is a very large canvas called 
"April, 1859." It is beautiful in coloring and 
composition and would be remarked in any col- 
lection as an outstanding work. Gari Melchers, 
who is one of the deans of painting in America, 
will be represented by a large canvas entitled 
"MacPherson and MacDonald," two Scotch 
bagpipers, a colorful and interesting painting 
which will attract much attention. Frank Ben- 
son, another of the older men belonging to the 
New England group who have contributed so 
much to the development of art in America, has 
sent a lovely interior, showing a woman seated by 
a table. In coloring and arrangement it is a very 
pleasing picture. E. W. Redfield is well known 
for his depiction of the eastern landscapes, espe- 
cially in winter. Mary Cassatt, perhaps the 
greatest of the women painters in America, who 



DECEMBER. 1925 



Page 7 



shares honors with Cecilia Beaux in this respect, 
has sent a delightful painting called "Maternal 
Caress," sho'wing a mother holding a small 
child. Miss Cassatt has always been very happy 
in her portrayal of maternity, both in her etch- 
ings and in oils. Eugene Savage has sent a large 
painting, decorative in nature, called "Reces- 
sional," in which the background is rendered ex- 
tremely interesting by the figures of the Four 
Horsemen of the Apocah-pse. The foreground is 
held by the slender figure of a lovely woman 
and child. 

The exhibition, as it is planned, will give the 
spectator an opportunity for the comparison of 
various trends of art in the Americas. Espe- 
cially interesting should be the comparison be- 
tween the Indians of the southern part of West- 
ern Hemisphere, as portrayed by the artists of 
South America and Mexico, and those Indians 
of our own Southwest, whom we have come to 
know through the excellent work of our own 
artists at Taos and Santa Fe : Victor Higgins and 
Walter Ufer, Ernest Blumenschein and Andrew 
Dasburg, Luis Mora and B. J. O. Nordfelt are 
a number of the artists who have worked in this 
region and left a record which is at once sincere 
and fine. 

Of the eastern artists whose work will be in- 
cluded in the exhibition are Daniel Garber, 
Gardner Symons, Robert Vonnoh, Gifford Beal. 
Emil Carlson, F. C. Frieseke, W. J. Glackens, 
Charles W. Hawthorne, Robert Henri, Charles 
Hopkinson, Henry Lee McFee, John Noble, 
Frederick Ballard Williams, and Charles H. 
Woodbury. Among the younger men the work 
of Karl Anderson, Hugh Breckenridge, John 
Carroll, Preston Dickenson, John C. Johanson, 
Bernard Karfiol, Rockwell Kent, Leon Kroll, 
Kenneth Hayes Miller, Jerome. Myers, John 
Sloan and Jonas Lie should be especially noted. 

One hundred and fifty paintings were invited 
for this exhibition from United States artists. 
Seventy-five were to be selected by jury compe- 
tition. Preliminary juries were held at New 
York, Chicago and Los Angeles in order to ac- 
commodate the artists living in the east, the 
middle west and the west. At New York Ken- 
neth Hayes Miller, Jerome Myers and John 
Costigan decided the paintings which should be 
chosen from those submitted for consideration. 
At Chicago, Leopold Seyfert, Anthony Angarola 
and Carl Krafft acted as the jury. At Los An- 
geles, Armin Hansen, William Wendt and Wil- 




Mrs. Lurah Davis, Art Chairman, Los Angeles 
Ebell Club 

— Photo by Witzel. 

Ham Clapp, director of the Oakland Art Gal- 
lery, made the selection for the west. Great 
interest was manifested in the jury for this ex- 
hibition and nearly 250 paintings were submit- 
ted to the various juries. At Los Angeles alone 
150 canvases, representing 120 artists, were • 
submitted ; of these only twenty were worthy 
to be selected, in the opinion of the jury. 

There are a number of prizes to be awarded 
in connection with this exhibit. The museum 
itself is offering a first prize of $500, together 
with four honorable mentions, each of which 
will carry an honorarium. In addition to these 
prizes there is the Mr. and Mrs. Allan C. Balch 
purchase prize of $5,000, which represents the 
greatest single suni that has yet been offered for 

{Continued on Page 3+) 



SILENT SINGING 

Exercises by which great singers build and restore the 

voice. Equally valuable for the health and speaking 

voice of those who do not sing. 

Mme. Irwin Kellogg 

Friday Morning Qub House, Mondays and Thursdays. 
Res. Phone WHitney 7793 tUcker 6288 



GRACE ADELE FREEBEY 

Pianist and Teacher of Piano 
Studio — Friday Morning Club House 

940 So. Figueroa Street 
Phone TUcker 6288 Residence Phone 52969 



Page 8 



The CLUBWOMAN 



iiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiil 

FRIDAY t^ORNING Cm7B 

iiiiiiiinMiiiiiiii 



A Plea for Scholarship 

By Mrs. Charles F. Turner, Second Vice-President 



Scholarship work is one of the most satisfac- 
tory as well as one of the most necessary of phil- 
anthropies, for it provides an outlet for our emo- 
tional longings to do good, contributes to the 
betterment of social and economic conditions, as 
well as enlightening one class to the actual state 
of affairs in another, and by creating an under- 
standing between the two, offers sympathy and 
help. 

It satisfies the emotional craving to do good 
because there is no appeal greater than that 
made by an unfortunate child. On the street, 
on the screen, anywhere, a hungry or unhappy 
child sounds the note of pathos and our emo- 
tions immediately respond. People who have 
children of their own realize how great unhap- 
piness may come to the child who cannot have 
and do as the other children do, and their hearts 
yearn to help such a child. The joys and sor- 
rows of childhood, often caused by trivial things, 
assume gigantic proportions to the child, and 
when that child becomes a man his whole con- 
ception of life may be warped by these childish 
experiences of injustice or misfortune. Child- 
hood should be a happy time and give these citi- 
zens of tomorrow a foundation of joy and happy 
memories, and scholarship work is one means of 
securing that end. 

It has a social effect because children who are 
enabled to concentrate on school work rather 
than on trying to make both ends meet have a 
greater comprehension of their duties as citizens 
and are being taught and trained to carry out 
those duties. When children are obliged to 
work out of school hours, their thoughts are oc- 
cupied with all the problems of how to keep 
their job, or find a new one, or get more pay, 
and their energy is used up in material strug- 
gles so that they lack both time and strength for 
proper preparation of their studies and for the 
normal social activities of school. These social 
activities are the child's only contact with others 
of his kind and they train him to a realization 
and adjustment of the rights of the individual 
in relation to the mass. 

Scholarship work is of economic value because 
through more knowledge and vocational training 
the, child is taught ways and means of earning a 
livelihood. High schools, especially in the poorer 
districts, specialize today in trying to fit the 
child to the work he wishes and is able to do. 
The advent of vocational guidance and training 
is going to lower most perceptibly the percentage 




Mrs. Charles F. Turner, Second Vice-president, 
Friday Morning Club 

—Photo by Witzel. 

of misfits in life. The child, on his entrance to 
school, is given a list of trades showing how long 
it takes to prepare for each, the cost of equip- 
ment for such preparation, what wages may be 
earned at first, what is the prospect for advance- 
ment with its proportionate wage, and the chance 
of getting a job in that kind of work — that is 
how crowded is that particular field of labor. 

And, lastly, scholarship work is a liberal edu- 
cation to any club or individual who undertakes 
it. The majority of women, particularly women 
in moderate circumstances, have very little idea 
of the seamy side of life. Scholarship investiga- 



DECEMBER. 192$ 



Page 9 



tion enlightens them as to how women like them- 
selves, through sickness or sudden death or great 
financial reverses, are often left alone and desti- 
tute. How many of us could go out into the 
world tomorrow morning and feel assured that 
we could earn a living for ourselves and our 
children? 

Also, how many of us keep in touch with the 
new phases of education ? How many of us 
could give an intelligible explanation of the new 
psychological tests and to what uses they are put, 
the new ideas in physical or in visual education ? 
How many of us know the type of women who 
teach and counsel the girls in our high schools? 
I count it my very great privilege to personally 
know nearly every girls' vice-principal in the 
Los Angeles high schools, and a finer, more self- 
sacrificing group of women I cannot imagine. 
When cases of need arise, their purses are open ; 
when problems vex, their leisure time is gladly 
given. To girls with no mothers they act the 
part of financial adviser, counsellor and friend. 
Teachers of Los Angeles, all honor to you ! 

Since we have ready to hand our public school 
system, \vhich is trying to adapt itself to the 
most efficient way of training our youth for life, 
can we not somehow from our abundance pro- 
vide the child who otherwise would not have 
it, with a chance to help himself? We may dif- 
fer as to thc' respective rights of the individual. 




j\Irs. Carrie S. Greene, Treasurer, Friday 
Morning Club 

—Phoio by IVilzel. 



The Los Angeles 

Slizabeth oArden 

Salon 

•with 

J. W. ROBINSON CO. 

UNDER the direct management of 
Miss Arden and her New York staff 
and offering the same specialized treat- 
ments that have made Miss Arden's other 
salons internationally known. 

SEVENTH FLOOR 




Page 10 



The CLUBWOMAN 



but we are all agreed that every child has an 
inherent right to a chance in life. Scholarship 
work bestows that chance on the child. 

The awarding of scholarships should be most 
carefully considered, because scholarship work 
is not charity, and is related to charity only as 
material needs must be satisfied before mental 
activity or productivity can result. Scholarships 
should be given only on certain conditions: 

First, that help is really necessary. Each 
case should be investigated by trained peo- 
ple, to be sure that parents are not trying 
to exploit the child by putting him to work 
instead of working themselves. 

Second, that the child wishes help that 
she may avail herself of the advantages 
school has to offer. In such cases the value 
of an education is increased by the chiM's 
appreciation of the fact that it is a privilege 
bestowed upon her rather than just a hap- 
pening, to be accepted or not as the impulse 
dictates, and she generally works the harder 
so as to lose nothing which it may be pos- 
sible to gain. 

Third, that the child receiving the schol- 
arship should be held responsible to the peo- 
ple giving it, and that someone in the school 
should be ready and willing to co-operate 
with both giver and recipient. 

The Friday Morning Club is giving a thou- 
sand dollars for scholarship work this year, and 
having in mind the things mentioned above, 
these scholarships have been awarded in accord- 
ance with the recommendations of the Scholar- 
ship Committee, which consists of Mrs. Jennie 
Helen Keen, chairman, Mrs. Charles Burnell, 
member of the board, Mrs. C. M. McRoberts, 
a past president of the Parent-Teacher Federa- 
tion, and myself. This committee visited many 
schools, talked with the teachers, saw the stu- 
dents as they passed on their daily rounds, inter- 
viewed the girls for vv^hom scholarships had 
been asked, and carefully deliberated over the 
reports of family conditions, as well as the con- 
duct, rating of the applicant in her classes, and 
her general contribution to the life of the school. 
These recommendations for the giving of the 
scholarships and which were passed by the board 
of directors, are : 

1. Since we are a women's club and par- 
ticularly interested in the welfare of 
women, we recommend that this year help 
be given to girls alone. There are many 
men's organizations which help boys, and 
it is not so hard for boys to get work out- 
side of school hours. Girls have fewer op- 
portunities and need more rest and looking 
after morally and physically. 

2. That since a thousand dollars is not 
capable of indefinite expansion, we recom- 



mend that the work be spread over as great 
an area as possible. For this reason, after 
one scholarship had been given in a school, 
we had to refer many deserving cases to 
other organizations, because we; felt that no 
partiality could be shown. 

3. We recommend that all scholarships 
shall be given for merit. We hear people 
talk of good investments. What do they 
mean? That when they have money to in- 
vest, they carefully look around for a place 
to put it from which there will be a safe 
and an adequate return. So it is with schol- 
arships. We invest in the lives of those who 
in return will contribute to the building up 
of society. The girl who barely makes her 
grades or who is not any particular asset to 
her class or to the school may be just as 
hungry, but there are charitable agencies 
of various kinds through which she may re- 
ceive help, and the scholarship work of the 
Friday Morning Club is not charity, but 
an investment in merit whose interest will 
be as bread upon the waters, returning after 
many days. The girls selected are in the 
last two years of high school and have had 
a straight record of A ever since they have 
been in the various schools. These girls are 
getting all that the school has to offer, while 
girls who make their grades with difficulty, 
or fail, might be better off to be permitted 
to leave school and take up employment 
which would be more congenial arid for 
which they are better fitted. Many vice- 
principals told me they had advised such 
girls to leave school and go to work. 

Besides the recommendation for scholarship 
because of financial needs and leadership in stud- 
ies, each girl is vouched for morally by the vice- 
principal, in whose care the check is sent, al- 
though it is made out to the girl personally. 
This keeps the triangular relation between giver, 
recipient and adviser. 

In addition to the regular scholarships, the 
club is giving fifteen dollars a month to three 
different schools, such a fund to be used for 
emergency work in clothing, food, or whatever 
may be needed to give temporary relief. One 
principal told me that every Monday morning 
there were many empty seats because father lost 
his job Saturday night. This funds helps keep 
such children from dropping out until father 
finds another job, and accomplishes an almost 
incredible amount of help in proportion to the 
sum expended. 

Plans are now under consideration for th:^ 
creating of a special fund to be so invested that 
the interest, plus a small additional amount 
each year, shall be available as a permanent, con- 
stantly-revolving sum for this very necessary and 



DECEMBER, 1925 



Page 11 



Removal Sale 
25% Discount 

Great Bargains 

Rare and Unusual Presents 

Something for Everybody 

Modern and Antique Jewelry 

ff'e move December 31 to our 

Art and Antique Galleries 

IIJ3 So. Hoover 



222-24 W. Ninth St. 

Phone TUcker 1779 



Page 12 



The CLUBWOMAN 



worth-while work. The Friday Morning Club, 
having built its own beautiful home and having 
put its own affairs in order, now seeks to assume 
a more prominent place in the philanthropies of 
Los Angeles. 



FRIDAY MORNING CLUB NOTES 

By Mrs. Frederick Hickok, Press Chairman 

Beside being the largest federated club, with 
all the various activities that pertain to club life, 
the work of the Friday Morning Club includes 
the management of a large building. A woman 
superintendent has charge of all the problems 
incident to such an institution, such as rentals, 
help and salary rolls. 

The work of the club treasurer, Mrs. Carrie 
S. Greene, has grown to be that of a first-class 
qualified financier, as the club has an income of 
one hundred thousand dollars per year. 

In a recent press notice there was the inter- 
esting comment concerning club women who 
give an astonishing amount of hard professional 
work — absolutely without reward of any kind — 
and as regards the press chairmen, they were 
referred to as "ardent amateurs" and admon- 
ished to be "brief, snappy, to use their imagina- 
tion, be individual, original, accurate and inter- 
esting, and they must have the ability to make 
the commonplace notice sound vital." 

In the president's address at the opening day 
of the club Mrs. Clark said: "Once in awhile 
we hear ourselves called commercial. If to have 
a downtovTO club, a home to live in, a mortgage, 
heavy taxes and interest, income property, and 
to manage that property that we may meet our 
needs — if that is becoming commercial, then we 
must plead guilty to that extent. But, if the 
term commercial means that the club is losing its 
ideals, or is failing to give the message it was 
meant to deliver, it might be answered by con- 
sidering the character of the programs it pre- 
sents. 

We are known as a program club. We reach 
our membership through the programs. Many 
attend at no other time. Take the programs for 
any year and you will find that the club has 



never trafficked in club ideals nor placed ex- 
pediency ahead of principle." 

"We have come through the ordeal of recon- 
struction and readjustment with perhaps some 
internal discomfort for we are not a placid club, 
but we have preserved a firm and abiding trust 
in the new order with which our fortunes have 
been cast." 

There will only be three Friday programs in 
December. On December 4, Nancy M. Shoe- 
maker will speak on the subject "International 
Obligations of American Women." "The Mob 
and the Movies" will be the subject for De- 
cember 11. The Christmas program will be 
on December 18 and will be by Tilda Rohr and 
her company of Swiss Yodlers and is entitled "A 
Christmas in Svdtzerland." 



WOMAN'S CLUB OF SAN 
PEDRO 

By Muriel G. Brown 

The Woman's Club of San Pedro opened the season 
auspiciously with a delightful dance at the clubhouse 
the evening of October 2, when Miss Kathleen Clifford, 
popular movie star, was guest of honor. A series of 
benefit dances will be given during the season and a 
season prize is offered to the best exhibitor of the 
Charleston which will be performed at each affair. 

The newly formed lyric division of the club which 
meets weekly has Mr. H. Howard Brown, a dis- 
tinguished voice teacher of the Tapping Brown Stu- 
dios of Los Angeles as director. Each member of 
the section receives instruction in voice control, tone 
pioduction, correct breathing and interpretation. 

The drama section which will meet bi-monthly has 
Mme. Miriam Nelke, an accomplished teacher of 
drama as instructor. At the first meeting Mme. Nelke 
presented a diversified program herself. 

The first luncheon of the club was held October 6, 
at 12:30 p. m., with a large enthusiastic attendance, 
Mrs. H. J. Anderson, re-elected president presiding. 
Mrs. Jack Vallely who is to lead the book section 
this year made a charming luncheon speaker, talking 
in an interesting manner on literature, what it means 
to read books and gave two book reviews. Alma 
Whitaker, feature writer of the Los Angeles Times, 
made a clever talk on feature writing. Following the 
luncheon, Mr. John Claire Monteith, concert baritone, 
gave a delightful and varied program of several 
groups of songs. At the club business meeting later 
the club conference chairmen gave reports. 



Standard dry goods of one quality only — the best. 
New fashions daily augment our assortments. 




SEVENTH STREET AT OLIVE 



DECEMBER, 1925 



Page 13 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 



By Julia Stahl, Press Chairman 



The Woman's Club of Hollywood is noted 
for it many sections in which many things are 
accomplished, but the one that holds the interest 
of the greatest number of members and of which 
the club can be justly proud is its Junior Section, 
made up of daughters of club members or others 
v^ho may be vouched for by two of the club 
members^ This section, starting under the lead- 
ership of Mrs. Rollin B. Lane when she was 
president of the club, has grown from a small 
group of twelve girls to one of over one hun- 
dred. A club member is appointed to act as 
ad^'isor to the girls, but they themselves handle 
all' of their business and social events in addition 
to giving their aid to the club whenever needed. 

Twice a month meetings are held when busi- 
ness is transacted followed by a tea and a short 
program. Dances have been planned for once a 
month during the coming year, a masquerade 
dance having been given in October. In addi- 
tion, however, to social events the Juniors aid 
in many charities, raising the money themselves 
3nd dispensing it as they see fit. For several 
years they have had a number of families to 
which they have brought Christmas cheer in 



the form of clothing, gifts and food. On No- 
vember 28, they held a benefit bridge tea to raise 
the money necessary for this purpose. Marie 
Weinreich is chairman, assisted by Elizabeth 
Colston, Elizabeth Heitmuller, Evelyn Young, 
Alice Morgan and Virginia Vincent. Tickets 
will be 75 cents apiece or $2.00 a table. 

New ofBcers are elected every year by the 
girls, the officers serving the Juniors this year 
being the Misses Elizabeth Colston, president; 
Olive Henry, vice-president; Florence Colston, 
second vice-president ; Gene Robertson, secretary, 
Jipd Virginia Haskins, treasurer. 

The Woman's Club of Hollywood feels that, 
by supporting and encouraging the Junior 
members of the community in this work, thev 
are building up leaders for the coming genera- 
tion. 

Continuing the plan of having a number of 
women serve on the hospitality committee 
throughout the year, rather than a few as in 
years past, Mrs. Harry M. Haldeman was se- 
lected as chairman for hospitality for the month 
of November. Assisting her will be the Mes- 
dames A. S. Walther, Jessie B. Andrews, F. W. 



A. T. BAKER & CO., Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

VELOURS 



and 



CUT VELVETS 

for UPHOLSTERY PURPOSES 



NEW YORK 
41 UNION SQUARE 



LOS ANGELES 
SIXTH AND MAIN STS. 

CENTRAL BLDG. CHICAGO 

Mills: 28 E. JACKSON BLVD. 

Manayunk, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Roxboro, North Carolina 



Page 14 



The CLUBWOMAN 






MISS CAl^LISLE 
T UPPER 

(beloiv) 

Miss Carlisle Tupper 
read •with special dra- 
matic force Kenneth Saw- 
yer Goodman's "Dust of 
the Road" before the 
Highland Park Ebell Club 
recently. Miss Tupper 
showed versatility in 
other numbers of her re- 
cital. She is a former pu- 
pil of Maurice Browne 
and has attained a well 
deserved place among 
the best readers, having 
a pleasing voice and 
charming personality. 





WEDNESDAY 

MORNING 

CLUB 

The spirit of co-opera- 
lion is predominating at 
the Wednesday Mornin.j 
Club this season. Mrs. 
Harold W. Bailey, who 
IS entering on her sec- 
ond term as president, in 
an address given at the 
opening breakfast, said 
"Let W. M. C. have a 
double meaning this year 
Wednesday Morning 
Club and With More Co- 
operation." 



DECEMBER, 1925 



Page 15 



Davey, H. M. O'Malley, H. T. Wright, Alice 
Hickes, L. M. Burntrager, Harmon Ryus, Gavin 
Witherspoon, Thomas Cooke, Guy Hinckley, 
Charles T. Hovey, W. A. E. Noble, A. E. 
Huntington, Charles Strobridge, Frank Des- 
mond, Clarence Rountree, Fannie G. Woodside, 
Henry Taylor, J. H. Hunter, Curtis Kent, 
Charles Kent, Eugene Tilden, Charles S. Reed, 
Jay E. Herrington, Ellet Parcher, D. F. Whit- 
comb, C. E. Bireley and the Misses Jessica Law- 
rence and Eleane Marshall. 

In addition to giving her time and energy to 
the club whenever needed, three silver coffee 
urns were presented as gifts to the club by Mrs. 
Harry M. Haldeman at their last meeting. 

The Woman's Club Chorus, under the chair- 
manship of Mrs. Maud D. Lee Skeen, with 
Hugo Kirchhofer, director, and Inez Jacobson, 
accompanist, are .busily at work planning for 
their first concert of the year to be given in the 
Club Auditorium on the evening of December 
10, when club members and guests are invited 
to attend. It is the plan of the chorus to give 
a series of three concerts during the year. In 
addition to the music furnished by the chorus 
themselves a guest artist will assist at each con- 
cert, Sol Cohen being the one selected by the 
chorus for the first concert. Outsiders as well 
as club members are able to join the Hollywood 
Woman's Club chorus, associate memberships 
are five dollars each, entitling the holder to 
four general admission tickets to each of the 
three concerts. 

The Art Department of the club is also plan- 
ning an active year under the chairmanship of 
Mrs. Roscoe Schrader. A class in design, color 
harmony and applied art was formed the first 
week of November, meeting twice a week under 
the direction of a competent instructor. Mrs. 
Schrader has also planned to have worthwhile 
exhibits in the different lines of art in the lounge 
room of the club where members may examine 
and study them at all times. From October 20 
to November 15 an exhibit of etchings and block 
prints from the Gearhart Studios of Pasadena 
v/ill be on display. Following this exhibit from 
November 15 to 30, a thumb-box exhibit and 
side will be shown in the lounge. These pic- 
tures will be the representative w^ork from forty 
different artists of every school and are limited 
in size to 16-20 inches and will range in prige 
from $5 to $50. Mrs. Schrader will open this 
exhibit at a tea to be given in the lounge of 
the club November 18 following the regular 
afternoon program of the club, from 4 to 6. 
The artists whose work will be on exhibition 
will be present and the public as well as club 
members are invited to attend, it being the wish 
of the art department to bring the artists and the 
public into closer touch with one another. A 
circuit of this exhibition has been arranged so 
(Continued on Page 34) 




Tiding iri,od£| 

,'cDIIl|)ld2! 

■One o'CloclcjJaturda^" 



J-^*r5JV-TV,i*>-«;-f;J*?>' 



•r>««4 



Page 16 



The CLUBWOMAN 



SOUTHERN DISTRICT CALIFORNIA FEDERATION OF 
BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL WOMEN'S CLUBS 



By Sue Brobst, President 



The Southern District California Federation 
of Business and Professional Women's Clubs is 
the outcome of the Los Angeles County Federa- 
tion of Business and Professional Womens' Clubs. 
Instead of one county, it now takes in ten coun- 
ties, San Diego, Imperial, Orange, Los Angeles, 
San Bernardino, Riverside, Ventura, Santa Bar- 
bara, Mono and Inyo. 

There are forty-one clubs in this district, thirty 
of whith are in Los Angeles County and nine- 
teen in the city of Los Angeles. 

The principal program for the year adopted 
at the first executive board meeting last Septem- 
ber, was to hold the monthly executive board 
meetings throughout the ten counties, with the 
club of that town as hostess club. The executive 
board meeting is held the second Saturday of 
each month and is an open meeting to any fed- 
erated club member. The hostess club gives a 
dinner and evening program. 

The October meeting was held in the Chafiey 
Union High School, Ontario, the Upland and 
Ontario clubs acting as hostesses. The dinner 
was prepared and served by the students of the 
Chaffey Home Economics Department. There 
were some two hundred members at this dinner 
meeting with one lone man — an editor of one 
of the papers. 

The November meeting was held in Glendale 
in the Tuesday Afternoon Club House. The 
hostess club, Glendale Business and Professional 
Women's Club. The dinner was prepared and 
served by some of the members of the Tuesday 
Afternoon Club. There were some two hundred 
members at this dinner meeting with one lone 
man — a well known singer. 

The December meeting will be at the Business 
Women's Club House, 1458 Alvarado Terrace, 
Los Angeles. The schedule, starting with Janu- 
ary is as follo^vs : 

January, Orange; February, San Diego; 
March, Covina; April, Long Beach; May, Ox- 



"Decidedly Different" 



Now Open 



rhe ^reen Tea ?^ot 

Hotel Green 
(All Year) Pasadena, Calif. 

Table d' Hote Luncheons, 60c to 75c 
Table d' Hote Dinners, $1.00 to $1.50. 
Also Service a la Carte. 

Direction Chas. B. Hervey 

"Nowadays in San Diego, It's the Maryland" 



Anaheim — District Convention ; 
Business and Professional Wom- 



nard ; June, 
Hostess Club, 
en's Club. 

Club life is new to the majority of business 
women, and consequently we have many things 
to learn, but the spirit of co-operation and good 
fellowship is strong and will carry us over the 
rough places. The educational opportunities are 
very promising. On the executive board, as offi- 
cers and departmental heads, are lawyers, 
teachers, librarian, advertising women, doctor, 
commercial and corporation secretaries, etc. 

Our publicity chairman has launched a publica- 
tion, called the Southern Sun, for the benefit of 
the clubs and district board. Already monthly 
conferences are being held by the Public Welfare 
chairman, the parliamentarian and press chair- 
man. These conferences are being attended by 
members from the forty-one clubs. 

The State Convention of the California Fed- 
eration of Business and Professional Women's 
Club will be held next September in Hollywood. 
The Velada Club is the hostess club. 

There are two other districts in the State ; 
Northern and Central. 




Women who have men folks to 
shop for, will find our wonder- 
ful new store a most attractive 
and helpful shopping center. 
There are hundreds of gift sug- 
gestions here — for men, women 
and boys. 

"For Your Own Sake 
Please Shop Early" 



Harris &- Frank 

STEIN BIOCH SMART CLOTHES 

635-39 South Hill 



VISIT OUR NEW WOMEN'S SPORTS WEAR SHOP 



DECEMBER, 1925 



Page 17 



THE WOMEN'S UNIVERSITY CLUB 

By Iva B. Duer, Press Chairman 



Officers and Directors for the ensuing year 
are: President, Mrs. Laurence L. Larrabee; first 
vice-president, Mrs. George Curtis De Garmo; 
second vice-president. Miss Katherine Carr; third 
vice-president, Mrs. G. F. Olsen ; treasurer, Mrs. 
Thomas F. Cooke ; recording secretary. Miss 
Helen L. Westbrook ; corresponding secretary, 
Mrs. Rebecca F. Boughton; Directors, Miss 
Anne Mumford, Mrs. Birney Donnell, Mrs. 
Charles F. Turner, Mrs. Norman Pabst ; execu- 
tive secretary, Miss Jane Spalding. 

Committee Chairmen are : Affiliation, Miss 
Helen Moore; benefit, Mrs. Charles F. Turner; 
door, Miss Katherine Acer; finance, Mrs. George 
C. DeGarmo; hospitality. Miss Florence M. 
Bischoflt ; house, Mrs. Palmer H. Cook ; member- 
ship, Mrs. George F. Olsen ; program. Miss 
Katherine Carr; printing, Miss Adelaide D. 
Hovey; publicity, Mrs. A. M. March; public 
affairs, Mrs. M. W. Graham; scholarship, Mrs. 
Joseph Sniffen. 

The dream of making the Women's Univer- 
sity Club house at 943 South Hoover St. a larger 
home center is being happily realized. From all 
sides come expressions of love for the home, of 
appreciation for the art exhibit — this month por- 



traits by Mr. John Hubble Rich and of sur- 
prised pleasure in the festive November decora- 
tions of cotoneaster pannosa. 

The recommendation of Miss Katherine Carr 
that there be four monthly meetings with pro- 
grams is being carried out. The meetings are : 
a Saturday luncheon, a Tuesday luncheon, a 
Thursday dinner and a Sunday tea. If numbers 
in attendance and expressions of interest and 
pleasure signify, all are proving an unqualified 
success. 

Miss Frieda Peycke, the popular Los Angeles 
raconteur, entertained the club at the Saturday 
luncheon in October. At the November lunch- 
eon Lady Adams, who h<-is been making an ex- 
tensive round-the-world trip spoke upon the sub- 
ject — "Women of New Zealand." She charmed 
the club by her personality and speaking out of 
the heart of a woman into the hearts of women 
completely won them. 

Madeline Ververka, speaking upon the sub- 
ject "Your Child and Mine" and the inimitable 
Alma Whitaker, speaking in lighter vein upon the 
subject "Should Men be Educated" were the 
Thursday dinner guests in October and Novem- 
ber. A goodly number of husbands were guests 



To the Club Woman— 

At this, the merry Yuletide season, 
the officers, directors and employees of this 
organization join in wishing you — 

"^ealtl), ^appinejisi anb ^rosiperttp 
burins 1926!" 

Service with Courtesy 

Southern Counties Gas Company 

Public Service in Sixty-Two Southern California Cities 



Page 18 



The CLUBWOMAN 




"Mountain Heights and Beyond" by fVilliam ffendt 



at the dinners. Such interesting and delightful 
after dinner speakers will assure their presence 
in the future. 

Dr. Mary Sinclair Crawford, the new Dean 
of Women at the University of Southern Cali- 
fornia, spoke at the Tuesday luncheon, October 
20, upon the subject "The Point of View." 



A reception and dinner were given in honor 
of Dr. Lois Meek, National Educational Chair- 
man of the A. A. U. W. on Tuesday, November 
17. Dr. Meek comes from New York for a 
week in California. She addressed the club for 
an hour before the dinner and held a conference 
with leading educators of the city. Dr. Meek's 



TRUSTWORTHY FIRMS 



It is with pleasure that THE CLUBWOMAN recommends to the patronage of mem- 
bers of women's clubs the Nurseries and Florists whose announcements appear on this page. 



NEW BULB CATALOGUE 

for 1924-25 now ready for distribution. It 
is free and a post card or telephone call 
will bring it immediately. 

Morris & Snow Seed Co., Inc. 

Established 1906 

853 So. San Pedro Street 

Telephone Main 3530 

LOS ANGEI.F..S CALIFORNIA 


Howard & Smith 

NURSERYMEN AND LANDSCAPE 
ARCHITECTS 
Phone 877-541 Ninth and Olive Sts. 

Design and Decorating TRinity 
a Specialty 7541 


TUcker 2693 Phones TUcker 5467 

WRIGHT'S 


SEEDS 

Headquarters for Farm and Garden 

Ornamental Plants, Shrubs and Trees 

WINSEL-GIBBS SEED CO. 

The Old Reliable Seed House 

of Los Angeles 

Main Store, 211 S. Main St. 

Phone VAndike 9532 

Nursery Yard Forty-ninth and Main 


Flower Shop Fourth St. 
224 West Fourth St. Los Angeles, Cat. 



interest at this time is centered upon child study 
classes for parents. She has made available an 
invaluable bibliography upon the subject as well 
as extensive outlines and plans for the extension 
of the work. 

Brilliant musical programs were given at the 
president's teas of October 25 and November 22. 
Alexander Kosloff, famous Russian pianist, gave 
the first program and Mme. Lizetta Kalova, bril- 
liant Russian violinist with Kosloff at the piano, 
the second. Both artists more than delighted 
their audience and won many friends. 

Armistice Day, the club joined forty other 
local organizations of both men and women in 
the Friday Morning Club Auditorium for a cele- 
bration. There was also an impromptu dedica- 
tion of the new flag pole on the lawn of the club 
house. At sunset Mrs. A. M. Marsh, to whose 
inspiration the club are indebted for the flag and 
the pole, and Miss Jane Spalding, the executive 
secretary led the Cabrillo Chapter of the D. A. 
R. in simple but impressive dedicatory exercises of 
the flag-pole. 

Two card parties have been given ; one for 
proceeds with which to buy chairs, the other to 
pay for the flag-pole. 

Two new sections have been added, music and 
drama. The music section is under the leader- 
ship of Mrs. B. F. Woodard and the drama sec- 
tion of Miss Mary Coble. At the luncheon of 
the music section in November, the works of 
Homer Grunn and Mrs. Kenyon Robinson were 
programmed. 

At the International Round Table under the 
leadership of Miss Lloy Galpin the live ques- 
tions of the day are being discussed. At the Lit- 
erature Section meeting November 24 the works 
and life of Auza Yezierska were reviewed. 

The West Washington and the Hollywood 
Beverly Hills sections are both planning a year 
of increased activity. 



WOMAN'S CLUB OF 
HAWTHORNE 

Mrs. Leah Bratton, Press Chairman 
The Woman's Club of Hawthorne has given birth 
to two new infants, "Music and Legislation." 

The Legislation Section was organized October 2, 
1925. Mrs. E. H. Augustus, Chairman and Mrs. J. M. 
Gilliland, Secretary. The object of this section is to 
study law and the bills that go before the legislature. 
The Music Section was organized October 13, 
1925 with Mrs. Lee Miller, Chairman; Mrs. Ruth 
Clark, Vice Chairman and Mrs. J. A. Hartzell, Sec- 
retary and Treasurer. 

Greater activity has been shown by the Program 
Committee attending district Federation Conferences 
this year than ever before in the history of the 
Woman's Club of Hawthorne. The committee is as 
follows: Mrs. J. F. Hawkins, Chairman; Mrs. Delia 
Dix, Social Service Section ; Mrs. M. Hemenway, Jr., 
Auxiliary; Mrs. J. A. Dunaway, Education; Mrs. E. 
H. Augustus, Legislation; Mrs. R. M. Gregg, Con- 
servation; Mrs. F. Hennes, American Citizenship; 
Mrs. Daisy Kelly, American Homes ; Mrs. Lee F. 
Miller, Music; Mrs. J. R. Holland, Community Serv- 
ice; Mrs. A. F. Hartzel, Child Welfare; Mrs. Belle 
Carter, Literature, and Mrs. Aaron West, California 
History and Landmarks. 




A soap of gentle refine- 
ment for all personal uses. 

A complexion soap that 
will aid you to retain the 
bloom of youth — the 
charm of natural beauty. 

Refresh your skin night 
and morning with a bath 
in Mission Bell. 

Los Angeles Soap Co. 



^^5^5!^ 



MISSION BELL 
SOAP 

Torf/ie compleKiot) 



^^ 



Page 20 



The CLUBWOMAN 





ia'.» 1 








■«« 



"Les Contrabandiers," by Geo. Elmer Broivne 



With 3C 

You can Overcome The 

Handicaps To Skin and Hair 

of the Hard Alkali Water in 

This Country. 

3C is the Modern, Conven- 
ient City Equivalent To 
Putting Out a tVash Tub To 
Catch Rain Water For a 
Shampoo. 







COMFORT 



Also Means 

CLEANLINESS 



You Can Buy 3C At These 

Places— 

LOS ANGELES 

A. & O. 

Broadway Department Store 

The May Co. 

HOLLYWOOD 

Carty Bros. 

FLINTRIDGE 

Flintridge Grocery Co. 

BEVERLY HILLS 

R. P. O'Connor 

PASADENA 

F. C. Nash Co. 

The Model Grocery 

LONG BEACH 

The Wall Co. 

RIVERSIDE 

C. F. Elder 

Alfred M. Lewis 

Sweet Grocery Co, 



CHARM 

the East can no longer 



If you will use 3C in the water whenever you wash, your friends from 
This water is dreadfully hard on your skin, isn't it, my dear?" 
It is a perfect water softener and can be used with your favorite soap for bath or shampoo. 
A little in a glass of water absolutely cleans your rings. 

You Can Buy 3C At These Places 



SAN BERNARDINO 

McNeil's Grocery 

Golden Rule 

Bates Grocery 

ARCADIA 

Shular Bros. 



MONTROSE 
Hoffman-Fowler 

MONROVIA 
Kellar Grocery Co. 

SIERRA MADRE 
T. Salury 



ALTADENA 
Altadena Grocery Store 

TORRENCE 
Paige's 

WATTS 
G. J. Burger 



MONETA 

R. W. Ahlberg 

GLENDALE 

All Grocery Stores 

COLTON 

Magills 

Burton-Powell Co. 



DECEMBER, 1925 



Page 21 



PASADENA SHAKESPEARE 
CLUB 

By Mrs. Harry Coleman, Press Chairman 

A great deal of interest has been centered in 
the production of Mrs. Louise Taylor Gerdine's 
one act play, "Uncle Sam's Workshop" given at 
the Shakespeare club house in Pasadena by mem- 
bers of the club. A great audience which over- 
flowed into the aisles and doorways testified to 
this interest not only because Mrs. Gerdine is a 
member of this club but because her play was 
the prize winning play in the State Federation 
of Women's Clubs' competition and had the 
honor of being produced at the state meeting 
held in Santa Cruz last May. The play shows 
in detail the kind of citizens w^ho make up the 
family of Uncle Sam from the careless "Mrs. 
Never-Thought-of-That" to the eager helpful- 
ness of the states who come bearing gifts. The 
cast was made up as follows: 

The prologue, Alexander Hamilton, H. G. 
Lonsdale ; Uncle Sam, Edward Murphy ; Colum- 
bia, Mrs. Lewis H. Turner; Public Opinion, 
Philip Gerdine ; Mrs. Never-Thought-of-That, 
Mrs. Dana Braislin ; Red Tape, Luanne Bart- 
lett'; Boy, Elizabeth Sheehan ; Girl, Helen Mc- 
Masters ; California, Mrs. James W. Morin ; 
Delaware, Mrs. Charles H. Rodi; Arizona, 
Eleanor Gerdine ; Texas, Mrs. F. A. H. Fysh ; 
Rhode Island, Mrs. Stella Quackenbos. 

Mrs. Gerdine was called to the footlights at 
the close of the play and amid enthusiastic ap- 
plause was presented with a huge basket of 
flowers by Mrs. Edwin H. Hahn, president of 
the club. 

The music of the Shakespeare Club is this 
year under the direction of Miss Margaret Goetz 
of Los Angeles. Miss Goetz is proving an in- 
spiration with her rich and varied interpretation 
of programs. Just now she is concentrating on 
the folk songs of the Scandinavian countries. 
The assisting artists appear in the costumes of 
the countries. 

Members of the Shakespeare Club of Pasadena 




The Vogue 
of Italian Linens 



is reflected in the importations at the exquisite 
shop of 

Eleanor and Hollingsworth Beach 

630 E. Colorado St., Pasadena 
Luncheon Sets, Tray Cloths, Bridge Sets, Mis- 
cellaneous Pieces, Majolica Tableware. 




SA1£, 

our MOVE 

nearer 

our\^ALUES 

more 
amazing 
— your CHANCE 

more 
insistent 

M^m0^ /ft 

BARKER 
BROS.^ - - 

BROADWAY Ictmcn y^^v- 




Page 22 



The CLUBWOMAN 



Directory of California Products 

For the convenience of the seventy thousand clubwomen of California and the many others 
who have enthusiastically subscribed to the campaign of the women's clubs to promote in every pos- 
sible way the use by Californians of California products. The Clubwoman, mouthpiece of the cam- 
paign, presents the following partial classified list of Classified products. In planning their shop- 
ping, clubwomen will find this list handy reference guide to what to order in carrying out their 
pledge to buy Califronia-made goods wherever possible. 

Olson's Bread, "O So Good" — Olson Bak- 
ing Co., Los Angeles. 



AWNINGS 
and Awning Co. — Canopies. 



Acme Tent 

4069 Mission Road, Los Angeles. Tele- 
phone CApitol 7380. 

BUILDING MATERIALS 
Doors-Sash-Screens — ^Veneered Doors, High 
Grade Interior Finish — Pacific Door & 
Sash Co. 
Hardwood Floor Finishers and Contractors 

— National Floor Co., Los Angeles. 
Mirrors, Sand, Plaster, Vitrolite — Raphael 

Glass Co., Los Angeles. 
Pioneer Paper Co., Manufacturers of Roof- 
ings. 
3ash-Doors-Hardwoods-Hardw^are — Frank 
I Graves Sash, Door and Mill Co. 

I CLOTHING 

ti'Bentsknit," "Ribstitched," Bathing Suits 

;, and Sweaters — Pacific Knitting Mills, Los 

' Angeles. 

"Summers Quality" outing and work cloth- 
ing for men and boys Summers Mfg. 

Co., Inc. 

CARPET CLEANING 

City Steam Carpet Cleaning Works, John 
Bloeser, Main 0430. New Rugs. 
FOODS 

Biscuits, crackers, etc. — Pacific Coast Bis- 
cuit Co., Los Angeles. 

Capitol Products, flour, etc. — Capitol Mill- 
ing Co., Los Angeles. 

Carson-Baruch Baking Co., Inc., Wholesale 
Bakers, 3545 Pasadena Ave., Los Ange- 
les. Capitol 5770. 

Christopher Co., L. J. — Quality Ice Cream 
and Candies. 

Faultless Bread — "Let your daily bread be 
Faultless." Faultless Bread Bakery, Los 
Angeles. 

Globe "Al" Flour, Macaroni Products and 
Cereals — Globe Grain and Milling Co., 
Los Angeles. 

Iris Brand "Over 200 Wonderful Things to 
Eat" — Distributed by Haas, Baruch & 
Co., Los Angeles. 

Morola — Nut Margarine, Morris & Co., Los 
Angeles. 

Newmark's Pure High Grade Coffee — 
FAMOUS FOR FLAVOR. 



Puritas Vacuum-packed Coffee — a Los An- 
geles product, at most grocers. 

Miss Saylor's, Inc., Unusual Chocolates, 
6752 Venice Blvd., Culver City. 

FURNITURE AND HOUSE FITTINGS 
Barker Bros., 716-738 South Broadway — 
Complete Furnishers of Successful Homes 
— Our "Own Make" and "Mastermade" 
Upholstered Furniture and Hand-tailored, 
"individualized" Mattresses and Box 
Springs. 
Inglewood Furniture — Inglewood Manufac- 
turing Co., Inglewood, Cal. 

Kling Furniture — Kling Manufacturing Co., 

Los Angeles. 
Kwality Pillows, etc. — Kwality Feather Co., 
Los Angeles. 

Los Angeles Can Co. — Manufacturers of 
Tin Cans for all purposes. 
Sanotuf Mattress, furniture — Roberti Bros., 

Los Angeles. 
Stockwell Neverstretch Mattress — L. W. 

Stockwell Co., Los Angeles. 
Upholstered Furniture — Soronow's Furni- 
ture Manufacturing Co., Los Angeles. 
Window Shades — Window Shade Products 
Company, 9 I East Fourth St., Los An- 
geles. 
"Zenith" Upholstered Furniture and Mat- 
tresses — Bailey-Schmitz Co., Los An- 
geles. 
Citizens Independent Ice & Cold Storage 
Co., 61 0-620 South Raymond Ave., Pasa- 
dena, California. Phone Colorado 30. 

GASOLINE AND MOTOR OIL 
Ventura Gasoline "California's Best," Ven- 
tura Motor Oil (Paraffin-Base)- — Ventura 
Refining Co., Los Angeles. 

MOTOR TRUCKS 
Moreland Motor Truck Co., Los Angeles. 

STSORAGE BATTERIES 
Hobbs Storage Batteries, Hobbs Storage 
Battery Corp., Los Angeles. 

WATER HEATERS 
De Luxe and Supreme Gas Water Heaters 
— General Water Heater Corp., 1601 
Compton Ave. 



DECEMBER, 1925 



Page 23 



assisted in the serving of the luncheon for the 
president's council of Los Angeles District held 
at the club house on November 12, thereby add- 
ing $16 to the building fund. 

The club is co-operating with the Civic League 
and the Council of International Relations in 
bringing speakers on various topics of interna- 
tional interest for a series of evening meetings. 
Dr. Robert Freeman, who has returned from a 
recent trip abroad, was the first speaker and 
spoke on Some Recent Phases of International 
Relations. Chester H. Rowell, who spoke on the 
World Court, was the second speaker. 

Mrs. Clara Bryant Heywood, who has been 
a member of the executive board of the club for 
the past few years and the present chairman of 
International Relations, is leaving for a well 
earned rest and will enjoy a trip around the 
world. 



enunciation: The latter quality he owes very 
largely to his long experience on the stage. As 
a speaker his diction is perfect, while his read- 
ings of his own verse are distinguished by drama- 
tic power of the highest type. 



JOHN DRINKWATER, FAMOUS 
ENGLISH WRITER TO SPEAK 

John Drinkwater, the well known English 
poet, dramatist and essayist, who is now mak- 
ing his third American lecture tour, is to visit 
Los Angeles under the management of L. E. 
Behymer opening at the Ebell Auditorium, 1719 
South Figueroa Street on Monday evening, Jan- 
uary 4th on "Abraham Lincoln" and on Wednes- 
day evening, January 6th on "Poetry and Life" 
and "The Nature of Drama." 

Since his first visit to this country about five 
years ago, Mr. Drinkwater has earned a bril- 
liant reputation as a lecturer and wherever he 
is booked to speak he invariably attracts large 
and enthusiastic audiences. He is unique among 
English authors from the fact that he is recog- 
nized as one of the foremost authorities on Lin- 
coln and the Civil War Period. It was be- 
cause of his profound study of the great presi- 
dent and his contemporaries that he was led to 
write his remarkable play, "Abraham Lincoln," 
which met with such phenomenal success when 
it was produced in London and New York. 

Of the second talk on "Poetry and Life" the 
London Daily Mail comments: "Too many of 
our poets today seem to write for each other and 
not for readers at large. Mr. John Drinkwater 
is different. His themes are homely and of 
universal interest, and he pays his readers the 
compliment of never writing unless he has some- 
thing to say. He does not say it at too great 
length either ; his thoughts are compacted, and 
his verse thereby gains greatly in vigor and dis- 
tinction." 

Mr. Drinkwater, on his present tour, is de- 
lighting large audiences with his lecture on 
Lincoln and his talks on poetry and the drama, 
and invariably surprises his hearers by his free- 
dom from English mannerisms and his clear 



HIGHLAND PARK EBELL 
CLUB 

By Mrs. George F. Cook, Press Chairman 

Among speakers of recent date at Highland 
Park Ebell Club were Dr. Walter F. Dexter, 
president of Whittier College, on "The Control 
of Human Conduct" ; Everett R. Perry, Los An- 
geles City Librarian, on "The New Library"; 
Gordon Whitnall, director of the Los Angeles 
City Planning Commission, on "The Commer- 
cial Value of Civic Beauty" ; George A. Damon, 
secretary of the City Planning Association, on 
"Regional Planning; Jess E. Stephens, Los An- 
geles City Attorney, on "The New Charter" and 
Dr. Carl S. Patton, pastor of the First Congre- 
gational Church of Los Angeles, on "The 
Woman Citizen." 

Mrs. John H. Foley, chairman of Public Af- 
fairs, made a delightful toastmistress at the an- 
nual club breakfast in October, her theme being 
the spirit of club and home influence. Assisting 
her in the program were the president, Mrs. Her- 
bert Carr ; the Literature chairman, Mrs. Dan 
Hammack; Philanthropy chairman, Mrs. George 
E. Paine; Civic Beautv chairman, Mrs. Harry 
Louis Stroh; Child Welfare, Mrs. Harry E. 
Lawrence and Mrs. Charles Oden with soprano 
solos. An original song, a "Toast to the Club 
and the New President," words and music by 
Mrs. Olive Belle Mier, was beautifully sung by 
Mrs. Lewellyn C. Hall, soprano. 

A recital by representatives of the club proved 
very attractive. Mrs. Charles Oden, soprano, 
sang a group of songs accompanied at the piano 
by Mrs. A. Louis Nickerson. Miss Carlisle 
Tupper, pupil of Maurice Browne added to the 
excellence of the program with a difficult reading, 
"Dust of the Road," followed by a varied selec- 
tion showing Miss Tupper's versatility. 

Miss Irmalee Campbell, operatic soprano and 
Charles King, dramatic tenor, accompanied by 
Miss Margaret Wilson, rendered solos and duets 
at a November meeting and another November 
program of great enjoyment was that of Miss 
Anne Kavanaugh, well-know|i reader, of whom 
it may be said, "she is in a class by herself." Miss 
Sherdena Aston, talented member of the Los An- 
geles Woman's Symphony Orchestra, played 
several selections on the marimba. Beside a diffi- 
cult Russian composition, Miss Aston played 
two familiar songs specially arranged for the 
marimba by herself. 

In the sections have been interesting speakers 
and discussions. During the absence of Miss 



Page 24 



The CLUBWOMAN 



Winnifred Rouzee, leader of the Bible section, 
who was delivering Bible lectures in the east, Dr. 
John Maclnnes spoke before a large gathering on 
"The Bible and American Ideals." Mrs. M. D. 
Howard is the curator of the section. 

After the monthly luncheon in November, 
Mrs. Dan Hammack, curator of the Literary 
section gave an interesting review of the works 
of E. Barrington and L. Adams Beck. 

"The Constitution" and "Federal State and 
Local Governments" have been discussed at the 
American Citizenship meetings, Mrs. Clarence 
Shults, curator. 

Mrs. K. W. Snell, curator of the Drama sec- 
tion, read Lee Wilson Dodd's comedy, "The 
Changelings," at the October meeting and Anne 
Virginia Snowden, director of the Laboratory 
Players read Percy MacKaye's, "This Fine, 
Pretty World," at the November meeting. In- 
strumental tone, color and nationality were dis- 
cussed at the Music section by the curator, Mrs. 
Harry E. Fisher. Introduction to business and 
the motion to amend were studied at the Parlia- 
mentary Law section, Mrs. Charles S. McKelvey, 
leader and Mrs. I. F. Dillman, curator. Cariol- 
amis is being read at the Shakespeare section, 
Mrs. C. W. Foote, curator. The Rambler sec- 
tion reorganized for the year at a picnic luncheon 
in the Arroyo, the guests of Mrs. William L. 
Judson, who conducted them through Mr. Jud- 
son's art gallery and also through the Judson 



Art Glass Studio, a special treat. Mr. Judson is 
one of the leading artists of Southern California. 
On November 18, the Ramblers enjoyed a day at 
Alhambra Park. The members of this section 
made their annual Thanksgiving visit to South- 
ern California Home for Aged Women, taking 
with them a donation of canned fruit and jelly. 
A delightful program of readings and music was 
presented and ice cream and home-made cake 
were served to the members of the home. Mrs. 
S. W. Hastings is curator of thfe section, assisted 
by Mrs. E. B. Machin. 

A reception for new members was well 
attended and Mrs. E. M. Kromer, social chair- 
man and her committee were hostesses. A psy- 
chological contest game absorbed those who were 
not engaged in playing cards or in plying their 
needles for the coming bazaars and the holiday 
season. Prizes were given for successful contes- 
tants and refreshments were added to the after- 
noon's pleasure. 

Another successful social affair was the card 
party held Friday evening, November 29, with 
Mrs. William O. Bird and Mrs. Elmer E. John- 
son, chairmen. 

Through the chairman of Art, Mrs. William 
L. Judson, during the month of October, an ex- 
hibit of Mrs. Nell Brooker Mayhew's paintings 
was enjoyed and through November, there was 
an exhibit of William L. Judson's paintings. 





Ebell Club Auditorium 1719 S. Figueroa 

L. E. Behymer presents by arrangement with 

Lee Keedick of New York, England's brilliant Dramatist, Poet and Essayist 

JOHN DRINKWATER 






Eve. Jan. 4: 

"Abraham Lincoln" 




Jan. 6: 

"Poetry, Life, Drama" 






Tickets $1, $1.50, $2, plus 10% tax on sale Parker and Jones Book Stores, and 
Central Box office, Auditorium Lobby, 5th at Olive Sts. 





The Way to Keep California 

Prosperous Is to Buy 

Its Products 



WHEN YOU NEED A BATTERY 
ASK FOR A HOBBS 



Hobbs Storage Battery Corp. 

2019 Bay St. Los Angeles 



Mount Lowe 

Tavern and Cottages 

YEAR 'ROUND RESORT 
DELIGHTFUL AT ALL SEASONS 

Two-Hour Scenic Trip from Los Angeles 
Five Trains Daily at Convenient Hours 

Write for Descriptive Folder 

PACIFIC ELECTRIC RAILWAY 

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 



DECEMBER, 1925 



Page 25 



SOUTH SIDE EBELL CLUB 

By Edna Grace Cooke, Sub-Press Chairman 
November, coming as it does shortly after the 
fall opening and yet before the Christmas holi- 
day, seems to be the favorite month for bazaars. 
South Side Ebell, following the usual custom 
and not to be outdone by her sister clubs, held 
her bazaar on the 12th, 13th and 14th of the 
month. It has often been said that if you attend 
one bazaar you have seen them all, for bazaars 
like circuses cannot change their form or add to 
their attractiveness, but Lilly Peterson and her 
committee made such strenuous efforts to elimi- 
nate this very element, that those attending were 
forced to admit that there is virtue in bazaars 
after all. But the main object for which the 
bazaar was given — to add dollars to our build- 
ing fund, was accomplished to that extent, that 
many a brick was added so to speak, and the time 
of consummation so shortened, that our new 
home can almost said to be taking form. 

Though the South Side Ebell Club is one of 
those clubs which are unfortunate in not having 
a program budget ; her speakers and entertaining 
artists, have been the envy of those clubs, which 
like South Side have to draw on friends and 
friends friends for material. No meeting this 
month but has seen a speaker of real merit on 
some well worth-while subject come before the 
club. And as for entertaining artists, too much 
praise cannot be bestowed upon them. Leola 



YOU CAN SLEEP SAFELY ON 

KWALITY PILLOWS 

THEY ARE MADE OF 

ALL NEW FEATHERS 

Thoroughly sterilized by our own process. 

INSIST ON 

KWALITY PILLOWS 

Made in Los Angeles 




'No dress complete 

without the Elite" 

CLOTH BUTTONS 
EMBROIDERY 
PLE.AT1NG 
HEMSTITCHING 
BEADING 



Elite Button Co. 

603 Title Guarantee 

Bldg. 

220 West 5th Street 

Los Angeles 

Prompt attention to 

mail orders. 

Please mention Clubwoman, 



McDowell Hermmann, whistler, who came be- 
fore the club on November 5, is an entertainer 
who in her own particular line cannot be sur- 
passed. On November 12 some twenty artists 
pupils, from the Hortense Williams School of 
Dancing, gave a half-hour program of esthetic 
dances. Dance after dance of sheer beauty fol- 
lowed one after the other, until the program was 
climaxed with an exceedingly beautiful ensemble 
number. Clyde H. Cooke, tenor, an artist who 
is well and favorably known to South Side audi- 
ences, entertained on the 19th Mnth a group of 
modern, as well as old time classical numbers. 

November 26, the day of our National Thanks- 
giving, the club followed its usual custom and 
held no meeting at that time. 



SAUGUS COMMUNITY CLUB 

By Mrs. Nina B, Wright, Press Chairman 
In a quiet and unpretentious way, the Saugus 
Community Club is doing a little each month. 
Last month a fraction over an acre of ground 
was bought and our club treasury was painfully 
lowered ; but the mere surmising that upon that 
acre of ground a club building would sometime 
cast a shadow is spurring the members to greater 
activity to replenish the club's money chest, and 
plan for a future home. The dances that are 
frequently given are generously patronized, in 
fact everything sponsored by the club meets with 
the community's hearty approval. 



we- 



destroy 
moths 



in clothing — in uphostering — 
pianos — rugs, by our excusive 
scientific fumigation process in 
the Plymetl "Air-Tite" vaults. 
Phone WEstmore 4141. 

1335 So. Figueroa St. 
Sth and Alameda Sts. 
Los Angeles 




Los Angeles 



San Francisco 



Oakland 



Fresno 



Page 26 



The CLUBWOMAN 




Group of N on-Commissioned Officers of the San Diego Army and Navy Academy, 
Taken in Front of the Exposition Buildings, Balboa Park, San Diego, California. 



SCHOOL NOTES 

Miss Jeanne Parsons and Miss Grace Den- 
nen and the faculty of Girls' Collegiate School 
have issued invitations for a housewarming, to 
be held at their beautiful new home in the Glen- 
dora Foothills overlooking the San Gabriel Val- 
ley, on Wednesday, December the second, from 
two until six o'clock. Friends wishing to motor 
out from Los Angeles, take Huntington Drive 
and Foothill Boulevard through Azusa to the 
Citrus Union High School, and then follow the 
Girls' Collegiate signs. All members of the 
alumnae are cordially invited without further 
notice. Should the day prove rainy, it will be 
held the following day. 

* * * 

Seniors of Westlake School for Girls enter- 
tained the freshmen recently with an informal 



tea. The freshmen were "brought to trial" by 
the seniors as part of the entertainment, much 
to the amusement of all. Miss Pepi Lederer 
has been chosen captain of the senior basketball 
team and Miss Helen Campbell, captain of the 
junior team. A most interesting contest was 
held November 23, with Miss Frances Murison 
as coach. Thirty students of the school have 
enrolled for the golf classes under Mr. Roy 
Tufts, well known instructor. 



TO OUR PRESS CHAIRMEN 



Artieles not appearing in November issue 
of the Clubwoman, are being held for our next 
issue because of lack of space. 



CAROLINE DUNCAN 

Studio Open October I 
Classes in Public Speaking and all forms of 

Dramatic Art. 
1622 Crenshaw Boulevard EMpire 6360 



WESTLAKE SCHOOL 

FOR GIRLS 

Resident and Day School 
333 S. Westmoreland Ave. Los Angeles 



SECRETARIAL 
COACHING 

For cultured people desiring personal attention. 
Refined, harmonious surroundings. All Secretarial 
subjects. Enter at any time. Management, Mrs. 
Frank Rutherford. 711 S. Vermont Ave. Fl 1763. 



KENWOOD HALL 

Resident and day school for girls. Sub-primary 
through High School. Spanish, French, Expres- 
sion. Dancing included in regular tuition. 675 
S. Vermont Ave., Los Angeles. WAshington 1612. 



DECEMBER, 1925 



Page 27 



SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 

As a result of personal inquiry The Clubwoman takes pleasure' in commending to California 
clubwomen the schools whose announcements appear in The Clubwoman. 



NEWLY LOCATED IN GLENDORA 
FOOTHILLS 

(§trl£i' CoUesiate ^cfjool 

Day and Boarding School 
Thirty-fourth year. Accredited E^st and 
West. New Buildings. Miss Parsons and 
Miss Dennen, Principals. Tel. Glendora 

44783. City office "Ask Mr. Foster." 

Information Service Robinson's Dept. 

Store, 7th St. and Grand Ave. Tel. BR. 
4701. 

Cumnock ^ctjool 

Thirty-First Year 
School of Expression. Academy, Junior School 

Complete courses in 
Vocal Interpretation of Art 

Literature Public Speaking 

Literary Appreciation Journalism 

Story-Telling Story Writing 

Voice and Diction Dramatic Art 

Aesthetic Dancing 

HELEN A. BROOKS, Director 
53 53 West Third Street 
GRanite 3253 
GRanite 3353 Los Angeles 



University of Southern California 

Bulletins with full description of 

courses on application 

Address Registrar 

University of Southern California 
35th and University Ave. Los Angeles 



ELLIOTT SCHOOL 

FOR GIRLS 

Residence and Day School. Sub-Primary 
through Eleventh Grade. Ideal Home 
Life. Character Building. Superior Edu- 
cational Advantages. Out-Door Classes. 
MARTHA COLLINS WEAVER, Principal, 
Gramercy Place at Pico Blvd., Los Angeles 



"The Coming West Point of the West" 

San Diego Army & Navy 
Academy 

The Academy enjoys the highest Scholastic rat- 
ing of the Univ. of Calif. — "Division A." It is 
under Government supervision. It emphasizes 
Christian Character Training- Address for infor- 
mation Col. Thos. A. Davis, Pres. Pacific Beach, 
Calif. 



iHIarl&orougi) ^cfjool for <@irl£e 

5029 W. 3rd St. Los Angeles 

Boarding and Day School 

Accredited to Eastern and Western 

Colleges 

36th Term— 1925. 
Ada S. Blake. A. B.. Principal 



PAGE MILITARY ACADEMY 

A BIG SCHOOL FOB LITTLE BOYS 

The largest of Its class In America. Everything adapted 
to meet the needs of the smaller boj. Five fireproof 
buildings; aefen-acre campus; seventeen resident teachers. 
Here a boy Is taught self -reliance. Through military 
training he acquires habits of exactness, the spirit of 
team work and co-operation and also energy and inltlB' 
tlve — the best preparation for life, no matter what pro- 
fession he may follow. Let our Catalogue tell you all 
about our school. 

ROBERT A. GIBBS, Headmaster 

1257 Cochran Avenue 

EMplre 9103. LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



URBAN 

Military Academy 

The Great Outdoor School 

for the building of Body and Brain and Character 
with Sports and Pastimes. Under Matchless Con- 
ditions. Address the Secretary, Miss Keller, 637 
Wilcox Ave., Los Angeles. 



Pacific Military Academy 

Washington Blvd., Culver City 

Boarding and Day School. Beautiful new Italian 
Renaissance type buildings. Excellent Faculty. 
Out-door Classes. All athletics, swimming, gym- 
nasium, horseback riding and music. Enter any 
time in Grammar or High School. Enroll now for 
Fall Term. References required. For catalogue 
write Secretary or Phone Culver City 3294. 



The Greenwood School 

FOR GIRLS 

Select Resident and Day School. Limited Num- 
ber. In Session All Year. Principals: Mrs. M. 
Greenwood (Newnham College, Cambridge), Mr. 
H. F. Greenwood, B.A. (Corpus Christi College, 
Cambridge) . 5928 Franklin Avenue, Hollywood. 



Page 28 



The CLUBWOMAN 



WOMEN'S AUXILIARY, RAIL- 
WAY MAIL ASSOCIATION 

By Mrs. M. I. Clemmer, Press Chairman 

Co-operation is the word that spelled success 
for the annual bazaar held in October by the 
Women's Auxiliary of the Railway Mail Associa- 
tion. The donations were numerous and lovely 
and how the ladies did "shell out" under the 
persuasive auctioneering of Mrs. Donald Mac- 
Donald and others. 

A well-attended luuncheon at Serrano Inn 
November 16 justified the conclusion that this 
same group of women, while still laboring under 
stress of the Community Chest Drive, will put 
over with equal enthusiasm a Christmas party 
outlined to include the children of the Goodwill 
Nursery. 

Mrs. A. A. Hummel was the luncheon speaker, 
her subject being "The Fault of the Home from 
a Youthful Viewpoint." Her remarks were 
convincing and borne out by the candid written 
opinion of 141 senior high school students. 

Three musical numbers were rendered by Miss 
Lois Miller and Miss Daisy Sinclair of the John 
Smallman Studio. These selections were highly 
appreciated. 

Our president, Mrs. H. H. Graham, spoke on 
International Relations and International Justice, 
urging the club to adopt the resolution as sent to 
us by the Federation. This was done. 

Meeting of the Executive Board and Childrens 
Party Committee will be held December 7, at 
2 p. m., in the conference room, Bank of Italy, 
Seventh and Olive Streets, Los Angeles. 



THE COLLEGE WOMEN'S 
CLUB OF LONG BEACH 

By Grace E. Iriiin, Press Chairman 
The membership list of the College Women's 
Club of Long Beach continues to grow rapidly, 
thus indicating an organization worth while in 
this community. Thirty-four applicants were 
voted into active membership during the month 
of October and twelve additional names have 
been recently added, bringing the total club 
membership now to 346. The reason for this 
rapid increase in membership is in part due to 
the excellent programs promised by the program 
committee, already announced through the year 
book, and in part due to the enthusiastic boost- 
ing of individual members. 

The general scheme of entertainment planned 
by the committee is classified as follows : First, 
dinner and musical program — The Neblett Con- 



cert Trio; second, lecture — presented on No- 
vember 4, by Sir John Adams, under the caption 
"The Psychology of the Crowd;" third, fun- 
to be presented as Hi-Jinks on December 1 ; 
fourth, critic, — when Sherwood Anderson, on 
January 5, brings his lecture on "America — ^A 
Storehouse of Vitality;" fifth, historical lecture, 
— Major Vivian Gilbert, on February 2, present- 
ing his new lecture, "Both Sides of the Foot- 
lights;" sixth, the unusual, — ^with J. Malcom 
Bird's presentation of "The Present Status of 
Spirit Phenomena," on March 2; and seventh, 
travelogue, — ^Jean Schoen, on "The White Man's 
Grave," April 6. 

The scholarship committee, under Miss Grubb, 
chairman, has announced its first benefit card 
party. With both men and women invited and 
cards and mah jongg offered as entertainment, 
the committee hopes to not only increase their 
loan fund very materially but also to offer the 
College Club members a delightful social even- 
ing. 

As Mrs. O. P. Bell, president of the club, is 
visiting, after a recent illness, at the home of 
her parents in Atlantic, Iowa, the December 
meeting is in the hands of the first vice-president, 
Mrs. Fisher. For this meeting the members are 
grouped according to the location of their alma 
mater, into seven groups and these groups are 
promising varied and original stunts for the meet- 
ing on December 1. After the six o'clock dinner, 
the members will adjourn to the gymnasium of 
the Y. M. C. A. Building and there forget the 
present in the frolics of their college days. 



GALPIN SHAKESPEARE CLUB 

By Mrs. Elizabeth C. Fisher, Press Chairman 

Out of good will to the Community Chest 
cause, the Galpin Shakespeare Club devoted a 
brief time at the opening of its regular November 
meeting, on the Ilth, to hearing the "Chest" 
question presented by Mrs. Saul Morris. She also 
gave any explanations requested, being ably 
seconded by Miss Margaret Phillipson. 

The regular program for the morning was 
devoted to the play of "Hamlet." Of course no 
member of the club imagines that she could say 
anything original about this much-discussed 
drama, which has been sifted through so many 
great minds, but it is possible to collect and com- 
pare the opinions of authoritative critics and liter- 
ary investigators. 

The session was presided over by Mrs. Frederic 
B. West, who spoke of the labor which Shakes- 



Hunter. Do L(N & Co. 

San Francisco Santa Barbara Los Angeles Oakland 

GOVERNMENT, MUNICIPAL. DISTRICT AND CORPORATION BONDS 



San Diego 



DECEMBER, 1925 



Page 29 



peare had given to making this a great play. He 
did, not just scratch it off, but is known to have 
revised it three times, and seems to have reached 
perfection. 

If Hamlet were not a vital work entirely in- 
dependent of "period" costumes and such matters, 
it would almost certainly have been a failure when 
presented, as was rec.ently done in London, in 
modern dress, Ophelia even having her hair 
bobbed, but it was a great success, the terrible 
drama seeming to be just as impressive as ever. 

Mrs. Charles Stavnow gave the date and plot 
of the play. Miss W. E. Elliott following with 
an analysis of the sources of the names of the 
characters. Mrs. W. E. Silverwood read a 
paper written by Mrs. Fred S. Lang in regard to 
the twenty-five Bible references found in the 
drama. Mrs. Robert Robinson treated the 
subject of the supernatural in the play, and com-_ 
pared the "Ghost" with other such appearances 
in the works of Shakespeare. 



"ALL FOR YOU" IN SIXTH WEEK 
AT MASON 

With an entirelv new first act, new songs, and 
dialogue and Nancy Welford added to the cast, 
Thomas Wilkes's musical production "All For 
You," enters on its sixth week at the Mason, 
Sunday night. The consensus of opinion is that 
this show in its rejuvenated form is in for a long 
run at the Mason, as its many features combine 
to make it a strong appeal to lovers of musical 
comedy. It also has the advantage of being the 
only musical comedy in town at the present time. 
Arthur Freed 's two new song hits in the show 
"Pretty Little Raindrops" and "Two is Com- 
pany," as sung by Miss Welford, are going over 
big. Other attractive bits of the show are con- 
tributed by the Ten English Rockets, with their 
sensational unison dancing and Arthur Kay's 
syncopatore in the orchestra pit. The complete 
cast includes William Gaxton, Nancy Welford, 
Madeline Cameron, Ted Doner, Eddie Allen, 
Doe Loretta, Myrna Kennedy, Wilbur Cush- 
man, Dorothy Morrill, Frank Dawson, James 
Edwards and Maurice O'Hern. 



WOMAN'S IMPROVEMENT 
CLUB OF CORONA 

By Lillian J. Lewis, Press Chairman 

The Woman's Improvement Club of Corona held 
its first meeting of the )'ear on October 13 in its 
club home. At 12:30 a luncheon was enjoyed. 

The plans for these luncheons are such that each 
member has a share in the preparations during the 
year, the names being chosen alphabetically. 

A business session followed. Presiding with the 
ease and grace of a veteran, Mrs. Fred E. Snedicor, 
our new president wielded the gavel. 

Mrs. Frary Johnson, head of the Home Economics 
department of the high school presented her plans 
for Americanization work among the little Mexican 
girls as follows: By the erection of partitions in a 
large room in the Washington school, a model home 



has been arranged. These rooms are to be made 
liveable by the work of the children, largely. Mater- 
ials for curtains, rags to be made into braided rugs, 
sheets were solicited and a ready response has al- 
ready been made. 

A musical program was then given by the Fitz- 
gerald Music Co., of Los Angeles, who furnished a 
Knabe Ampico for the occasion, Vera Barstow, violin- 
ist and Margaret Messer Morrs, Soprano, artists gave 
selections. 



SPLENDID FURNITURE AT THE 
CALIFORNIA 

Special December exhibits of fine furniture, 
suitable for gifts, always dear to the household- 
er's heart, are holiday features at the California 
Furniture Company's great Broadway store in 
Los Angeles. 

Particularly noteworthy are two recent win- 
dow displays, one showing a Spanish dining 
suite and the other one in Italian Renaissance 
style. The former consists of some twelve 
pieces of selected American walnut, massively 
hand-carved in beautiful designs. The metal 
work in stretchers and panels is of finely- 
wrought iron. 

The entire window is employed in the setting 
and represents a dining room in a finely-fur- 
nished home. The color scheme is worked out 
in red and old gold in rugs, table throws, wall 
tapestry and upholstery. Illumination is pro- 
vided by candelabra in bronze. 

Equally luxurious and distinctive is the Ital- 
ian dining suite in the opposite window. Like 
the other, the wood employed in this set is 
American walnut, hand-carved but in designs 
more chastely plain than characterizes the Span- 
ish display. The buffet of this set is particularly 
interesting. During December both windows 
will be devoted to lasting holiday gift articles 
of the most desirable types. 



PEERLESS LAUNDRY 

Try Our Famous Rough Dry 



OR 



Complete Finish Department 

For Women's and Children's 
Clothing 



PEERLESS FINISHED 
Shirts and Collars 



LOWEST PRICES CONSISTENT 
With Good Work and Service 

Peerless Laundry 

AXridge 9161 



Page 30 



The CLUBWOMAN 



PIONEER JEWELER IN NEW 
LOCATION IN JANUARY 

Of int?erest to discriminating women and to 
patrons of the arts in general is the announce- 
ment of the forthcoming removal of Harry B. 
Crouch, pioneer Los Angeles jeweler, from his 
long-time location at 222-224 West Ninth Street 
to his commodious studio at 1173 South Hoover 
Street in Januarj', 1926. 

The change is necessitated by the rapid growth 
of Mr. Crouch's business, requiring larger quar- 
ters and better facilities for display. The 
Crouch store has long been noted for its re- 
markable paintings and other works of art, for 
its vast variety of valuable antiques and for the 
hand-made jewelry and special designing of dia- 
monds in which Mr. Crouch specializes. 



in turn, is kept stocked by frequent large pur- 
chases by a single buyer for the entire chain. 
The effect of this is to insure the consumer of 
the freshest possible goods at the lowest prices 
at which the goods can be handled. 

The system not only enables the management 
to buy at lower figures than can any single estab- 
lishment, but further operates to the customer's 
advantage by cutting down overhead. Each 
store is under a branch manager and stafE of 
clerks, but above the managers there is but one 
force of executive in control of the entire chain. 
The large savings thus effected are passed along 
to the patrons of the stores in the form of lower 
prices. 



SAFEWAY STORES PLEASE PUBLIC 
The remarkable growth of the Safeway Stores, 
the largest single chain of grocery establishments 
in the West, is a striking evidence of the popu- 
larity of the organization's methods with Cali- 
fornia women. 

Formerly the Sam Seelig Stores, this chain of 
groceries was a pioneer in the now-prevalent 
plan of operating many branch stores under a 
single management, running on a cash basis and 
selling at a small profit above the low whole- 
sale prices made available by buying huge quan- 
tities at once. 

All the Safeway Stores in a single locality, for 
example, are supplied from a single depot which, 



ECHO PARK MOTHERS' CLUB 

By Patricia C. Anderson, Press Chairman 
Echo Park Mother's Club has been on tiptoe 
since the opening of the club year. Enthusiasm 
over the ownership of their new club home has 
been the stimulus. 

The bazaar held November 14, was a great 
financial success. Mrs. George Marden was 
chairman assisted by Madames Patricia Ander- 
son, Edwin Talbott, Theresa Pearson, Hattie 
Chapman, Bernice Meyers, Harry Snyder, and 
H. E. Gordon. One of the delightful features 
was the Japanese tea garden, where Mrs. H. E. 
Gudin, chairman of Drama, presented a one act 
Japanese play. At the conclusion the cast in cos- 
tume served tea. 

On November 18 the club celebrated the Dia- 




nnHE highest award of the 
'- American Association of 
Medical Milk Commissions 
went for the second time to 
,OOHl CERTIFIED-GUERNSET MILK 
at Atlantic City in May. 



Its winning score of 99.5% in 
this annual National contest was 
on samples from the regular daily 
run. Adohr's record of continuous 
high scores has never been equalled. 




DECEMBER, 1925 



Page 31 



mond Jubilee of California with an all da^' meet- 
ing. Lunch was sensed at noon. Mrs. Bemice 
Meyers and Mrs. E. J. Clapp acted as hostesses. 
The tables were beautiful in Spanish decorations 
and the menu was carried out with Spanish 
dishes. 

At 2 o'clock the program was in charge of 
!Mrs. H. E. Gudin, who gave a toast to Cali- 
fornia. Mrs. Florence Dodson Schoneman, presi- 
dent of the California Historj' and Landmarks 
Club, gave a talk on the "Social Customs of 
Early California." Miss Isabell Lowers sang "I 

Love You California," by Silverwood. Miss . 
Billie Reily danced the Spanish fandango. The 
Drama class presented a one act play, Mexican 
Rose, by Cavanaugh. 

Social Service will be the uppermost thought 
for December. Mrs. Harry Snyder, the beloved 
chairman, will make elaborate plans for the holi- 
days. This department never fails to do some- 
thing big each year in helping those who are less 
fortunate. The department raises money to 
maintain the room at the Utah Maternity Cot- 
tage that the club furnished some years ago. 
Also to keep a girl in carfare and lunch money 
at the Belmont High School. 



LONG BEACH EBELL 

By Mrs. Frederick Gump, Jr., Acting Press Chairman 

The Charter Day Luncheon of the Ebell Club 
of Long Beach was held Tuesday, November 
17, 1925. Almost 400 members assembled in 
joyous appreciation of the club's birthday cele- 
bration. 

Upon entering the doors of the spacious din- 
ing room of the club home at Third and Cerritos 
Avenues, eyes responded to the warm glow of 
the year's maturity. Tables were centered with 
luscious fruits which were heaped high in set- 
tings of earth brown and yellow. 

On the speaker's table which reached the 
length of one end of the dining room, baskets of 
fruits were twined with autumn-tinted vines and 
connected with branches aglow with clusters of 
red and yellow berries. Balconies were edged 
with a variety of blossoms typical of the season. 

The decorations were in charge of Mrs. 
Charles M. Davis and her able committee, which 
included Mesdames H. H. McCoy, James K. 



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Reid, Lynn Hudson, Audrey Thomas, and M. F. 
Workman. The luncheon menu consisted of the 
usual Thanksgiving delicacies. 

The fruitage of the twenty-nine years of club 
life was presented with as graceful an artistry as 
that used in the arrangement of the decorations 
upon each table. 

Mrs. Charles Wiley, club president, opened 
the delightful program hour with a clever wel- 
come in rhyme, closing with a toast to "Our 
Club the Best, It Leads the Rest." Although 
Mrs. Wiley apologized to Mother Goose for her 
next speech, there is no doubt the versatile old 
lady would have joined in the enthusiastic club 
applause which was given after Mrs. Wiley's 
clever presentation of her executive board, in 
paraphrase of "The House That Jack Built" to 
"The House That Ebell Built." 

She also presented the past presidents of the 
club, of which 10 were present, beginning with 
Mrs. B. P. Dayman who has been a member of 
the club for twenty-five years. Other past presi- 
dents in attendance were, Mesdames John M. 
Edgar, F. L. Rogers, R. J. Booth, J. D. Humis- 
ton, E. J. Wightman, Clay White, E. C. Jones, 
W. S. Stephens, and Charles F. Van de Water. 
Mrs. E. H. Jackson, the only charter member 
present, was also presented. 

Mrs. Louise P. Frary, octogenarian, gave a 
resume of the beginnings of things in club life 



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Page 32 



The CLUBWOMAN 



contrasting wittily the days when a woman even 
in club life could not buy even a $10 bond with- 
out permission of friend husband, which was 
sometimes withheld, while but a year ago two 
clubwomen signed a note for $85,000. Times 
have changed a great deal particularly for the 
club woman as they have now gained the con- 
fidence of the business people in general as it has 
been proven they are quite as clever and business 
like as any man. 

The next speaker that was introduced by Mrs. 
Wiley w^as Mrs. Oscar Hauge whose subject 
was "The Service of the Club Through Cul- 
ture." Mrs. Hauge said in part that "Culture 
at one time meant only the cultivation of the 
soil, but in the process of evolution people had 
learned that the mental crops could be sown and 
cultivated also and the culture of today teaches 
us how to live in a wider sense." 

Mrs. H. H. Spratt had as her topic "The 
Service of the Club Through Friendship." "The 
only way to have a friend is to be one," she 
quoted, and she showed how Ebell life had 
taught the art of being friendly. 

Mrs. R. J. Booth spoke on "The Service of 
the Club Through Co-operation." "Through 
unity," she said, "all human betterment has 
come, and the steps are action, vision, prompt- 




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ness program, system, order and last and great- 
est of all, love." 

The lovely musical program, which gave an 
added charm to the day was a fitting closing to 
the day that will long be remembered, November 
17, 1925. It was as follows: 

Mrs. Ada Potter Wiseman, a member of the 
club and a popular entertainer, gave two beau- 
tiful song groups, with Miss Clara Graham at 
the piano. Her numbers were "Morning on 
ze Bayou" (Strickland), "Passing By" (Pur- 
chell), "Do Not Go My Love" (Hageman), in 
. the first group, and "One Golden Day" (Foster), 
"Sylvelin" (Sindling) and "The Last Song" 
(Rogers) in her concluding group. 

The Eva Anderson violin quartet, with Miss 
Graham at the piano, gave three charming groups 
which included, "Vorspiel" (Prelude) (Richard 
Wagner), "Melody" (Vice President Charles 
G. Dawes), "Tarantella" (Hellemesberger), 
"Largo" (Handel), "The Mermaids" (Chris- 
tian Kriens) and "Polonaise M i 1 i t a i r e" 
(Chopin). 



PHILANTHROPY AND CIVICS CLUB 

Mrs. Herbert S. Denitz, Press Chairman 

The children of the poorest school in the city 
will be the richest in happiness when arrange- 
ments now being planned by the Philanthropy 
and Civics Club will be consummated in a 
Christmas party to be given at the clubhouse in 
South Wilton Place for the needy children of 
the Miramonte School. 

Contributions totaling $200 have already been 
received from club members to be utilized in pro- 
viding true Christmas joy for thes "little broth- 
ers and sisters," while Mrs. E. C. Pyle will fur- 
nish a fascinating tree, which will revolve and 
play Christmas carols. Artistically gilded mail 
boxes, festively decorated in true Yuletide fash- 
ion, grace many corners of the clubhouse, and 
the members are privileged to drop in their pen- 
nies to be used for the party. 

Toys, clothing, books, candy and a luncheon 
will be given to every child, and in the after- 
noon, following a buffet lunch for the mem- 
bers. Uncle John of radio fame, assisted by 
Queen Titania and her Fairies, will entertain. 
Mrs. Lillian Burkhart Goldsmith, president, 
will relate several Christmas stories. 

With the largest assemblage of women gath- 
ered since the opening of its new year, the club 
honored forty-three of its members at the month- 
ly Birthday Honoree Luncheon, the afternoon 
of Thursday, October 29, at the clubhouse, 
when members whose birthdays occurred during 
July, August, September, and October were 
toasted and feted by their associates. Mrs. Gold- 
smith charmingly carried out her custom to 
which she has adhered for many months, which 
is that of giving a gift to every honoree, while 



DECEMBER, 1925 



Page 33 



Alice Palmer Henderson, one of the guest speak- 
ers of the day, tendered several toasts. 

The House of Friendship, perhaps the most 
important auxiliary within the club, has been 
very active, completely fashioning as many as 
sixty-five garments in one day, which are used 
in the philanthropic work of the organization. 
Two hundred seventy-five pieces of clothing were 
contributed to the needy of Santa Barbara. 



"SPEND YOUR DOLLAR AT 
THE HUT" 

By Mrs. E. B. Latham, Secretary California Hut 

The \voman u'ho wants her Christmas dollar 
to work in three directions should visit that 
most attractive of gift shops — the California 
Hut, at 1026 South Figueroa Street. 

Her money spent for any of the things she 
will find there — and they are specializing this 
year in dollar gifts — will firstly, help these dis- 
abled veterans to help themselves by giving them 
a market for their work, secondly, buy the 
gift she is looking for, and thirdly, save a sec- 
ond dollar which she would probably have paid 
for a like article in one of the further downtown 
shops. 

This is in no sense a charity. Everything 
you will find in this little shop is good for 
value received, and if, in addition to buying 
your Christmas gifts, you are helping these un- 
fortunates of the World War who, though 
they are able to work a good proportion of the 
time are not strong and well enough to com- 
pete with other men in commercial life, you 
•will be giving Christmas a double meaning. 

You will find a splendid assortment of gifts of 
various kinds; exceedingly good leather work, 
lovely baskets, cunning little silver-powdered 
Christmas trees, gorgeous poinsettias in wax, 
and Christmas ^vreaths different from those pur- 
chased elsewhere ; and they will make wreaths 
and garlands for you to order — anything in fact, 
in the way of Christmas decorations. Their 
hand decorated Christmas cards are dainty and 
lovely, and their wax plaques — framed — of fa- 
mous movie stars would make charming little 
gifts for eastern friends. 

This year the Hut has been endeavoring to 
be of greater assistance to the disabled nurses 
of the war, and for that reason there is much 
in the way of dainty needlework — handkerchiefs, 
towels, scarfs, etc. 

A short time ago the Board of Education, 
who supplies vocational teachers for the Hut. 
installed, as a loan, a splendid equipment of wood 
working machinen', and so this year the wooden 
toys for Christmas are unusually fine. 

The Hut's wax dolls and their favors of many 
and various kinds are too well known to need 
description here. 



Through the kindness of Mrs. A. St. Clair 
Culbertson, a shop will be opened in Pasadena 
for the months of November and December for 
the sale of Christmas gifts. Mrs. Culbertson 
has given the rent of a small shop at 11 South 
Marengo Street for these two months, and this 
shop will carry the same lines as the parent Hut 
on Figueroa Street. 



AVERILL STUDY CLUB 

By Clara S. IVardner, Press Chairman 

The Averill Study Club opened its thirty-sixth year 
of active club work Tuesday afternoon, October 6 
at the McDowell club house on Western Ave. 

The present officers are: president, Mrs. Chas. A. 
Silk; recording secretary, Mrs. H. H. Sutherland; 
first vice-president, Mrs. W. B. Kern; treasurer, 
Mrs. Lucille Doyle. 

The club was organized by Mrs. Anna E. Averill 
and was first called the "Averill Classes." Its pur- 
pose was to give busy housewives and mothers a 
chance to brighten up on history, literature, and cur- 
rent topics, and to be able to speak upon these sub- 
jects of general interest without hesitancy. 

The opening day this fall was "Presidents' Day." 
The speakers were Mrs. Juliet Stevers, president 
emeritus of the Averill Club, Mrs. Chas. A. Silk, 
president, and Mrs. J. B. Lorbeer, president of the 
District Federation. Mrs. Lorbeer's subject was 
"Stimulation and Conservation of Constructive 
Forces." A reception and social hour followed the 
meeting. 



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The CLUBWOMAN 



WOMAN'S CLUB OF DOWNEY 

By Judith McKellar, Press Chairman 

The annual courtesy of the Woman's Club of Dow- 
ney, in presenting one public evening of entertain- 
ment for the community, was given on Wednesday, 
October 7, at the high school auditorium. The out- 
standing feature was an illustrated lecture by Prof. 
B. R. Baumgardt, the well known lecturer. The sub- 
ject was "Jerusalem and the Hills of Judea." Hugo 
Kirchoffer of Hollywood led in the community sing- 
ing prior to the lecture, and the Downey Chamber of 
Commerce Band, under the direction of Caesar 
Mattel, gave several selections. 

On Wednesday, October 21, the Music Section of 
the club was regularly organized with Mrs. J. H. 
Ardis as director; and a musical program was given 
and a vice-chairman of the district presented as 
speaker by Mrs. A. L. Harchelrode, chairman of the 
Music Section of the club. 



(Continued from Page 7) 

an art exhibition in the United States. The 
painting or paintings purchased with this sum 
will become the property of the Los Angeles 
Museum. Earl Stendahl has offered a prize of 
$500 for the best painting in the Latin-American 
section of the exhibition, and the government of 
Ecuador, through its Ministry of Public Edu- 
cation, has offered one gold and two silver med- 
als for the best painting and the best figure or 
portrait and landscape in the Ecuadorian section. 
The exhibition w^ill remain on view in the 
museum until the end of January. It will fill 
all the available galleries, including the three 
new painting galleries and the tw^o galleries 
which later will be used for the scientific part 
of the museum. The museum has invited Way- 
man Adams, Victor Higgins, Dr. Alt of the City 
of Mexico and Homer St. Gaudens to be on 
the jury of awards. This jury will meet on 
November 28th to award prizes. 



If the Ladies 

would insist on "Inglewood Chairs" 
from their dealers, our factory could 
give employment to many more peo- 
ple. We make quality dining chairs in 
period patterns, breakfast tables and 
chairs, arm rockers, etc. 

Building up California industries 
helps you as well as us. 

Inglewood Manufacturing 
Company 

Inglewood California 



(Continued from Page 15) 
that it may go to other clubs, any club desiring 
it may phone Mrs. Schrader at GL 2501. 

Because of the luncheon given on Wednesday, 
November 4, in honor of Mrs. John Sherman, 
no luncheon was given at the club, but the lunch- 
eon Wednesday, November 11, was the first lit- 
erature luncheon of the year under the direction 
of Mrs. Orville Routt, chaiman. Mrs. Law- 
rence Larrabee reviewed the "Life and Letters 
of Olive Schreiner and Mrs. Paul Gordan 
Smith, author of the book, "Adobe Days," that 
is to be published this month, told of the sources 
of the material for her book, which deals with 
the early daj's in California. 

Wednesday, November 18, will mark the first 
Child Welfare luncheon of the year, with Dr. 
Mary Hess Brown, chairman, presiding. Mir- 
iam Van Waters, Ph. D., and author of "Youth 
in Conflict," will be the main speaker, while 
heads of the various welfare and civic organiza- 
tions in the city will be guests of honor. 

November 25 Mrs. Roscoe Schrader will have 
charge of the Art luncheon of the club. Guests 
of honor on this day will be Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam Preston Harrison, Dr. and Mrs. William 
A. Bryan, Mr. and Mrs. Howard Chandler 
Christy. 

One of the most enjoyable musical programs 
ever given at the club was the one given by the 
Lepske trio on Wednesday afternoon, Novem- 
ber 4. Jules Lepske, violinist and founder of 
the trio ; Franz Lusschen, Dutch 'cellist, and 
Morris Wolfson, Russian pianist, compose the 
trio. Leotta Lepske, dramatic soprano, was also 
on the program. 

The afternoon program on November 1 1 was 
dedicated to World Peace. Mrs. John C, Urqu- 
hart presided, while the speakers of the day were 
Mrs. Willoughby Rodman, who spoke on the 
Spirit of Latin America; Mrs. Charlotte Bass, 
who represented the Colored Woman's Federa- 
tion ; Mrs. Elizabeth McManus, who spoke on 
"Impressions Received at Geneva" ; Mrs. George 
Gleason, who told of the Honolulu Conference 
on Inter-Pacific Relations, and Mrs. Seward 
Simons telling of the World Court. 

Wednesday afternoon, November 18, a fash- 
ion show was given at the club under the di- 
rection of the Merchants' Bureau of the Holly- 
wood Chamber of Commerce 



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LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 

Our Cars Call in Pasadena and So. Pasadena Tuesdays and Fridays 



Vol. XVI rf^ 

Published Monthly 



JANUARY, 1926 



No. 4 



Office, 521 Grant Bldg., Los Angeles 
Telephone EL. 2734; if no answer, VAndike 0111 
Mail Address Box 26, South Pasadena, Cal. 
Subscription Price 50 Cents Per Year, Ten Cents the Copy Send subscriptions to Mrs. Bert Clifford, Box 26, 

South Pasadena, Cal. 
Edited by the Press Chairnaen of the Clubs Represented 
Entered at the South Pasadena Postoffice as second-class matter. 



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Page 4 



The CLUBWOMAN 



THE WOMAN'S CLUB OF 
YUCAIPA 

By Mrs. R. H. Arnett, Press Chairman 
The 1925-1926 club year of the Yucaipa Woman's 
Ciub opened on Tuesday afternoon, September 15 
with a reception and musical. An invitation was 
extended to every lady in the Valley and especially 
to the new residents to give them a chance to get 
acquainted and learn of the activities of the Club. 
A fine attendance enjoyed the beautiful music num- 
bers after which the president, Mrs. Chester Burns 
told of the club plans. A meeting will be held the 
first Tuesday of each month to promote community 
spirit and further sociability. Fifteen names were 
submitted for membership. 

On October 15-19 was held the Annual Apple Fes- 
tival under the auspices of the Club. Mrs. R. C. 
Osborn as manager is accredited for the biggest and 
best festival ever held with the receipts amounting 
to $3,000. This is held to advertise the "BIG RED 
APPLE" and decrease the debt on the beautiful 
building. Every member works enthusiastically for 
months to accomplish this. 



A man who looks only at one side of a thing 
imagines that every other man does the same 
thing. 



MONTEBELLO WOMAN'S 
CLUB 

By Mabel E. Kennedy, Press Chairman 

The Montebello Woman's Club is plunging into the 

year's work with great enthusiasm and is anticipating 

many gratifying results. 

Community work is the key note of the club this 
year and the Community Service Chairman, Mrs. W. 
C Thomas, is actively engaged in arousing public 
interest in beautifying the ten-acre park owned by the 
city of Montebello. 

Our beautiful new clubhouse is nearing completion, 
and the Annual Flower Show staged by the club and 
the Chamber of Commerce of Montebello, on October 
1, 2 and 3 added a nice sum to the clubhouse funds. 

The Ways and Means Committee, consisting of 
Mrs. Chas. W. Schaack, Mrs. C. Y. James, Mrs. John 
Willhoff, Mrs. Ella D. Townsend, Mrs. W. D. Ste- 
vens and Mrs. B. F. Twigg, was responsible for the 
success of the beautiful flower show which will be 
remembered for its rare blossoms and riot of color. 

Mrs. B. F. Twigg, chairman American Home, and 
her committee served chicken dinner each evening, 
and Mrs. W. D. Steven and committee gave three 
entertaining programs. One a California Jubilee cele- 
bration, with the native daughters of the club in 
Spanish costume. The music was furnished by the 
Mexican Band of Simons Brick Company. 



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JJNUJRY, 1926 



Page 5 



'^Jf^ 



Contents 



C-'=^_} 



Friday Morning Club 6 

Los Angeles Ebell _ - 11 

Woman's Club of Torrance 12 

Woman's Club of HoUy-vvood - 13 

Our Heritage - 17 

Montebello Woman's Club „ 18 

Woman's Club of Indio..._ 18 

The Women's Universitv- Club _ 19 

Highland Park Ebell Club 21 

History and Landmarks Club _ 22 

The Women's Twentieth Century Club of Eagle 

Rock 23 

Los Angeles City Teachers' Club _ 24 

Kate Tupper Galpin Shakespeare Club 24 

Gleason Parliamentary Club 25 

Averill Study Club _ 28 

Woman's Symphony rchestra _ _ 28 

Santa Monica Bay Woman's Club 28 

College Woman's Club of Long Beach -.29 

Tuesday Afternoon Club _ — 30 

University Book Club _ _ 30 

South Side Ebell 30 

Oxnard Woman's Club _ _ 31 

Woman's Auxiliary, R. M. A _ 32 

For Veterans' Children..... 32 

Carpenteria Woman's Club 32 

Buena Park Woman's Club 32 

California History and Landmark Study Club of 

Santa Monica 34 

Irwindale Miscellany Club _ _ 34 

The L. U. B. A. Club of Long Beach 34 

L. A. Dunning Teachers' Club 34 



PASADENA STUDY CLUB 

By Blanche L. Kibble, Press Chairman 
Under the leadership of Mrs. Frank Ward, the 

Pasadena Study club is anticipating a helpful year. 
This group of women ha%'e forged to the front, 

holding its own, in point of accomplishment, with 

larger organizations. 

Programs are the best available to the club's re- 
sources, while much talent is found among the 
members. 

Stress is laid upon the philanthropic work, — sew- 
ing and money being given to charitable institutions, 
as well as liberal donations of gifts at holiday time. 

The Study club will entertain its men-folks with a 
dinner-dance on November 3, and will hold its an- 
nual luncheon in February. These affairs and all 
regular meetings, will take place in the Shakespeare 
clubhouse, on South Los Robles avenue. 

The appointment of Mrs. W. J. Richardson, junior 
past president of the club, as chairman of Emblems 
for the district, and of Mrs. George Daniels, also a 
past president as one of the vice-presidents of the 
History and Landmarks committee is a source of grati- 
fication and pride to their fellow members. 

Repeating Allegiance to the Flag, singing "America 
the Beautiful" and reading, responsively, the Club- 
■womans' Creed, the Pasadena Stud}' Club is endeavor- 
ing to fulfil the spirit of its motto: "Step by Step 
We Gain the Heights." 




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Hosiery "Value: 

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Page 6 



The CLUBWOMAN 



llllllllll 



FRIDAY -WORNIKG CliUB 

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By Mrs. Everett B. Latham, Member of the Board of Directors 

"How far that little candle throws its beams." — Shakespeare 



That the thirty-four years' existence of the 
Friday Morning Club demonstrates that the 
club constitutes a nucleus for confederation and 
for co-operation in the furthering of directed 
efforts of capable women for the public good, 
and facilitates the awakening of talent and ini- 
tiative which might not otherwise be developed, 
is shown by the record of the women listed on 
several pages of the dub's current 5'ear book. 

It is not the purpose of this meagre article 
to follow all the paths whose ways have been 
illumined by the beams of the little candle lighted 
by the little group of women who met in the 
parlors of the Hollenbeck Hotel on the six- 
teenth of April, 1891. That would require 
more space than has been allotted to me, for 
in almost every line of human interest Friday 
Morning Club members have successfully pene- 
trated far afield. 

In literature, art, drama, science, philanthropy, 
medicine, business and public affairs they have 
made their mark — city-wide, state wide, nation 
wide — but it is to the branch of public service 
that I would draw attention at this time, for 
in the affairs of the nation, the state and the 
city the club has been represented to a degree 
that is probably not generally realized — possibly 
even by some of the newer members of the club 
itself. 

Quoting from Mrs. Frank A. Gibson, club 
historian and compiler of the list referred to, 
"The Friday Morning Club has the honor of 
having had named from its membership National 
Committee Women of both major parties, and 
has had an elector in each presidential election 
since 1912." 

Mrs. Florence Collins Porter was, in 1912, 
delegate to the Republican National Convention 
and National Progressive Elector, and in 1916 
member Women's Division Republican National 
Committee. 

1912 — Mrs. Charles D. Blaney was delegate 
to the Republican National Convention. 

1916 — Mrs. Cornelius Cole was delegate to 
the Republican National Convention. 

1916 — Mrs. William Chambers Tyler was 
Democratic Presidential Elector. 

1916-17— Mrs. Martha Nelson McCan was 
Superintendent of Women's Division of Fed- 
eral Labor Bureau, Los Angeles, San Diego and 



Arizona. 

1920 — Miss Mary E. Foy was Associate 
Democratic National Committee%voman. 

1920 — Mrs. Force Parker was delegate to 
the Democratic National Convention. 

1920 — Mrs. Katherine Philips Edson was 
delegate to the National Republican convention; 
in 1924, member of the Executive Committee of 
the Republican National Committee; in 1925, 
member of the Advisory Committee Conference 
on Limitation of Armament. 

1920 — Miss Grace S. Stoermer was Repub- 
lican National Committee Representative for 
California. 

1920 — Mrs. D. G. Stephens was Republican 
Presidential Elector. 

1924— Mrs. Oliver P. Clark was Republican 
National Committeewoman. 

1924 — Dr. Louise Harvey Clarke was Repub- 
lican President Elector. 

1921 to present — Mrs. Mabel Walker Wil- 
lebrandt, Assistant Attorney General of the 
United States. 

In State affairs the club was represented on 
the Btiard of Charities and Corrections in 1910- 
12 by Mrs. Clara Shortridge Foltz, and 1912- 
23 by Mrs. Oliver C. Bryant. 

1912-1916 — Mrs. Andrew Stewart Lobingier 
was a member of Exposition Park Board. 

1916-1920— Mrs. Frances C. Harmon Zahn 
was a member of the State Librarj' Board. 

From 1913 to 1923 Mrs. O. Shepard Barnum 
served on the State Board of Education, and 
Mrs. Oliver C. Bryant on the same board from 
1923 to the present time. 

On the Board of the California School for 
Girls, Mrs. D. G. Stephens served from 1914 
to 1921 and Mrs. Seward A. Simons from 1915 
to 1920. 

On the Industrial Welfare Commission, Mrs. 
Katherine Philips Edson served as Executive 
Commissioner from 1913 to date. 

Mrs. Mar)- S. Gibson served on the Commis- 
sion of Immigration and Housing from 1913 
to 1923. 

Miss Elizabeth L. Kenney has been State In- 
heritance Tax Appraiser since 1917. 

Miss Grace S. Stoermer was assistant secre- 
etary of the California Legislature in 1919, and 
in 1921 secretary of the California Legislature. 

Mrs. Mary Moore Flint was on the board 



JANUARY, 1926 



Page 7 



of the Pacific Colony from 1917 to 1921. 

Mrs. Bertha L. Cable was Deputy Labor 
Commissioner 1921-1922, and on the board of 
the Pacific Colony 1920-1922. 

Mrs. Joseph F. Sartori was appointed regent 
of the University of California in June, 1919, 
and was reappointed in 1922 for a term of six- 
teen years. 

Finally, in municipal affairs, we find a long 
list of women ^vho have been called upon to 
give of their time and efforts in the running of 
the machinery of this large and growing city. 

On the original Municipal Charities Commis- 
sion in 1913 were Mrs. Oliver P. Clark and 
Mrs. Willetts J. Hole. 

On the City Board of Education, Mrs. Rus- 
sell Judson Waters served from 1915 to 1917; 
Mrs. George Herbert Clark, elected in 1923, 
will serve until 1929; Mrs. R. L. Craig served 
from 1911 to 1914; Mrs.' Norman MacBeth, 
elected in 1923, will sen-e until 1927; Mrs. 
^lary C. Millspaugh served from 1921 to 1923. 

On the Social Service Commission, Mrs. J. T. 
Anderson served from 1918 to 1921; Mrs. Ben- 
jamin Goldman from 1916 to 1918; IMrs. Jules 
kaufiman from 1919 to 1922; Miss Therese 
Levy from 1921 to 1925; :\Irs. Charles H. Rich- 
mond, 1921 to the present time. * 
, On the City Planning Commission, Mrs. Gus- 
tav Biorkman served 1924-1925; ]\Irs. A. B. 
Cooke. 1921 to 1923; Mrs. Herman S. Darling, 
1921 to 1925; Mrs. Randall Hutchinson, 1920 
to 1924; Mrs. Cora Deal Lewis, 1920 to 1925; 
Mrs. Lewis also served on the City Housing 
Commission from 1910 to 1921; Mrs. Matthew 
S. Robertson was on the City Planning Com- 
mission frqm 1920 to 1921, and Mrs. John J. 
Abramson, on the Cit^- Planning Commission 
from 1921 to 1925. was this year made presi- 
dent of that commission with a term running 
to 1928. 

Mrs. Edward Rankin Brainerd was Civil 
Service Commissioner, 1916 to 1922; on the 
Cit}' Nursing Commission were ^Irs. A. N. 
Davidson, 1915 to 1919; Mrs. Henr)- Dietrich, 
1921 to 1925; Dr. Julia R. Johnson, 1916 to 
1920. 

On the Board of Motion Picture Censors were 
Mrs. E. K. Foster, 1912 to 1914; .Mrs. Philip 
J. Hubert, 1913 to 1914; IVIrs. Florence Moore 
Kreider, 1913-1914; Mrs. Kreider was also on 
the Playground Commission from 1918 to 1921. 

On the Municipal Art Commission Mrs. 




Sumner P. Hunt served from 1914 to 1922, and 
Mrs. Julia Bracken Wendt from 1917 to 1921. 

Mrs. Hunt and Mrs. W. J. Washburn were 
appointed by the Los Angeles City Council in 
1904, a permanent committee to pass upon all 
works of art to come into the possession of the 
city. 

Mrs. Estelle Lawton Lindsey was a member 
of the City Council from 192i to 1923; Mrs. 
Martha Nelson McCan was on the Civil Serv- 
ice Commission from 1912 to 1918 and on the 
Park Commission from 1921 to 1925. 

Mrs. Willoughby Rodman was on the Play- 
ground Commission from 1904 to 1923, and 
Mrs. Arthur C. Wier for a term from 1921 to 
1926. 

Mrs. Leafie Sloan-Orcutt was president of 
the Park Commission from 1917 to 1921; Mrs. 
Shelley Tolhurst was on the Board of Free- 
holders in 1923 and Library Director 1912 to 
1915; Mrs. J. Wells Smith, Library Director 
1920 to 1928, and Mrs. Frances M. Harmon, 
Zahn Library Director 1914 to date. 



SILENT SINGING 

Exercises by which great singers build and restore the 

voice. Equally _ valuable for the health and speaking 

voice of chose who do not sing. 

Mme. Irwin Kellogg 

Friday Morning Club House, Mondaj'S and Thursdays. 
Res. Phone WHitney 7793 TUcker 6288 



GRACE ADELE FREEBEY 

Pianist and Teacher of Piano 
Studio — Friday Morning Club House 

940 So. Figueroa Street 
Phone TUcker 6288 Residence Phone 52969 



Page 8 



The CLUBWOMAN 



It seems obvious from a consideration of the 
above that this form of organization is accom- 
plishing a dual good, for it affords an opportu- 
nity for capable women to gain education, knowl- 
edge, and familiarity with public affairs and 
measures for the public good, and is therefore 
of benefit to the women themselves, and it has 
also brought to the community and state the de- 
votion and services of women who have bettered 
the moral tone of the community by their devo- 
tion to its welfare. 

Scores of the women who are members of the 
Friday Morning Club have been presidents of 
other organizations. To name them all would 
be manifestly impossible. 

It has given one president of the General Fed- 
eration of Women's Clubs — Mrs. Josiah Evans 
Cowles. Five Presidents of the California Fed- 
eration of Women's Clubs have come from its 
ranks — Mrs. Robert J. Burdette, Mrs. Josiah 
Evans Cowles, Mrs. Russell J. Waters, Mrs. 
Herbert A. Cable, and Mrs. John C. Urqu- 
hart. Nine of the thirteen presidents of the Los 
Angeles District Federation of Women's Clubs 
have been its members — Mrs. C. N. Flint, Mrs. 
Oliver C. Bryant, Mrs. Florence Collins Porter, 
Mrs. Russell J. Waters, Mrs. William Baur- 
hyte, Mrs. W. C. Mushet, Mrs. Herbert A. 
Cable, Mrs. Lloyd W. Harmon and Mrs. John 
C. Urquhart. 

While it would be impossible to name all the 
"President members" of the club, in this thirty- 
fifth year of its life the following thirteen women 
hold that position among the clubs belonging to 
the great international Federation of Women's 
Clubs : 

Mrs. J. T. Anderson of the Opera and Fine 
Arts Club : Mrs. Marshall Stookey Anderson 
of the Matinee Musical Club ; Mrs. R. A. Chap- 
man of the Washington Heights Club of Pasa- 
dena ; Mrs. F. M. Dimmick of the Crafts Study 
Club; Mrs. D. M. Fagg of the Wilmington 
Women's Club; Mrs. Lillian Burkhart Gold- 
smith of the Philanthropy and Civics Club and 
also of the Council of Jewish Women ; Mrs. 
Cora Deal Lewis of the Civic Association of 
Los Angeles; Mrs. Ella Meeker of the Reci- 
procity Club: Mrs. William Read of the Los 
Angeles Ebell Club ; Mrs. Charles H. Richmond 
of the Hollyivood Woman's Club ; Mrs. Flor- 
ence Dodson Schoneman of the California His- 
torj' and Landmarks Club; Mrs. Charles A. 
Wiley of the Long Beach Ebell, and Mrs. Nellie 
Graham Sinclair of the Southern California 
Press Club. 

Among organizations outside of the Federa- 
tion which are headed by Friday Morning Club 
women are the California Hut, Mrs. Boyle 
Workman, president; Maternity Home, Mrs. 
William Baurhyte, president; the Assistance 



League, Mrs. Hancock Banning, president; the 
Woman's Auxiliary of the American Institute 
of Mining Engineers, Mrs. Frederick B. Close, 
president; the California League of Women 
Voters, Mrs. H. H. Koons, president ; the South- 
ern Section of the California League of Women 
Voters, Mrs. Arthur Wier, president; the 
Women's Athletic Club, Mrs. Robert J. Bur- 
dette, president; the Women's Republican Club, 
Mrs. Josephine Winn, president ; the Big Sisters 
League, Mrs. Rose Bryant, president ; the 
Womens University Club, Mrs. Laurence Lar- 
rabee, president ; the State Federation of Wo- 
mens Republican Clubs, Mrs. O. P. Clark, 
president ; Juvenile Protective Association, Mrs. 
E. K. Foster, president; Resthaven, Mrs. O. P. 
Clark, president governing board ; Los Angeles 
Foreign Relief, Mrs. Willoughby Rodman, 
president; Lyric Club, ]\'Irs. Laird J. Stabler, 
president ; Daughters of American Colonists, 
Mrs. Earl J. Fellows, State President; Daugh- 
ters of Founders and Patriots of America, Mrs. 
Ernest W. Thayer, State President; the Bird 
Study Club, Miss Mary Mann Miller, presi- 
dent ; Los Angeles Branch, League of American 
Penwomen, Mrs. Bertha Lincoln Heustis, pres- 
ident ; The Womans City Club, Mrs. J. T. An- 
dersorv president ; the Los Angeles Orphan 
Home Society (Extension Committee) iMrs, 
Ernest A. Bryant, president ; Los Angeles Needle- 
work Guild, Mrs. Norman MacBeth, president. 

In addition to the above, five Friday Morning 
Club women are presidents emeritus of other 
organizations. Mrs. Caroline Eager of the 
Dickens Fellowship; Mrs. D. G. Stephens of 
the Santa Monica Bay Womans Club ; Mrs. 
Cecil Frankel California State Federation of 
Music Clubs ; Mrs. Leslie W. Hall, Mayflower 
Association of Southern California; and Mrs. 
Boyle Workman, Honorary President of the 
Needlework Guild. 

These t^vo latter lists do not pretend to be 
complete, since there is no place in which un- 
federated organizations are completely listed, 
and individual memory and knowledge are but 
poor things upon which to depend, but even 
though the list is incomplete, we may point with 
no little feeling of pride to the influence of the 
Friday Morning Club, spreading in geometri- 
cal progression far beyond its immediate circle 
of t\vent\'-six hundred women. 



AN APPRECIATION 

The recent gift of a little book to the librarj' 
of The Friday Morning Club recalls to mind 
the personality of one of its most distinguished 
women, Mrs. M. Burton Williamson, one of 
those early members who have made The Fri- 
day Morning Club stand before the world in a 



JANUARY, 1926 



Page 9 



light shared by no other club of its kind. 

Mrs. Williamson was a most versatile woman, 
but it was her studies in conchology which caused 
her to become nationally known, and to be one 
of the first women to be listed in "Who's Who" 
under science. 

Although born in England, she lived and was 
educated in the Middle West, and never until 
1886, when she came to Los Angeles to live, 
saw a sea shell in its native habitat, but such 
was her interest and intense application that 
within two years of the time when she picked 
up her first shell on the shores of San Pedro 
Bay, she had made an annotated list of all the 
shells of that region which was accepted by the 
Smithsonian at Washington and published in the 
proceedings of the National Museum. 

Later she wrote for the Nautilus, the Over- 
land Monthly, the Popular Science News and 
some thirty other magazines, and two shells 
were named for her by the Smithsonian. 

Mrs. Williamson conducted the Zoological 
Department of the summer school at Long Beach 
in 1894, was a member of the Association for 
the Advancement of Science, Vice-President of 
the Biological Society at Washington, con- 
ducted the conchological department of the Pop- 
ular Science News and the Isaac Lea Depart- 
ment of the Nautilus. 

Five cases of her remarkable collection of 
shells are on exhibition in the museum at Expo- 
sition Park. 

Mrs. Williamson was the mother of the Uni- 
versity Ethical Club, a charter member of The 
Friday Morning Club, and the second Presi- 
dent of the Southern California Press Club, but 
her chief local interest lay along historical lines, 
and she was signally instrumental in helping to 
organize the Southern California Historical So- 
ciet}', of which she was Vice-President for twenty 
years. 

She writes most interestingly of it, and says, 
"A call was made in 1883 and but four persons 
responded, but a month or so later another call 
brought fifteen, and the Historical Society was 
organized in a Citv Court room in the Temple 
Block." 

Reading further we find, "Shall we wait until 
those qualified to discern the true from the false 
in the history of past events are no longer with 
us? There is a great deal of historical data ex- 
isting in the memory of our oldest citizens and 
pioneers. Many valuable historical events are 
remembered by ■ our Spanish and Mexican citi- 
zens and some of our members are sufficiently 
versed in the Spanish language to bring to us 
reminiscences of our oldest inhabitants; many of 
our pfoneers remember the inception and early 
growth of events that are now culminating 
around us." She speaks of the disadvantages 
under which the Society' labored, without a 




Bullock's 



Broadway— HUl 
and — SeventK^ 



' One o Cloclc ^ a tci r'dax/o' ' 



^age^ 10 



The CLUBWOMAN 



storeroom for the valuable records which it 
gradually accumulated until there was no oppor- 
tunity for reference, and says, "There is an 
abundance of means in Southern California, 
were we as interested in the history of our state 
as we are in its prosperity commercially." 

The little book, a portion of Mrs. William- 
son's historical work entitled "Ladies' Clubs and 
Societies in Los Angeles in 1892" will take the 
reader back to the time when there was no Fri- 
day Alorning Club, and when the word "ladies" 
still possessed its old-fashioned meaning with the 
charming attributes of kindliness and generosity, 
as witnessed by Mrs. Williamson's story of how 
a prominent Jewish woman, well versed in the 
giving of bazaars in the east and other countries, 
gladly gave her advice and services to the Catho- 
lic Sisters who wished to raise money for their 
orphanage. 

Mrs. Williamson was charming in appearance 
— a blond, always dressing in golden brown, and 
in her later years in shades of lavendar and pur- 
ple. 

She served in two wars — in the Civil War as 
a young girl, in charge of the diet kitchen of the 
Sanitary Commission, and in the World War as 
the head of the Blind Relief in California. 

A long life and full of honors, and one to 
make both proud and humble the later members 
who are reaping the benefits of the impetus 
given The Friday iNIorning Club by founders 
such as Mrs. Williamson. 

From notes by Mrs. Frank A. Gibson. 

E. D. L. 



FRIDAY MORNING CLUB NOTES 

By Mrs. Frederick Hickok 
Chairman of Press 

The Tuesday meetings of the Friday Morn- 
ing Club have been of unusual interest and the 
Committee luncheons, which were resumed this 
year and follow the morning meetings, are gain- 
ing in popularit}' and attendance. 

On the first Tuesday in December the Public 
Affairs Committee, under the direction of Mrs. 
John J. Abramson, gave a program on "Needed 
Legislation to Insure Building Safety," which 
created a widespread interest, as regulations rela- 
tive to building heights present one of the most 
important problems in city government, involv- 
ing as it does problems of safety, convenience and 
efficiency. 

There are si.xteen sub-committees working 
under the Public Affairs and they carry on a 
work as extensive in its scope as many an entire 
club. 

The second Tuesday in December the Liter- 
ature Committee, under the chairmanship of 
Dorothea Moore, gave a program on "Children 



in Literature," presented by Rosemary Livsey, 
of the childrens department of the Library. 

On Tuesday, December 15th, Mrs. W. F. 
Thurston, chairman of the Drama Committee, 
had a most interesting morning devoted to 
"Modern Domestic Comedy" and the plays of 
Kauffman and Connolly, James Forbes and 
George Kelly were discussed. At the luncheon 
Mrs. Allison Gaw gave a review of "Pharoh's 
Daughter," and Mrs. Mabel Wing Castle told 
of the Prize Play Contest being conducted by 
the Drama department of the club. On Decem- 
ber 29th, this department put on a matinee at 
which Mr. and Mrs. Roger Noble Burnham 
presented a three act comedy, entitled "Mr. 
Tister's Temerity," by Samuel Bawker, and at 
the luncheon, "Living Titles" were presented in 
costume, under the direction of Margaret Bar- 
berick Gillette. 

The Art Committee had no Tuesday meeting 
in December on account of the holiday season, 
but all during the month had an exhibition in the 
Gallery of Arts and Crafts which was the finest 
of its kind ever shown in the club ; also an ex- 
hibition of miniatures, by Laura M. D. Mitch- 
ell, president of the California Miniature Paint- 
ers. Beginning in January, Mrs. Richard Far- 
rell, chairman of the Art Committee and Miss 
Grace Adele Freeby are going to inaugurate a 
series of monthly musical art programs, begin- 
ning the first Tuesday of the month and to be 
held in Miss Freeby 's Studio. 

On December llth the California Hut held 
their Christmas sale in the foyer of the club, 
a privilege not extended to any other organiza- 
tion. 

On Dec. 22nd Dr. Elizabeth Sullivan lectured 
before the Psychology Committee on "The Duct- 
less Glands and their Relation of Character and 
Conduct." 

The January calendar shows that many noted 
speakers will be heard during the month, such 
as Sherwood Anderson, Ritza Freeman Rear- 
don, Lewis N. Chase, Ph.D., and others. 

The Emergency Auxiliary, which works for 
the Orthopedic Hospital, will give a bridge 
luncheon on January 28th, under the chairman- 
ship of Mrs. W. A. Bonynge and a large com- 
mittee. 



Los Angeles : 617-619S. Broadway 
Pasadena : Colorado at Los Robles 

Apparel for Women, Misses and Juniors 



I 



JANUARY, 1926 



Page 11 



•£05" -m^aGUE^ -esem 



Mrs. E. A. Tufts, 
Dear Marj' Jane : 

You ask me to tell you what it means to be 
Financial Secretary' of The Ebell of Los An- 
geles. In answering your question, I shall have 
to be very .personal and tell you what it means 
to me, because it is so close that I do not get 
much of a perspective. It is needless to say to 
you that the first and very vital meaning is that 
it furnishes my bread and butter and whatever 
jam there is in life. 

As for the duties— don't blame me if I wear 
you out enumerating them, you brought it on 
yourself. There is the telephone; at once the 
joy and bane of my existence. It has been known 
to begin the day as early at 6:15 and to keep at 
it until 11 o'clock at night. And the questions 
that come over it! I wish I had made a list 
of the absurd things I have heard through that 
receiver. I have heard many nice things, too, 
but I often wish it would keep still long enough 
for me to finish adding a column of figures, or 
addressing a letter, or whatever it may be that 
I am doing when that insistent bell begins to 
ring. 

The book-keeping falls to my lot. The actual 
running accounts would not worry me, but to 
keep the membership straight wrings my soul 
with anguish. Out of a membership of about 
twenty-six hundred, there are always some who 
resign, or lose interest and fail to pay dues and 
have to go through the routine of being dropped 
from the list; there are people who have lived 
out of town having the non-resident rate who 
return to Los Angeles and wish to be reinstated 
to full membership ; and there are others who are 
irregular foi' one reason or another. For every 
deviation, I have to make four different entries 
and attach a signal to the ledger card ; then when 
said member changes her mind and does the 
thing she saj's she was not going to do, all those 
entries have to be reversed. And somewhere 
along the maze and among the interruptions, I 
am likely to lose my way, and I sometimes spend 
hours trying to find my way out again. 

The mail requires attention three or four times 
a day, and once in a while I have an opportunity 
to sharpen my literary tools on a letter or two. 
The Governor, the Mayor and the gentlemen 
of the City Council are among my correspond- 
ents. To be sure, the replies usually read, 
"Your communication received and placed on 
file." Even the President of the United States 
has had a letter from our office. We have had 
replies from two of them — one of them signed 
by the President himself. (O yes! We have it 
framed.) ^ 



Ch, 




Miss Bess Osborne, Financial Secretary of the Los 
Ajigeles Ebell Club 

The renters are — like the proverb — "always 
with us." Our regular tenants are a delight 
and we greet them like old friends. Some of the 
transients are, too, but some of them have the 
idea that they own the building, its contents and 
all the employees from the time the engagement 
is made until "the shouting and the tumult dies." 
It is part of my business to see that the house 
is cleaned and in the order the tenant wishes — 
if he doesn't wish too much, and to pacify both 
tenant and overtired helpers in case he doesn't 
get all he has wished. 

At all times, I am supposed to know that we 
are supplied with coal, kindling, soap, towels, 
bon ami, brooms, mops, dish towels, garden tools ; 
with stationery, minute books, committee badges 
and every conceivable thing that is needed in 
housekeeping, office or club work. To see that 
the ^vindows are washed, silver polished, floors 
and rugs cleaned, the laundry sent, the house 
arranged for the meetings, the flag out, tables 
set for luncheons, with the exact number of places 
ordered. If it is a luncheon of our own, it is 
my privilege to make the place cards and see that 



Page 12 



The CLUBWOMAN 



they are arranged as the hostess wants them. 

My own luncheon hour is a joke. If I ever 
had one in peace, I would think that the end of 
the world is near. That is the favorite time 
for the telephone to ring and for the prospective 
renter to come to look over the house. 

I do penance once a month while putting 
nearly 2700 bulletins and various enclosures into 
the envelopes for mailing. 

Innumerable solicitors call with anything and 
everything to sell. Visiting club women come to 
see the house and to know the history of the 
club, and to learn how we financed the building 
of the club house. 

One of the greatest difficulties is convincing 
the laity that the Ebell Clubs of the city ate not 
branches of our organization. It is very flatter- 
ing to know that we are admired to the extent 
of having namesakes, but I wish we had a copy- 
right on the name so that we would not be 
obliged to expose our ignorance by being unable 
to answer questions about the other Ebells. 

I have not mentioned finances or the reason 
why I am called financial secretary. (I dare say 
I am called many other things during the course 
of the day.) But the title is applied because I 
receive and spend all the money ; spending it by 
order of the board and the signature of the presi- 
dent and treasurer on the checks. There is some 
lively scrambling at times — when we have a big 
deposit — to make receipts and cash agree. You 
ought to see the yards of deposit slips when we 
have a lot of money to send to the bank. Every 
check is listed separately (one day we had 635 
ten dollar checks) and the clearing house num- 
ber has to correspond with the amount. Miss 
Lower, who upholds the dignity of assistant 
financial secretary, is all that the name implies. 
I would not care to think of trying to run the 
ofBce without her. Her friendly spirit is never 
more evident than when I get in deep water. 
She alwaj's throws me a life line to bring me to 
shore. 

There is a multitude of petty details which fill 
the days: there are troubles to hear and injured 
feelings to salve: there are first aid remedies to 
be applied : all sorts of emergencies to be met 
and unforseen impossibilities to be turned into 
possibilities or even realities. No two days are 
alike and the interest never wanes. 

You ask if there are compensations for long 
hours and nerve strain. Now stop! Look! and 



Listen ! Mary Jane ! My days are spent with 
the finest women of Los Angeles and that means 
the top cream, because there are none finer any- 
where. While I enjoy many of the pleasures 
and privileges vicariously, I have not bcjen 
stinted in friendship, and the friends I have made 
in and through the club are worth far more than 
any position I might have reached had I gone 
into business, or any remuneration I might have 
received in another profession. The club's motto 
is "I Serve," and when I close the day with the 
feeling that I have been of real service and have 
helped to carry on the Ebell spirit, I am content. 
Very sincerely yours, 

Bess F. Osborne. 



JANUARY MUSICAL 

Mrs. Richard Farrell, Art Chairrhan of the 
Friday Morning Club, and Grace Adele Free- 
bey, pianiste, are giving the first of a series of 
musical art-teas on January 5, at 2 p. m., in the 
art gallery of the Friday Morning Club House 
and in Miss Freebey's studio, which adjoins the 
art gallery. 

Preceding the exhibition of paintings, a short 
musical program will be given by one of Miss 
Freebey's artist pupils, Miss Frances Bates, pian- 
iste, assisted by Mrs. Robert Wankowski, so- 
prano. Miss Freebey will accompany Mrs. 
Wankowski and play the second piano for two 
of Miss Bates' numbers. 

All interested in the arts are cordially in- 
vited to attend. 



WOMEN'S CLUB 
TORRANCE 



OF 



Phoebe J. Milbum, Press Chairman 

Formal opening of the beautiful new clubhouse of 
the Women's Club of Torrance was held on Thurs- 
day, October 29, with District Federation officers and 
members of neighboring clubs present. 

The club members were present at the dedication of 
the clubhouse which was opened for inspection to the 
general public. The informal opening of the club- 
house was held on Thursday, October 8, beginning 
with a luncheon at 12:30, followed by the regular 
club session at 2 o'clock. Mrs. F. L. Park, the presi- 
dent, was in charge. 

On Friday evening, October 23, an invitational 
dance was given in the clubhouse auditorium. 



San Francisco Santa Barbara Los Angeles Oakland 

GOVERNMENT, MUNICIPAL, DISTRICT AND CORPORATION BONDS 



San Diego 



JANUARY, 1926 



Page 13 






WDM AW^ GWB OFmwmOOD 



THE RING AND THE BOOK 

By Mrs. Hector Geiger 






A talk given before the Brozvning section of 
the IVoTTian's Club of Hollywood 

There is a city in Florence, in the Piazza San 
Lorenzo, a statue bj^ Baccio Bandinelli — a statue 
of Giovanni de Medici, called "Giovanni delle 
Bande Nere," "John of the Black Bands," who 
was killed in battle in 1526. He was the father 
of Cosimo the Great, who was the first one of 
the dukes of Florence to bear the title Grand 
Duke of Tuscany. The statue stands between 
the church of San Lorenzo and the Palazzo Ric- 
cardi, which was the palace of the famous Medici 
family. 

It was about noon on a market day in the 
month of June, and the year must have been 
1860, when Robert Browning walked across the 
Square toward this statue, "where sits and men- 
aces John of the Black Bands with the upright 
spear," and, turning toward the palace steps, 
there, "precisely on that palace step which, meant 
for lounging knaves o' the Medici, now serves 
re-venders to display their wares." He found 



on a stall, in the midst of all sorts of trash — 
"odds and ends of ravage," he calls it — an old 
yellow book, which he immediately bought for 
a lira. 

Having bought the book and buried his head 
in it, he pursued his way homeward to Casa 
Guidi on the other side of the Arno, and he 
declares that by the time he had reached the 
stainvay that led up to his apartments, he had 
mastered the contents of the old yellow book; 
that is, he had not necessarily read every word 
of it, but he knew what it was all about. This 
is no small tribute to his ability as a scholar, 
when one considers the fact that the book is 
"part print, part manuscript," the ink a good 
deal faded sometimes, and that it is in cramped 
Latin" interfilleted with Italian streaks." 

That evening, on the little balcony on the side 
of his house just across from San Felice church, 
the whole story contained in the old yellow book 
came to life in his imagination ; he felt the whole 
thing become real again. He says : 



The Los Angeles 

Elizabeth oArden 

Salon 

•with 

J. W. ROBINSON CO. 

UNDER the direct management of 
Miss Arden and her New York staff 
and offering the same specialized treat- 
ments that have made Miss Arden's other 
salons internationally known. 

SEVENTH FLOOR 




Page 14 



The CLUBWOMAN 



"I fused my live soul, and that inert stuff." 
And again, "The life in me abolished the death 
of things, 

Deep calling unto deep." 

The old j^ellow book is now in the library of 
Balliol College, Oxford, and is a small quarto 
size volume 7^4 by 10 inches, one inch thick, 
containing about 260 pages with crumpled vel- 
lum covers." It- contains the legal documents 
relating to the trial of Count Guido Franes- 
chini and four accomplices who were executed 
on February 22, 1698 in the Piazza del Popolo 
in Rome for m.urder. It was the rule then in 
Rome that pleadings of counsel for prosecution 
and defense must be submitted to the court in 
print. Hence these documents — eleven of them 
lawyers' arguments ; three, summaries of evi- 
dence ; and two referring to a subsequent peti- 
tion to clear Pompilia's reputation. With these 
16 official documents have been bound up two 
unofficial pamphlets and three manuscript letters. 
This old yellow book, together with three other 
sources of information, formed the materials out 
of which Browning constructed "The Ring and 
The Book." The three other sources were: 

1. A manuscript giving an account of the 
murder. ' 

2. A pen and ink drawing of Count Guido 
Franeschini. 

3. A water color sketch of the arms of the 
Franeschini family. 

These are all Browning had, but the old yel- 
low book was his chief source, and in handling 
the materials found in the old yellow book, he 
felt an unusual responsibility, and his faithful- 
ness in details is remarkable. In the matter of 
the chronology of the tragedy, he is almost pain- 
fully accurate, having mastered all the dates 
carefully. Whenever he mentions in his narra- 
tive time of day, the days of the week, the sea- 
sons of the year, intervals of time, or ages of 
persons, he is studiously accurate.' 

As an example, Caponsacchi says : "There's a 
ne^v moon this eve," and Prof. Charles W. Ho- 
dell, who translated the old yellow book tells us 




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that Browning would not let that line stand 
until he had consulted an astronomer and had 
him figure back to find that there actually was 
a new moon at that time. Prof. Hodell's trans- 
lation is a work of inestimable value, for the old 
yellow book has been reproduced in photographic 
facsimile and this reproduction, with the trans- 
lation, additional source material, critical essay 
and notes was issued by the Carnegie Institution 
of Washington in July, 1908. Hodell thinks 
that the architecture of the poem, its unusual 
plan, seems to have been devised with the purpose 
of fullest truth, telling concerning the material 
before the artist. 

There are, however, some departures from the 
details of the book and these Prof. Hodell points 
out in his critical essay and notes. Of these one 
of the most interesting is Browning's changing 
the date of the flight from early Monday morn- 
ing, April 29, 1697, which it actually was, to 
early Tuesday morning, April 23, in the preced- 
ing week, and, of course, changing accordingly 
the other dates which this carries with it. This 
was done no doubt for artistic reasons, that is, 
to make the flight begin on St. George's day, 
consistently with the use of St. George slaying 
the dragon, a figure caught from the painting by 
Vasari which is the altar piece in Caponsacchi's 
church in Arezzo, and on which Browning plays 
so often throughout the poem. Another striking 
instance is in the important matter of the place 
where Pompilia dies, and here Browning has 
taken the responsibility upon himself for he rep- 
resents her as dying in the hospital of Santa 
Anna. There was no hospital at Santa Anna, 
and Pompilia died in her own house. But there 
are mere details, and Browning's faithfulness to 
the facts as he found them is in the main beyond 
criticism. Still, with all this faithfulness, his 
poem is, even in essence, a far different thing 
from the old yellow book. He has made the 
facts live. He says: 

"Let this old woe step upon the stage again." 
And Browning has elevated, transmuted, trans- 
figured the w'hole story. His originality is plain 
to the student in two general directions. First, 



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Page 15 



in the freedom he has used in the preparation 
of the monologues, and second, in his elabora- 
tion of the characters. In the latter Browning 
has infused more of his own soul than in any- 
thing else. 

The monologues in their present form are, of 
course, Brownings works. Some of them Half- 
Rorpe, The Other Half-Rome, and the Pope's 
soliloquy, are pure inventions and have no coun- 
terpart in the old yellow book. Others, such as 
Saponsacchi's and Pompilia's, have been gathered 
from the book and from Browning's free inven- 
tion. Still others such as the pleas of the law- 
yers Arcangeli and Bottini, are completely 
worked over and re-woven into a new tissue. 

Count Guido in Browning's poem is essenti- 
ally the real Guido of the historical case. A 
compound of cunning, greed, brutality. Yet, 
starting with such excellent material for a vil- 
lain. Browning has sublimated Guido's subtlety 
and cruelty and conceit and self sophistication. 
There is infused into him much of Browning's 
knowledge of the darkest recesses of human na- 
ture. 

In the character of Caponsacchi Browning's 
creative power has worked much more freely, 
until in his heroic and chivalrous young priest 
we hardly recognize the Canon Caponsacchi of 
the old yellow book. His affidavit when he has 
been placed on trial for elopement is included in 
the book and shows him to be a resolute man. 
And when bvertaken .with Pompilia at Castel- 
nuovo he had faced Guido with ringing words 
and so bold a front that the husband had quailed. 
But all the delicacy of feeling, heat of indigna- 
tion, sublimity of moral ideals, and depth of re- 
ligious insight which complete the character of 
Browning's Caponsacchi are borrowed from the 
personality of Robert Browning. 

Of Pompilia Browning is said to have re- 
marked: "She is just as I found her in the 
book." But the creative power of his genius 
has worked almost as extensively on her as on 
Caponsacchi. In the old yellow book she is 
either vilified by the defenders of her husband or 
spoken of patronizingly and pityingly as "poor 



child" by those who were on her side. But 
Browning has made Pompilia his ideal of woman- 
hood and motherhood — his highest embodiment 
of patience, courage and faith. It is easy to see 
that he has read into her much of his idealized 
thought of his own wife, not perhaps realizing 
how thoroughly he re-created Pompilia in the 
image of Elizabeth Barrett Browning. The 
greatest and most significant addition which 
Browning has introduced into the characters of 
Caponsacchi and Pompilia is their love for each 
other, which becomes in the poem such a tremen- 
dous dynamic force and yet is so controlled. 
This infusion into the story of a splendid pas- 
sion is the highest humanizing touch Browning 
has given in making the story live again. 

The clue to Browning's .elaboration of the 
characters, the incentive which led him on, was 
the search for adequate motives. Beyond the 
conflicting motives alleged in the old yellow book 
Browning went into a psychological study of ma- 
terials to form a conception of adequate motives 
in Guido, Caponsacchi and Pompilia to account 
for the facts lying in such a mass in the legal 
documents. Working with a wonderful sincer- 
ity and desire to be true to the facts, and yet 
with an insight into and a passionate sympathy 
with human nature which he could not violate, 
Browning has reanimated the facts in the midst 
of a pulsating tide of human life. 

The story as it stands in Browning's poem is 
told from many points of view. The various 
presentations however range themselves in two 
antagonistic lines — those favoring Count Guido 
Franceschini and those favoring Pompilia and 
Caponsacchi. These two views part company 
often in their statement of facts, and as often 
in their interpretation of facts stated alike by 
both sides. We must tell the story according to 
one side or the other, and therefore it is outlined 
here from the standpoint of Pompilia and Capon- 
sacchi. The story is as tangled as a modern 
novel and you must bear in mind how differently 
many of these things are presented by Guido and 
those who favor him. 

There was in the city of Arezzo in Tuscany, 



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SEVENTH STREET AT OLIVE 



Page 16 



The CLUBWOMAN 



a family named Franeschini, an ancient but im- 
poverished house. Two of the sons, Paul and 
Girolamo became priests, but the eldest son, 
Guide, became attached to a cardinal's suite in 
Rome and took only minor orders in the church, 
orders which would permit him to marry, his 
duty as the eldest son being to continue the 
family line. He failed in his orders for prefer- 
ment and was 46 years old when he decided to 
marry and return to the family palace at Arezzo. 
Now there was in Rome a family named 
Comparini, of the middle class having certain 
property so entailed that they could not use it 
up, and which would go to their daughter and 
her children. The father was Pietro, the mother 
Violante and the daughter Pompilia. They had 
social ambitions for their daughter, and this was 
especially true of the mother. Finally, without 
the father's consent, Pompilia was, through her 
mother's scheming, married to Count Guido 
Franceschini. When Pietro found it out he 
stormed, but presently decided there was nothing 
else to do but make the best of it, and finally 
he and his wife went to live with their daughter 
and Count Guido in Tuscany. But Guido 
turned out to be a tyrant and worse, and made 
life so disagreeable for Pietro and Violante that 
they fled and returned to Rome. Then, to spite 
Guido, they went before a court and declared 
that Pompilia was not their child, but an ille- 
gitimate child whom Violante had received from 
her dying mother. Violante had beforehand se- 
cretly made arrangements to receive this child, 
had told Pietro that he might expect a child 
of his own begetting, and had actually palmed 
this child off on her husband as her own. Vio- 
lante had kept the secret so well that Pietro 
himself never knew the truth about it until now 
when "Violante told him and they made it public 
before the court and instituted a suit for a recov- 
ery of the dowry. They did not see that this 
declaration was the very worst thing they could 
do for Pompilia. She was in no way responsible 
for her origin. Left alone in Count Guido's pal- 
ace he turned against her with hate and loathing, 
and subjected her to all torture of soul as well 



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as violence of body, and his relatives in the house 
combined with him in persecuting his wife. 
Pompilia appealed to the Governor and to the 
Archbishop, but neither of them \vould do any- 
thing to help her because of Guido's high posi- 
tion. She made several other efforts to secure 
assistance but without avail. 

Now there was in Arezzo a young priest, 
Guiseppe Caponsacchi, Canon of the church of 
Santa Maria della Pieve — also of noble birth. 
Guido plotted to bring his wife and the young 
priest together after these two had noticed each 
other in the theater. Guido's idea evidently was 
to use Caponsacchi as a means of torturing Pom- 
pilia, and to make out such a case against her 
that he might bring an accusation of adultery. 
He had married her only for money and he 
thought that if he could bring against her a well- 
supported charge of adultery he could obtain 
legal separation from her and still legally hold 
her money. Guido sent the priest letters of love 
purporting to come from Pompilia — who could 
neither read nor write, as was the case with the 
majority of women at that time. And the let- 
ters which Caponsacchi sent back declining the 
overtures were, of course, never read to Pom- 
pilia, but in their place fervent love letters writ- 
ten by Guido but purporting to come from the 
priest. 

(Continued in February Magazine) 



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JANUARY. 1926 



Page 17 



OUR HERITAGE 

By Mrs. F. T. Bicknell, President Emeritus Los Ayiffeles Audubon Society 



The reforestation movement which is being so vig- 
orously sponsored by the American Reforestation As- 
sociation and similar organizations, is as vital to the 
vpild life of our country as to its tree life, for the 
forest is the natural habitat for all wild life. Its 
refuges and sanctuaries are the homes and breeding 
places of many species of birds and animals. 

Its open spaces their playgrounds. Those sponsor- 
ing one, should work for all. Conservation is an 
illuminating subject of many phases — some one of 
which appeals to every class. Science, health, recrea- 
tion, aesthetics, spiritual uplift, monetary value, physi- 
cal existence, all are embraced within that magic 
word. 

If Nature were left to herself without the destruc- 
tive interference of man, our forests, insects, birds 
and wild life would work out their own salvation, 
feeding upon, yet preserving one another, with our 
forests the "Nature Mother" of them all. 

The cause of birds is not a new one. Moses advo- 
cated bird protection. Solomon marked the seasons 
by the time of the singing birds. Aristotle wrote the 
first preserved records of bird life. Pliny describes 
the eagle. David saw a picture of trusting love in 
the parent bird's sheltering care of her young. It has 
only been within the last few years that it has seemed 
necessary to determine the economic value of birds 
and to formulate laws for their protection and estab- 
lish sanctuaries for their breeding places. With the 



development of a country, its wild life necessarily 
decreases; but woe to the country which wantonly 
exterminates any part of its natural resources! The 
Migratory Bird Law and Treaty with Canada are 
the greatest steps the United States has thus far taken 
for bird protection. These were initiated by the Au- 
dubon Society — the first organization to sponsor the 
cause of birds and wild life. A movement is now on 
foot to establish resting and feeding stations for the 
migratory birds in their flight across the country. 

With their natural feeding grounds developed into 
fields of waving grain and the licensed hunter's gun 
ever pointed their way, our game and song birds are 
rapidly disappearing. 

Bird Values 

With the decrease in insectivorous birds comes the 
increase in insect life. Not until the voter — the tax- 
payer and the law-maker learn that birds are one of 
Nature's important agencies for keeping down the 
hordes of injurious insects — that for every quart of 
fruit the Blackheaded Grosbeak takes he eats more 
than three pints of black olive scales, over a quart 
or flower beetles besides a generous supply of canker 
worms and the pupae of the codling moth, and that 
a Flicker will eat from 3000 to 7000 ants at a single 
meal ; that the tiny Bush-Tits feed their young 2000 
insects daily; that the Swallow combs the air of over 
1000 winged insects per day; that the Brewer Black- 
birds are constantly destroying wire-worms, cut- 




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Kling Manufacturing Co., Los Angeles 



Page 18 



The CLUBWOMAN 



worms and T^hite grubs in your lawns and fields and 
that the Mockingbird has already paid for the fruit 
he takes from our fig trees by eating the thousands of 
insects which would have destroyed the fruit in the 
bud ; how the Hawks by day and Owls by night prey 
constantly upon ground squirrels, rats and mice and 
how the Meadowlark not only gladdens the world 
with its sweet song, but eats over a quart of insects 
per days, including the grasshoppers, crickets, beetles 
and weevils, not until these men know these facts 
will they begin to realize that birds have an economic 
value and merit protection. 

The Biological Survey of the United States De- 
partment of Agriculture, which has fully established 
the economic value of our birds, claims that insects 
cause an annual loss of $800,000,000 to the agricul- 
tural interests of the United States, and Harris A. 
Reynolds, secretary of Massachusetts Forestry Asso- 
ciation, says the ravages of insect pests cost the 
farmers, orchardists and timber owners $1,000,000,000 
a day in this country, increasing the cost of food and 
clothing for all of us. Through the Biological Survey 
we find that .75 per cent of our birds are wholly 
beneficial, that .13 per cent are chiefly beneficial, that 
.05 per cent are neutral and only .04 per cent are 
harmful and that no species is so haiT.iful as to war- 
rant its extermination. Mr. Reynolds also says the 
insectivorous birds are of even greater economic 
value than game, for if it were not for their assist- 
ance we would be overr.m with insect pests. 
Timber Pests 

Over 8,000,000 acres of timber-lands are destroyed 
annually by insects. Every tree and every plant has 
its insect enemy; but through the wise provision of 
Nature, every kind of insect is a choice tid-bit for a 
certain species of bird. During the Winter months 
the forests are searched for hibernating insects, their 
eggs and larvae by the Woodpeckers, Nuthatches, 
Creepers, Titmice, and Chickadees. In the Spring as 
the buds open, and grubs and caterpillars emerge, the 
Thrushes, Warblers, Vireos and Kinglets sweep down 
upon them, destroying .90 per ceijt of them before they 
are large enough to do much damage. Then come 
Summer breeding birds for food for their young and 
Autumn with its special army of migratory birds for 
the "left over" worms and bugs, and thus by con- 
tinual attacks, the undue increase in insect life is 
held in check except on rare occasions. Without birds 
there would be no tree or plant life and without 
plant life there would be no animal life. 

Those are Nature's laws. Conservation of wild life 
is gaining in favor among tne »nlightened class who 
read and think; but with the ignorant, the bigoted, 
and the law breaker in our midst, the situation calls 
for the vigorous and unceasing measures and the 
combined efforts of all true Americans if any portion 
of our wild life shall revert to posterity. Our fore- 
f.ithers braved the wilderness and our grandfathers 
preserved the natural resources for the coming gen- 
erations. Have we a right to destroy and squander 
this vast and rich heritage. In the schools the chil- 
dren are taught to be kind to all living creatures; 
but through adult organizations must come the im- 
mediate action ! 

We turn to the women's clubs — that great federa- 
tion of organized motherhood, for mature compre- 
hension and quick response to help solve this economic 
yet aesthetic and spiritually uplifting problem. 
California's Paradise 

It means health for your growing children, outdoor 
recreation for your over-burdened husbands, spiritual 
jplift to your own tired hearts and the .future preser- 
vation of your homes. 

Every club in the federation shouKl have a con- 
servation section to study Nature and her myriad 
attractions, to know the meaning and usefulness of 




^ Mrs. Frederick T. Blcknell 

our country's vast heritage and realize why it should 
be preserved. California is Nature's Paradise with 
its own native trees, birds and wild flowers not found 
elsewhere. 

Shall we make it our "job" to keep it a Paradise 
for our own enjoyment and for the education and 
joy of future generations or shall our selfish indiffer- 
ence and blind optimism thwart the plans of the 
Supreme Being and our beautiful California become 
a treeless, birdless and flowerless desert waste? Let 
other States work out their own salvation, but let us 
in California be among the first ranks in preserving 
the natural beauty and wild life of our portion of the 
United States ! 



WOMAN'S CLUB OF INDIO 

By Mrs. B. S. Boyer 

After a summer vacation, not devoid of work for 
the Executive Board, the Woman's Club of Indio is 
looking forward to a pleasant and profitable year, 
under the efficient leadership of the new president, 
Mrs. A. L. Wood. At the first meeting, held October 
7, our president spoke about the much needed kitchen 
that was built during the summer and other plans re- 
lative to the year's work. A kitchen shower will be 
an interesting event at the next meeting and at this 
time window draperi'es will be added to the clubroom. 

The club expects to do as much work as possible 
along federation lines in addition to local community, 
civic and social affairs. The new year book outlines 
a variety of good programs, book reviews. 

A branch of the Riverside Library, cared for by our 
Library Committee, is patronized and appreciated by 
many of our citizens. The "Penny March," which we 
sometimes make a "Silver March," is given between 
the business session and the program. It affords a 
little recreation and sociability and provides a small 
sum for the building fund. 



JANUARY, 1926 



Page 19 



THE WOMEN'S UNIVERSITY CLUB 

By Iva B.' Duer, Press Chairman 



December is proving to be a month of varied 
interest to the members and guests of the Wo- 
men's Universit}^ Club. The calendar for the 
month gjve much in anticipation but the pleas- 
ure and profit realized from the different events 
could not have been greater. 

Luncheon was served at the Club house the 
first Saturday of the month as usual. Then 
the club adjourned to the Trinity' Auditorium 
to hear the speaker of the day. 

By splendid co-operation with Miss Lloy Gal- 
pin, president of the High School Teachers' As- 
sociation and Miss Gladys Moorhead, presi- 
dent of the C\t\ Teachers' Club, the Women's 
University Club was able to secure Albert E. 
Wiggam, the philosopher-scientist for a lecture. 

Albert E. Wiggam is the outstanding writer 
of non-fiction today. His books the past year 
have been the best sellers in that class Those 
who had read his books "The Decalogue of 
Science" and "The Fruit of the Family Tree" 
could anticipate his line of argument on the 
subject of "What Civilization is Doing to Us." 

There are three great world possibilities ahead, 
he says. 

First: Civilization may be destroyed, blotted 
out as was well nigh done in 1914. — May the 
Locarno Treaty place this event into the future. 

Second : A long period of social and political 
muddling — ^with hell around the corner. 

Third : Mankind may apply human intelli- 
gence to human afifairs. This is a thing that 



has never been tried. 

The optimist cannot aid in this work, nor 
the pessimist ; the conservative nor the radical. 
The optimist politician believes that a silk purse 
can be made from a sow's ear. The pessimist 
when confronted by two evils chooses both. The 
conservative believes that nothing should be done 
for the first time ; the radical that nothing should 
be done except for the first time. 

But the New Liberal can aid. The New 
Liberal tackles social, educational and religious 
problems just as he would tackle work on his 
automobile. He applies scientific methods. He 
uses the right tools and the right application of 
these tools. 

The question then is what scientific civiliza- 
tion will do to man. Will science enable man to 
build a civilization that will force civilization 
upward or in the opposite direction? This is 
the problem of the social engineer ^vhose objec- 
tive is race improvement. 

Again through the courtesy of the High 
School Teachers' Association, the club was priv- 
ileged to enjoy Mrs. Grace Hazard Conklin as 
the luncheon speaker Tuesday, December 15. 
Mrs. Conklin is a poet-lecturer and a profes- 
sor at Smith College. 

Mrs. Larrabee, president of the Women's Uni- 
versity Club, presided at the guest table. Among 
the guests of honor were Miss Ethel Norton, 
president of the Smith Club, Miss Lloy Galpin, 
president of the High School Teachers' Asso- 



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Page 20 



The CLUBWOMAN 




Carmel by the Sea and Point Lobos. By William Ritschel, N. A. 



ciation, Miss Gladys Moorhead, president of 
the City Teachers' Club, Mrs. de Graffenreid, 
president of the Kindergarten Teachers' Club, 
and Mr. Kuehne, president of the Elementary 
Principals' Club. 

Mrs. Conklin delighted the luncheon guests 
by reading poems written by children, some of 
them written by her own daughter, Hilda. Mrs. 
Conklin feels that poetical expression is natural 
to childhood and the problem is to let it blos- 
som naturally. She cited gems which her little 
daughter had uttered at the age of four. Many 
of the poetical utterances through the 3'ears 
were kept by the mother and a collection of 
them was published when the child was twelve 
years old. This was unknown to Hilda until 
the volume was placed in her hands. 

Upon the memory of those present at the 
dinner December 10, a rare pleasure is indelibly 
fixed. It was a California evening in honor of 
the seventy-fifth anniversary of the admission of 
California into the Union. One hundred and 
thirty guests were present. A Mexican dinner 
was served by "Mrs. Charles F. Turner, assisted 
by Mrs. George C. DeGarmo and Mrs. Birney 
Donnell. A group of club members acted as 
waitresses under the direction of Mrs. James 
Woods. 



The program was in charge of the Drama Sec- 
tion. A fitting atmosphere was created by the 
gray-clad Mission father removing the Indian 
rugs and baskets and the caballero replacing 
them with Spanish shawls. A group of Indian 
songs composed by Homer Grunn was sung by 
Miss Margery Thomas, accompanied by Miss 
May Taylor. The Spanish dance was by Miss 
Alice Corwin. She was accompanied by the 
speaker of the evening for having chosen for 
her costume for the beautiful dance the Spanish 
shawl and long skirt instead of the bolero, short 
skirt and betasscled hat that bespeak the period 
after 1820, the period of the open saloon. 

Mrs. Florence Dodson Schoneman, president 
of the California Landmarks Club fascinated 
the guests by reminiscences of early California 
under the title "what My Parents and I Re- 
member of Early California." Not less pleas- 
ure did the gentle though regal presence of 
Senofa Dodson, Mrs. Schoneman's mother, give 
to those present. Senora Dodson was clad in 
the Spanish costume she wore at the Jubilee 
Celebration in San Francisco last fall for which 
she received the first prize. The lace mantilla 
of the costume has been worn by brides of her 
family for two hundred years. Mention was 
made of their custom of placing a basket of 



JANU.JRY, 1926 



Page 21 



gold coins in the guest chamber. From this 
basket guests were at liberty to supply their 
needs to continue their journey. The three days 
journey from their rancho (San Pedro) to the 
pueblo of Los Angeles in the childhood of Mrs. 
Schoneman is explained by the fact that there 
were three ranches betsveen and each rancho de- 
manded a night's visit. What the life of John 
Temple, or Don Juan Temple as he was styled, 
meant to early Los Angeles was reviewed and 
the attempt to change the present name of Tem- 
ple street was spoken of. Of the streets Faith, 
Hope and Charity only Hope remains! Mrs. 
Schoneman is assisting in revising the Harris 
Newmark book, "Sixty Years in California." 

Miss Katherine Carr entertained the follow- 
ing guests who have lived in California more 
than forty years: Mrs. Margaret Frick, Mrs. 
Frank Gibson, Mr. and Mrs. William Spauld- 
ing. Mr. and Mrs. Sam Kreider, Mrs. May 
Reynolds and Mrs. Sarah Bixby Smith. 

At the Drama Section Miss Florence B. Hub- 
bard gave a review of the Burns Mantle Edi- 
tion of the ten best plays of 1924-1925. With 
consumate economy of words Miss Hubbard 
gave a finished review and read several scenes 
in illustration. 



/-^M^K/^z-^n^'^V^/^K/^n/^n/^ 



HIGHLAND PARK EBELL 
CLUB 

By Mrs. George F. Cook, Press Chairman 
In recognition of California Diamond Jubilee 
year, a series of exceptional musical programs 
was scheduled for the three morning sessions 
of the holiday month at Highland Park Ebell 
club. 

The first program of the series was given by 
Katherine Von Blon, soprano, singer of the 
genree song; Raymond McFeeters, pianist ac- 
companist and the Norma Gould dancers \vith 
Nan Chapman at the piano. 

Mrs. Von Blon's entire program was of Span- 
ish songs from several composers. The dra- 
matic ability of the singer was enhanced by her 
gorgeous Spanish costumes in the first two groups 
of songs and in the last group she wore a cos- 
tume of marvelous white. In response to re- 
peated applause ^Irs. Von Blon sand "La Pa- 
loma" and "La Golondrina" as encores. 

Raymond ^IcFeeters' ability as a pianist is 
of superior quality, and he is well known 
through his broadcasting at frequent times. 

The Norma Gould Dancers gave several su- 
f)erb interpretive dances. 

After a special Christmas luncheon, prepared 
by Mrs. H. L. L^nderhill and committee. Miss 
Gertrude Darlon was given a heart)" welcome, 
and introduced by Mrs. Dan Hammock, curator 
of the Literature section. Of great interest were 
the sketches of present day literature reviewed 




Soon— 

Our 

Move! 



rESS than a month 
now we will be in our 
new building, 7th Street, 
Flower and Figueroa 
eager to welcome old 
friends and new to this 
new "home of better 
Homes." 

In the meantime in our 
present building the RE- 
MOVAL SALE offers 
newly impressive values 
on every ty^e of furnish- 
ing for the home. 



BARKER BROS. 

COMPLETE FURNISHERS OP SUCCESSFUL HOMES 
BROADWAY BETWEEN SEVENTH AND EIGHTH 






'¥ 
^ 
> 
^ 
> 
^ 
^ 
> 
> 
> 
^ 
> 
^ 
> 



^^^•^^^It^^^N^t^SJi^^^^^^^^^^r^^^ 



Page 22 



The CLUBWOMAN 




Daniel In the Lions Den. Ry Henry O. Tanner, A. N. A. 



by Miss Darlon. 

At the American Citi^ienship section, Airs. 
Clarence Shults, curator, led in an interesting 
discussion of several chapters of Raj'mond Get- 
tell's book on the Constitution. 

The second musicale of the Jubilee series in- 
cluded Marian Andrews, soprano ; Elsie Manion, 
violin and Evelyn Kemp, piano ; known as the 
Marian Andrews Trio. 

Choice selections were presented with ar- 
tistry, and were received with appreciation by 
the large audience. 

A glad ^welcome was given Miss Winifred 
Rouzee at the Bible section of which Mrs. Mary 
D. Howard is curator. Miss Rouzee discussed 
specially the Book of Ruth, a pastoral drama of 
four chapters, which she said is identified with 
^yDrld events of today. 

The third recital of the Jubilee series oc- 
curred on the regular Public Affairs day, of 
which Mrs. John H. Foley is chairman. 

Ensemble singing of Christmas songs was led 
by Mrs. J. E. Gribble with Mrs. Loye Holmes 
Miller at the piano. Mrs. Dessa H. M. Fultz 
read her own story, "The First Christmas Tree" 
and Mrs. R. W. Snell, curator of the Drama 
section, read Ruth McEnery Stuart's "Christmas 
at the Grimbles." Soprano solos were sung bv 
Mrs. J. E. Gribble and Mrs. Charles Oden, 
both of whom are favorites in the musical 
world. Frank Geiger, well known bass, gave 



several delightful selections. Dr. and Mrs. J. 
"L. Leavel delighted the large audience with old 
fashioned songs. The program was the generous 
gift of members of the club and relatives of mem- 
bers, Mr. Frank Geiger being a brother of Mrs. 
Luella Avery and Mrs. O. J. Hill, members 
of the club and Dr. and Mrs. Leavel being 
parents of Mrs. J. S. Davis, a club member. 

At the music section, Mrs. Harry E. Fisher, 
curator, continued her splendid talks on na- 
tionality in music, with appropriate illustrations. 

An apron sale was held on two Tuesday's 
at the clubhouse, through which there was an 
increase of funds for the Ways and Means Com- 
mittee. 

Christmas stockings were prepared by the 
Rambler section for the Southern California 
Home for Aged Women. Mrs. Samuel Weston 
Hastings and Mrs. E. B. Machlin are curators 
of the Rambler section. 



HISTORY AND LANDMARKS 
CLUB 

By E. M. T'nncrhoff , Press Chairman 

"The hope of America is reforestation and 
the hope of reforestation lies in the women of 
America, "avers Mr. G. H. Barnes, president of 
American Reforestation, speaking before the Cal- 
ifornia History and Landmarks Club November 
17. "It is to the women we look for the crys- 



JANUARY, 1926 



Page 23 



tallization of public opinion needed to arrest the 
Federal government and enlist its powers in the 
solving of our water problems." He went on 
to say "Trees are the mothers of the rivers and 
deserts are direct results of non-conservation. 
All the United States will soon be on water ra- 
tions ; conser^-ation is not enough since twenty- 
five years more will use up all available facili- 
ties; reforestation must be stressed." Mr. Barnes 
cited forty-four different states in trouble over 
the need of water. Twenty-five seed trees of 
the South have been wiped out by fire and other 
adversities. Forty-three counties in Te.\as are 
involved ; Minnehaha Falls are gone ; for seven- 
teen weeks Colorado suffered. The value of edu- 
cation is seen in the great reduction of forest 
fires since last year. "The educational cam- 
paign must go on through the women, and re- 
forestation must be put in practical use." 

The California History and Landmarks Club, 
led by Mrs. Florence Dodson Schoneman, presi- 
dent, and Mrs. A. S. C. Forbes, president emeri- 
tus is actively working for the preservation of 
historical names which dignify Los Angeles 
streets. The twenty-second, at San Fernando, a 
•ivonderful bronze of Fray Junipero Serra was 
unveiled by reason of efforts of these and other 
interested folk. An added historical beauty for 
the Memory Garden because of mutual loyalty 
to the founders of this coast. The promotion 
of this testimonial was the direct work of ^Irs. 
Forbes, and one of the special speakers called to 
the platform by John S. ilcGroarty, was Mrs. 
Schoneman, representative of the old aristocracy. 

On December 17, at the Ebell clubhouse, the 
program included Mrs. H. W. Wellington of 
the California Hut, speaking on the work of the 
Disabled Veterans; the reading of a testimonial 
to the San Fernando ceremonies of the Novem- 
ber 22nd by the press chairman ; Mrs. Catherine 
O'Brien, chairman of History and Landmarks 
for the Catholic Woman's Club, speaking on 
the "Life of Father Junipero Serra." The pro- 
gram closed with a group of Spanish songs in- 
terpreted bv Senorita Elena Castello, of ^lexico 
Ciri-. 

For an hour before the program Mrs. Wel- 
lington and Miss Georgia Sinclair, the new 
chairman of Co-operation with War Veterans, 
held a reception for the veterans, during which 
the work of disabled veterans was displayed, and 
Miss Sinclair received the donation of jelly and 
jam for the Christmas Shower that is to be the 
club's part in Christmas cheer at the Veteran 
Children's Lodge, Sawtelle, December 23. Miss 
Georgia Sinclair is the appointee of Mrs. Henry 
T. Wright, District chairman of Co-operation 
with War Veterans and assisted by Miss Isabel 
Fraters, vice chairman, and the 3'oung women 
of the Auxilliarv of the Catholic Woman's 
Club. 



THE WOMEN'S TWENTIETH 

CENTURY CLUB OF 

EAGLE ROCK 

By Mrs. JVardeji Woolard, Press Chairman 

The Women's Twentieth Century Club of 
Eagle Rock has seen a particularly interesting 
and varied program worked out by the different 
sections for the year to date. The work has been 
so many-sided and well balanced that it is dif- 
ficult to decide if any department deserves higher 
praise than another. 

Probably the most appealing from a mother's 
point of view is the work being done by the 
Child Welfare Section. Realizing that com- 
munity progress depends a great deal on the 
physical well-being of its future citizens, the 
children, this section has opened part of its work 
to outsiders as well as to club members. Dr. 
Josephine Piatt and her staff of nurses hold a 
baby clinic every Friday morning from 9:30 to 
1 1 :30 in the dining room of the clubhouse at 
which babies up to two years of age are ex- 
amined free of charge. For club members. Dr. 
Maud Wilde, president of the Mother's Edu- 
cational Center Association of Los Angeles, is 
conducting a course in Paidolog\' at 1 :30 the 
second Monday of every month at the clubhouse. 
At the end of the year, examinations will be 
held and diplomas awarded to students com- 
pleting the course, although this examination is 
optional with the students. , Dr. William Key 
has been directing the division on Posture and 
Growth; Mrs. Walden Mulier, Mental Exam- 
inations; Dr. Wilde, Character Building and 
Conduct. Dr. Wilde has lectured on, "Prepara- 
tion for Motherhood," "Birth Control," and 
"Maternal Impressions." 

The Occidental Scholarship Committee has 
been adding to its funds so that there can be no 
danger of the scholarship lapsing. At present 
the club has one young woman in college to 
whom it loans $200 a year and hopes before very 
long to be able to help another one. 

The Music section gave an "Old Fashioned 
Concert" in the auditorium of the Central 
School, December 3, which attracted a record au- 
dience. Demure little Dollv Varden maidens wel- 



Gleason's Parliamentary Digest 

Commencing in January, Mrs. I. W. Gleason will 
conduct afternoon and evening classes in Parlia- 
mentary Law at her own home, 1110 W. 30th 
St., Los Angeles, California. Membership limited. 

If you wish to take advantage of these classes 
write Mrs. Gleason or phone BEacon 2894. 

Send orders for Digests to 

GLEASOWS PARLIAMENTARY DIGEST 

mow. 30th St., Los Angeles, California 
Cloth Cover Digest, $2; Paper Cover Digest, $1.50 
Special prices on Large R-U-S-D-A-M-V-R-O-A 
Charts during the months of January and February 



Page 24 



The CLUBWOMAN 



corned the guests, and a grandfathers clock, spin- 
ning wheel, and like furniture of the time, trans- 
formed the stage into a mid-Victorian room. In 
this room, famous personages of by-gone days in 
quaint costumes made their calls and sang old 
time melodies. 

Mrs. W. B. Hunnewell of the faculty of the 
University of California, Southern Branch, is 
presenting a series of lecture recitals for the 
Drama department every third Thursday at 
2:30, in the clubhouse. Elizabeth Cloud Mil- 
ler has also given three very interesting read- 
ings to this section. Those wishing to get the 
benefits of these meetings and not members of 
the club may do so on the payment of 25 cents 
for each meeting. On the fourth Thursday in 
January, the Drama section will present a play 
as the program for the club day. 

The social side of life has not been over- 
looked in all of this activity and the club has a 
very successful Hallowe'en party, a card party, 
and a children's Christmas party to its credit. 
At the Christmas party, the little guests brought 
toys, old or new, to be given as presents to the 
children of disabled veterans. A wonderful din- 
ner dance open to the public has been planned 
for New Year's Eve. The comittee in charge has 
made reservations for 150 people and practically 
all of these have been taken. To insure its suc- 
cess, they secured the Turner caterers of Pasa- 
dena, and the Gay Orchestra. 



LOS ANGELES CITY 
TEACHERS' CLUB 

By Ann Davis Clark, Press Chairman 

Under the leadership of the new president, 
Miss Gladys Evelyn Moorhead, the Los Angeles 
City Teachers' Club is looking forward to a year 
of great activity along social, legislative and edu- 
cational lines. 

The club is initiating an intensive study of 
needs for future educational and social legisla- 
tion. Close co-operation is contemplated with the 
legislative committees of the Federation of Wom- 
en's Clubs and of the League of Women Voters. 
Effort along lines of international relations was 
mitiated by lectures and referendum vote on the 
World Court, and will be continued through as- 
sociation with the Council of International Re- 
lations. 

The Los Angeles City Teachers' Club gave 
its annual luncheon during Institute week at the 
Hiltmore Hotel. This is the outstanding social 
event of the year and was attended by about 
five hundred members and guests. Among the 
guests were Mrs. Susan M. Dorsey, Mrs. George 
Herbert Clark, Mrs. James Birney Lorbeer, 
-Mrs. H«len Mathewson Laughlin, Miss Lloy 
Galpin, Mrs. Gertrude De Graffenried, Mr. R. 
W. Pridham, Mr. Mark Keppel, Mr. Menno 



Kuehney. Adolf Tandler furnished an enjoy- 
able musical program and a noteworthy address 
was delivered by Dr. L. D. Coffman, president 
of the University of Minnesota. 

Enlargement of the recreational activities of 
Club members will include a new swimming 
club ; also a hiking club with headquarters at the 
Teachers' Club's mountain cabin in the Santa 
Anita Canon. A series of bi-monthly teas has 
been inaugurated at the Club Rooms in the- 
Trinity building, recently re-decorated for this 
year. 

An important social event was the tea given 
on December 28, in honor of Mrs. George Her- 
bert Clark of the Board of Education. 

At the request of Mrs. Alfred Graham, Chair- 
man of the Committee on Motion Pictures of 
the District P'ederation of Women's Clubs, the 
Board of Directors of the Teachers' Club are co- 
operating in the study of suitable films for 
children. 



KATE TUPPER GALPIN 
SHAKESPEARE CLUB 

By Mrs. Elizabeth C. Fisher, Press Chairman 

The pre-holiday meeting of the Galpin Shakes- 
peare Club, which took place on Saturday, De- 
cember 19, at the Women's University Club, 
opened with a luncheon served in the club din- 
ing room. 

The afternoon program was prefaced with a 
brief address by the president, Mrs. H. C. 
Bender, who reminded us that while gifts may 
be specially suitable at the season of the Na- 
tivity, kindness, consideration and understand- 
ing are due to others throughout the year. 

Miss Madeline Bridges gave a solo — rriost ap- 
propriate for California at this season of the 
year — the "Rain Song." She was accompanied 
by Mrs. Paul Kinsey. 

Mrs. Robert Robinson, who had genei:al 
charge of the program, made a modest little 
speech in which she disclaimed credit for the 
original play about to be given, saying that Mrs. 
Bender suggested the idea and Mrs. Claude 
Kesler put it into concrete form. 

As the subject of the day was the relation be- 
tween employers and employes, Mrs. Robinson 
quoted from the Biblical book of Ruth, the 
greeting of the wealthy farmer Boaz to his 
reapers, "The Lord be With You!" and their 
reply, "The Lord Bless Thee!" She said that 
if these thoughts on both side could only ani- 
mate all work, there would be little friction in 
the industrial world. 

Two duets, "Pale Moon" and "Gypsy Trail" 
were rendered by Miss Bridges and Miss Helen 
Gaddes. 

Mrs. R. W. Boyesen gave a reading from 
Cymbeline, Act III, Scene IV — it seemed good 
to hear an unhackneyed selection from our au- 



JANUARY, 1926 



Page 25 



thor — showing the loyalty of the old servant 
Pisanio to Imogene and her unwillingness to get 
him into trouble. 

Then followed the first part of the original 
play, which showed a bad spirit of lack of co- 
operation in a milliner's shop. Mrs. Claude Kes- 
ler, who represented the tactless and disagreeable 
head of the business, had as her assistants Mrs. 
B. A. Snow, Mrs. A. H. McClain, Airs. L. W. 
Webb, Mrs. Utilia Brilpin, Miss Webb and 
Miss Fannie Smith. Snobbishness in the em- 
ployer, producing hatefulness in the employed 
was the point of this portion of the play. 

There was then a return to Shakespeare and 
a scene from "Anthony and Cleopatra" was 
acted by Miss Sarah Reese, Miss Fannie Smith 
and Mrs. McClain. 

The cruelty possible in Cleopatra's day to- 
ward a messenger whose only fault is that he 
brings bad news has been finely depicted by our 
author. 

A dialogue from "Timon of Athens" between 
the over-generous Timon and his devoted stew- 
ard was given by Mrs. George Roth and Mrs. 
L. K. Dodson and brought out a different type 
of loving service from the one shown in the 
reading from "Cymbeline." One shows faith- 
fulness in money matters, the other willingness 
to risk severe punishment, perhaps even life 
itself. 



A scene from the "Merchant of Venice" 
showing the pleasant relations between Portia 
the great heiress and her temporary caretaker 
Ixirenzo, was given by Mrs. J. T. Fitzgerald. 
Mrs. George Freeman, Mrs. Snow and Miss 
Edith Wiggs. 

The charming bit from "Julius Caesar", which 
lepresents Brutus as considerate of his servant 
lad was acted by Mrs. W. E. Silverwood, Miss 
Ermajane Cole and Mrs. Webb. 

This concluded the Shakesperean portion of 
the program, which ended with a second part 
of the original play showing the milliner in a 
kindlier mood and some of her helpers coming 
to her assistance in the Christmas crisis. 



GLEASON PARLIAMENTARY 
CLUB 

By Mrs. Sibyl Murcliison, Press Chairman 
Mrs. W. E. Bruce entertained the Gleason 
Parliamentary Club on their fifth birthday an- 
niversary, October 17, at a beautifully appointed 
luncheon in her home at the Castle Green Apart- 
ments in Pasadena. The luncheon was served in 
the green and gold dining room, these being the 
club colors. The table decorations were of the 
same shade, and green and yellow flowers were 
banked in profusion here, as well as in Mrs. 
Bruce's apartment. 

Five candles were used in the table decora- 



H^ith 3C 

You can Overcome The 

Handicaps To Skin and Hair 

of the Hard Alkali Water in 

This Country. 

3C is the Modern, Conven- 
ient City Equivalent To 
Putting Out a Wash Tub To 
Catch Rain Water For a 
Shampoo. 



COMFORT 




Chemical 



Also Means 

CLEANLINESS 



You Can Buy 3C At These 

Places— 

LOS ANGELES 

A. & O. 

Broadway Department Store 

The May Co. 

HOLLYWOOD 

Carty Bros. 

FLINTRIDGE 

Flintridge Grocery Co. 

BEVERLY HILLS 

R. P. O'Connor 

PASADENA 

F. C. Nash Co. 

The Model Grocery 

LONG BEACH 

The Wall Co. 

RIVERSIDE 

C. F. Elder 

Alfred M. Lewis 

Sweet Grocery Co, 



CHARM 



If you will use 3C in the water whenever you wash, your friends from the East can no longer 
say "This water is dreadfully hard on your skin, isn't it. my dear?" 

It is a perfect water softener and can be used with your favorite soap for bath or shampoo. 
A little in a glass of water absolutely cleans your rings. 

you Can Buy 3C At These Places 



SAN BERNARDINO 

McNeil's Grocery 

Golden Rule 

Bates Grocery 

ARCADIA 

Shular Bros. 



MONTROSE 
Hoffman- Fowler 

MONROVIA 
Kellar Grocery Co. 

SIERRA MADRE 
T. Salury 



ALTADENA 
Altadena Grocery Store 

. TORRENCE 
Paige's 
WATTS 
G. J. Burger 



MONETA 

R. W. Ahlberg 

GLENDALE 

All Grocery Stores 

COLTON 

Ma gills 

Burton-Powell Co. 



Page"2b 



The CLUBWOMAN 





Intereilinff Interior of Cumnock School for Girls 
Photo by L. Bixby-Smith 



SCHOOL NOTES 
By Jean B. Kentle 

The formal dedication and open house for the new 
home of Pacific Military Academy was held recently 
with fitting ceremonies. More than five hundred in- 
vited guests attended, inspected the buildings and re- 
mained for dinner in the mess hall. Mr. Benjamin F. 
Bledsoe, Mr. Harry H. Culver and Mr. Charles E. 
Lindblade gave inspiring talks and paid wonderful 
tributes to Mrs. Catherine Loughan, the managing 
director, for her untiring courage and fine purpose. 
Mrs. Loughan has quite recovered from her illness 
of the summer and was a charming hostess at the re- 
ception. A special entertainment was provided, fol- 
lowed by carols under the Christmas Tree in the 
patio of the school. 

A delightful Christmas party preceded the closing 
of school for the holidays at Kenwood Hall. A charm- 
ingly presented play, "The Spirit of Yuletide," was 
given and a program of French songs, poems, stories 
and solos vras followed by the appearance of Santa 
Claus, who distributed gifts to all. The program 
was under the direction of Miss Chrisabelle Brown. 



Each year students of the school provide Christmas 
cheer for a family less fortunate, giving a tree, food 
and gifts. 

Urban Military Academy formally opened the new 
tile swimming pool with the following notables giv- 
ing exhibitions: Duke Kahanamoku, the world's great- 
est swimmer, Betty Becker Pinkston, Olympic diving 
champion 1924, and Dorothy Poynton, 10 year old 
world's diving champion. 

An Old English Christmas was celebrated at West- 
lake School for Girls with the ceremony of bringing 
in the Yule Log, the Boar's Head, and a delightfully 
arranged program called Yuletide Revels, with Miss 
Ethel Jacoby, as Seneschal. 



TO OUR PRESS CHAIRMEN 



Articles not appearing in November issue 
of the Clubwoman, are being held for our next 
issue because of lack of space. 



CAROLINE DUNCAN 



Studio Open October ! 
Classed in Public Speaking and all 
Dramatic Art. 



forms of 



1622 Crenshaw Boulevard 



EMpire 6360 



SECRETARIAL 
COACHING 

For cultured people desiring personal attention 
Refined, harmonious surroundings. All Secretarial 
subjects. Enter at any time. Management, Mrs. 
Frank Rutherford. 711 S. Vermont Ave. FI 1763. 



WESTLAKE SCHOOL 

FOR GIRLS 

Resident and Day School 
333 S. Westmoreland Ave. Los Angeles 



KENWOOD HALL 

Resident and day school for girls. Sub-primary 
through High School. Spanish, French, Expres- 
sion. Dancing included in regular tuition. 675 
S. Vermont Ave., Los Angeles. WAshington 1612. 



JANUARY. 1926 



Page 21 



SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 

As a result of persona! inquiry The Clubwoman takes pleasure in commending to California 
clubwomen the schools whose announcements appear in The Clubwoman. 



NEWLY LOCATED IN GLENDORA 
FOOTHILLS 

(girls' CollegiatE ^ctjool 

Day and Boarding School 
Thirty-fourth year. Accredited East and 
West. New Buildings. Miss Parsons and 
Miss Dennen, Principals. Tel. Glendora 
44783. City office — "Ask Mr. Foster." 

Information Service Robinson's Dept. 

Store, 7th St. and Grand Ave. Tel. BR. 
4701. 

Cumnock ^cI)ooI 

Thirty-First Year 
School of Expression, Academy. Junior School 

Complete courses in 
Vocal Interpretation of Art 

Literature Public Speaking 

Literary Appreciation Journalism 

Story-Telling Story Writing 

Voice and Diction Dramatic Art 

Aesthetic Dancing 

HELEN A. BROOKS, Director 
5353 West Third Street 
GRanite 3253 
CRanite 3353 Los Angeles 



University of Southern California 

Bulletins with full description of 

courses on application 

Address Registrar 

University of Southern California 
35th and University Ave. Los Angeles 



ELLIOTT SCHOOL 

FOR GIRLS 

Residence and Day School. Sub-Primary 
through Eleventh Grade. Ideal Home 
Life. Character Building. Superior Edu- 
cational Advantages. Out-Door Classes. 
MARTHA COLLINS WEAVER, Principal, 
Gramercy Place at Pico Blvd., Los Angeles 



"The Coming West Point of the West" 

San Diego Army & Navy 
Academy 

The Academy enjoys the highest Scholastic rat- 
ing of the Univ. of Calif. — "Division A." It is 
under Government supervision. It emphasizes 
Christian Character Training. Address for infor- 
mation Col. Thos. A. Davis, Pres. Pacific Beach, 
Calif, 



JJlarlborougf) ^cfjool for (gicls 

S029 W. 3rd St. Los Angeles 

Boarding and Day School 

Accredited to Eastern and Western 

Colleges 

36th Term— 1925. 
Ada S. Blake, A. B., Principal 



PAGE MILITARY ACADEMY 

A BIG SCHOOL FOB LITTLE BOYS 

The largest of Its cJass In America. Everything adapted 
te meet the needs of the smaller boy. Ftve fireproof 
buildings; Beven-acre campus; seventeen resident teachers. 
Here a boy Is taught self-reliance. Through military 
training he acquires habits of exactness, the spirit of 
team work and co-operation and also energy and Initia- 
tive — the best preparation for life, no matter what pro- 
fession he may follovr. Let our Catalogue .tell you all 
about our school. ■ i 

ROBERT A. GIBBS. Headmaster 

1257 Cochran Avenue 

EMplre 9103. LOS AJSGELES. GAL. 



URBAN 

Military Academy 

The Great Outdoor School 

for the building of Body and Brain and Character 
with Sports and Pastimes. Under Matchless Con- 
ditions. Address the Secretary, Miss Keller, 637 
Wilcox Ave,, Los Angeles. 



Pacific Military Academy 

Culver City 

Boarding and Day School. Beautiful new Italian 
Renaissance type buildings. Excellent Faculty. 
Out -door Classes. All athletics, swimming, gym- 
nasium, horseback riding and music. Enter any 
time in Grammar or High School. References 
required. For catalogue write Secretary or Phone 
Culver City 3294. 



The Greenwood School 

FOR GIRLS 

Select Resident and Day School. Limited Num- 
ber. In Session All Year. Principals: Mrs. M. 
Greenwood (Newnham College, Cambridge), Mr. 
H. F. Greenwood, B.A. (Corpus Christi College, 
Cambridge). 5928 Franklin Avenue, Hollywood. 



Page 28 



The CLUBWOMAN 



tions to represent the years since the club's or- 
ganization. As each of the five presidents arose 
to tell the history of her year's work, a candle 
was lighted and at the close of her address, 
it was snuffed out. 

At the conclusion of the luncheon, Mrs. Bruce 
escorted her guests to the tower, where they 
had a wonderful ^view of Pasadena, the "Crown 
City." 

At the last National W. C. T. U. Conven- 
tion held in Detroit, Mrs. I. W. Gleason, 
founder of the Gleason Parliamentary Club, 
was elected National Director of Parliamentary 
Law for the eighth cohsecutive year. 

A club luncheon was given at the Los An- 
geles Express on December 8, attended by sixty 
members and friends of tRe club. 

Club meetings are held the last Saturday of 
every month in Studio A of the Friday Morn- 
ing Club. Directors meeting at 11 a. m., 
luncheon at noon, Parliamentary section at 1 
p. m., regular meeting at 2 p. m. 

At the latest meeting, December 26, Mrs. 
Bertha Brinker talked on "International Rela- 
tions" and Mrs. W. E. Bruce on "American 
Citizenship." 



AVERILL STUDY CLUB 

By Clara S. Ifardner, Press Chairman 

The programs of the Averill Study Club for 
November and December have been varied and 
interesting. November 3rd, Mrs. Jennie Helen 
Keen, assisted by Miss Adele Lauth and Mrs. 
Frank De Long, presented a Musical. Mrs. 
George Herbert Clark, a member of the Board 
of Education, addressed the club on November 
17. "What Applied Communism and Bolshe- 
vism Have Done to Russia" was the subject 
of Baroness de Ropp's address, December 1st. 
Miss Victoria gave a travel talk, entitled 
"Egypt," December 8. 

The annual Christmas party was given De- 
cember 18, at the home of Mrs. J. J. Still. Fol- 
lowing a short musical program, Mrs. C. B. 
Slaughter read a beautiful -and entertaining 
Christmas story, "The Sign and the Symbol." 
The Christmas grab bag lent merriment to the 
occasion. Refreshments of sandwiches, assorted 
cakes, candy, punch and coffee were served. 



WOMAN'S SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA 

By Annamay H. De Grau, Press Chairman 

The Woman's Symphony Orchestra under the 
leadership of Mr. Henry Schoenefeld will render 
the first concert of the season, February 17, at 
the Philharmonic Auditorium. Rehearsals have 
been in order for some time and a well bal- 



anced program has been chosen. Schumann's 
Symphony No. 1, popularly known as "Spring" 
will be played and Alexander Kisselb'urgh has 
been selected as the soloist. Mr. Kisselburgh, 
the possessor of a rich baritone voice, will sing 
two arias w-ith orchestra accompaniment as well 
as a group of songs. This marks his initial ap- 
pearance with an orchestra. 

The Woman's Symphony with Mrs. Otto 
Neher as president and Bessie Fuhrer-Erb as con- 
cert-mistress, numbers about eighty and has full 
orchestration for all symphonic works. 

Details for the second concert scheduled for 
April 21 will be announced in a later number 
of The Club Woman. 



SANTA MONICA BAY 
WOMAN'S CLUB 

By Florence Coivan 

"Business as usual," would describe the ac- 
tivities of the Santa Monica Bay Woman's 
Club during the past month. One of the out- 
standing days was that devoted to the celebra- 
tion of the birthday of Mrs.^ D. G. Stephens, 
founder and president emeritus of the club : 
"Mrs. Stephens' Day" according to established 
custom, was observed by an all day program 
dealing with problems of social service, appropri- 
ately so since Mrs. Stephens' long life has been 
spent irr service to her fellow men. Speakers of 
the day included W. H. Holland, Superintend- 
ent of Charities of Los Angeles County, Miss 
Anise Fletcher, Director of the department of 
Public Welfare of Long Beach, Dr. Pomeroy, 
County Medical Supervisor, Hon. Will C. 
Wood, State Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion and Dr. Harold Stonier of U. S. C. 

Club departments are offering excellent pro- 
grams, one of them a delightful anticipation of 
the holiday season, was Hayden's "Toy Sym- 
phony" presented by Evelyn Paddock Smith 
and her pupils before the department of music, 
December 14. Tschaikowsky's "Nutcracker 
Suite" was also given with Dorothy Warren tel- 
ling the stories that serve as a foundation for 
the composition. The club's Christmas celebra- 
tion took the form of a surprise luncheon party 
for members, and a party for children in the af- 
ternoon to which all club children were invited 
and requested to bring with them a gift to be 
given to children of disabled veterans at Saw- 
telle. 

Recently the club voted one hundred dollars 
to assist in furnishing the Veteran's Memorial 
Hall being built at Sawtelle. 

Socially, the most important event of the fall 
season was the Husbands' Dinner, November 
20. The president, Mrs. N. S. Duckies, and 
the chairman of Hospitality, Mrs. B. W. Har- 
per, with the co-operation of the local repres- 



entative of the Los Angeles Steamship Company, 
arranged an Hawaiian evening that proved most 
successful. A profusion of palms and ferns pro- 
duced a tropical atmosphere which was increased 
by orange leis about the necks of the guests, and 
the strains of Hawaiian music. Beautiful mo- 
tion pictures of the islands, furnished by the 
courtesy of the steamship company and a charm- 
ing dancer made up the program for the even- 
ing. All was Hawaiian save the dinner which 
was of the best old American brand, the bird 
of Thanksgiving, forming the piece de resist- 
ance. 

Closing a happy and successful year, the club 
extends to all the other members of the great 
family of the federation, cordial greetings for the 
New Year. 



THE COLLEGE WOMEN'S 
CLUB OF LONG BEACH 

By Grace E. Irvin, Press Chairman 
So much publicity had been given by the local 
press preceeding the annual Hi-Jinks meeting 
that many phone calls were received by the mem- 
bership chairman, before the meeting, asking how 
one could arrange for membership and thus gain 
admittance to the December meeting. 

To say that the Hi-Jinks program was a suc- 
cess is putting it mildly. To quote the words of 
the Press-Telegram for December 6, more nearly 
bespeaks the success of the affair. This article 
opens as follows: "Drama took on a mellow- 
ness which even the early screen thrillers over- 





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Page 30 



The CLUBWOMAN 



looked and burlesque became as side-splittingly 
funny as any that the ancient gods are ru- 
mored to have encountered." 

Club members, grouped into nine divisions, 
presented the evening's entertainment. 

The Northwest colleges portrayed in two 
scenes, "The Evolution of Home, Sweet, Home." 
In the first was grandma knitting and the sec- 
ond grandmother Charlestons. 

The Wisconsin-Michigan group presented a 
scene at the Council Chamber and the clever 
satire on local issues literally "brought down the 
house." The bathing beauty parade was at least 
interesting as presented by Mr. Pike. 

The collegians from the middle-west colleges 
visualized the funny papers. Aunt Het, Abe 
Martin, Casper, Toots, Buttercup, Spareribs, 
Maggie, Jiggs, the Gumps, Dumb Dora and 
Ernie were all there. 

Northern California graduates presented, "A 
Perpetration in Three Speeds," repeating the 
normal speed playlet in both slow and rapid mo- 
tion. 

Reminiscent of old college days came the 
"Wide Pants Willies" from Illinois, who, with 
college songs, jokes and dances, won the hearts 
of all the audience. 

Wild, wooly drama was portrayed by "Wild 
Nell of the Plains, or Her Final Sacrifice." One 
can perhaps imagine how the maids from Texas 
and Ohio colleges appeared as they rode on fiery 
broomstick horses and fought off dreadful In- 
dians. 

Former lowans, in "Great Moments in Great 
Movies," presented scenes from "Covered 
Wagon;" "The Freshman"; "Cowboy;" "The 
Sheik;" "Peter Pan;" "Wendy;"' "Spook 
Ranch;" "Annie Rooney" and "Gold Rush.' 

Southern California enacted scenes from the 
lives of famous characters ; the words used hav- 
■ ing been cleverly penned in rhyme by Mrs. Frank 
Reid. 

The Atlantic Coast Colleges prophesied 
through, "Miss Long Beach Goes Crystal Gaz- 
ing," a brilliant future for the city and the Col- 
' lege Women's club. The model presented as 
the future CoUge Women's Club House was 
given vigorous applause. 

This was the first meeting of the year to 
; members only and the dinner, the fun and the 
prospects of a future club house all tended to 
draw the social bonds of friendship closer. 



LOS ANGELES TUESDAY 
AFTERNOON CLUB 

By Effie Webstei-, Press C/iairmari 
The Los Angeles Tuesday Afternoon Club 
met December 1, at the home of President Edith 
M. Schaubel, 900 West Eighteenth. A delight- 
ful luncheon was served, four of the guests be- 
ing especially honored with gifts and cards. 



their birthdays falling on or near this date. . 

A loving tribute was paid to members who 
have recently passed are Mary A. Snyder, chair- 
man of Ann , and Marie Swigart. 

Our club gavel had been loaned to our fu- 
ture president, Grace B. Willard, and with it 
she called to order the National Woman's Re- 
lief Corps in convention in Detroit. 

Mrs. Willard returned the now historic gavel 
and gave us most enlightening side lights on the 
convention. 

The annual Christmas party was held De- 
cember 22, with Mrs. Minnie Gray, 413 West 
Twenty-eighth street. 

The day following the club visited the Vet- 
erans Day Nursury in Sawtelle, taking gifts for 
the Christmas tree prepared for the little folks. 



UNIVERSITY BOOK CLUB 

By Shirley Ward, Press Chairman 
A Christmas party was held by members of 
the University Book Club on the 29th inst., at 
the home of Mrs. O. L. Shadford. Instead of 
exchanging little gifts, as has formerly been the 
custom, a luncheon was served at noon, for 
which each member paid 25 cents. Mrs. Ella P. 
Gee had charge of the luncheon, and Mrs. C. L. 
Bogue is Chairman of the occasion. 

The program for January 12th, 1926, is in 
charge of Mrs. Lelia Honner. The subject is 
the Pan-American Art Exhibit, and the club 
will visit the gallery at Exposition Park with 
Mrs. Honner, to see this wonderful collection 
of pictures. 



SOUTH SIDE EBELL CLUB 

By Edna Grace Cooke, Sub Press Chairman 
December has proven itself an extremely busy 
month for the South Side Ebell Club, for not 
only have the regular business and program 
meetings been held, but many social functions as 
well. Foremost among these were the two sef>- 
arate affairs held in honor of the club mem- 
bers, "In the Sunset of Life." The Social Serv- 
ice Section has made it a yearly custom that 
around the first of December they give an "Old 
Folks Party" and not only invite all in the club 
over 70 years "Young" — as these dear old ladies 
are wont to express it — but all elderly people in 
the neighborhood as well. This year the So- 
cial Service Section, under Anna McKey, cur- 
ator, put forth special effort to make an un- 
precedented success of the affair. A delicious 
chicken pot pie dinner was served at noon to 
some half hundred guests of honor and enter- 
tainers; after which a program — furnished for 
the most part by the older club members — was 
given. But this yearly party was but a fore- 
runner to a later affair, given in honor of 
these same elderly sisters; for at the club's reg- 
ular monthly luncheon, they were again guests of 



JANUARY, 1926 



Page 31 



honor. Helen Holther, toast mistress, paid a 
loving, glowing tribute to old age, ■while those 
following with responses continued in the same 
vein. South Side Ebell is e.xtremeh' proud of 
this elderly section of the club, which com- 
prises some dozen members, whose ages range 
from Mother Hayes — our celebrated Civil War 
Nurse — who boasts of her 92 years ; and Mother 
Vose — club poetess — who acknowledges all of 
87 years — and on down a graduated scale to the 
dead line of 70. And the amazing beauty of it 
all is that they are all for the most part, active 
club workers. 

On December 17th, the Junior Auxiliary, gave 
a beautiful Christmas play, written and di- 
rected by Kathrj'n Englehorn, dramatic curator. 
The Junior Auxiliary is an entirely new de- 
partment in the club, and Sadie Dewar, curator, 
is leaving no stone unturned in striving to make 
a success ' of this very important department. 
This playlet was given in lieu of the usual 
Christmas party the club gives each year, for its 
"kiddies." 

South Side has been unusually fortunate this 
month in having speakers who brought to the 
club subjects particularly pertinent to the hour. 
B. J. Darneille on "Good Citizenship;" Mrs. 
Seward A. Simons, speaking on the "World 
Court ;" Mrs. Louis Gillespie bringing the mes- 
sage of "The California Indian ;" Baroness 
Ottily de Ropp, from the land of Russia, 
speaking on "By Their Fruits You Shall Know 
Them ;" Mrs. Lillian Douuglas bringing the 



work of the Good Will Industries before the 
club in a message she designates "The Magic 
Rag Bag — Not a Charity, But a Chance ;" and 
last but far from least Bernice Johnson in her 
wonderful monthly message that she merely 
calls "Current Events." Assisting artists and en- 
tertainers for the month have lived up to the 
pace set by the speakers for no meeting but has 
been heard some artist of exceptional ability. No- 
table among these attractions, was the pro- 
gram given on December 17, by the Orion 
Trio. The personnel of this trio comprises of 
May Sellen Eby, soprano ; Anita Holden, vio- 
linist and Stella Flaukes Hall, pianiste, musicians 
who in their own particular line of artistry 
have won for themselves an enviable reputation 
in local musical circles. 

The South Side Ebell Club, extends the sea- 
son's greetings to the District at large not only 
in wishing them a joyous Christmas, but a 
happy New Year as well, and may 1926 see a 
great amount of real good accomplished by 
Federated clubdom, not only in our own Dis- 
trict, but throughout the state and entire Na- 
tion as well. 



OXNARD WOMAN'S CLUB 

By Lillie R. Hokin, Press Chairman 
The Oxnard Monday Club has successfully 
organized sections for athletics and study of in- 
ternational Relations and Current Events, Art, 
Music, Shakespeare and Literature and Drama. 
The first named section sponsored the last gen- 



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milk during tHe year 192S: 



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July City Health Department, Los Angeles 

September California State Fair, Sacramento First 

November Pacific Slope Dairy Show, Oakland First 



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Page 32 



The CLUBWOMAS 



eral program in November and other sections 
will present programs in the spring. The "Good- 
fellowship" section meets for a luncheon on club 
days preceding the regular session and is proving 
very popular. The drama section will no doubt 
enter a play in the Ventura County Eisteddfod 
in April, this club having won first place in the 
comedy division of these competitions last year. 
No meetings were held in December except a 
Christmas party for children of members. Mrs. 
J. Diefenbach is president. 



WOMEN'S AUXILIARY OF THE 
RAILWAY MAIL ASS'N. 

By Mrs. M. I. Clemmes, Press Chairman 
With the approaching holidays there comes to 
the W. A. R. M. A. the age-old desire to cheer, 
to comfort, to serve — wherever it is possible. The 
spirit of Christmas turns our thoughts back to 
a year ago when sixty-seven children, largely 
from the Goodwill Day Nursury, gathered 
around a big tree donated by the railway postal 
clerks. The memory of those appealing little 
faces fostered the inspiration to this year in- 
vade the headquarters of the Goodwill In- 
dustries — not only with a good sized tree but 
with the eats and sweets that make for a per- 
fect party. Mrs. Charles T. Beresford was 
chairman of the busy committee working to that 
end. A shower of foodstuffs was left for the 
children's use later on. 

Mrs. John B. Good arranged a kiddies pro- 
gram calculated to meet the requirements. In 
her own charming way Mrs. Good told a story. 
Dainty Ruby Johnson, Hollywood toe dancer 
gave two exhibition dances. The Klute twins 
clicked off a clog waltz, and among other fea- 
tures there were musical numbers by Marguerite 
Bell, Helen Fuller and the Detwiler sisters. 



FOR VETERANS' CHILDREN 

By Florence Dodson-Schoneman 
The following clubs responded to the call of 
the chairman of the Veterans' Children's Christ- 
mas party. Miss Georgia F. Sinclair and her as- 
sistant. Miss Isabel Fraters: Pomona Ebell, 
Catholic Women's Club Auxiliary, Los Angeles 
Ebell Auxiliary, Culver City Women's Club 
Auxiliary, Los Angeles Travel Club, History 
and Landmarks, San Fernando Valley Clubs, 
Elysian Heights Civic Club, Junior Auxiliary of 
the Redondo Beach Women's Club. 

The party was held in the new Memorial 
Hall from two to four on Wednesday, Decem- 
ber 23, and was open to all interested in giving 
Christmas cheer to the disabled Veterans' Chil- 
dren. 

Some of the well known youthful performers 
who presented a kiddies program during the after- 
noon were : Frances Dexter, the Child Pavlowa ; 
Phillipa de Lacey of radio and movie fame ; 



Betty Ann Ryan ; Mickey McBann, as a wee 
Highlander; Master Leon of radio fame; Miss 
Betty Wickersham, and others. 

The program was closed by the singing of 
"Holy Night," by tiny Master Jean, the grand- 
son of the Senior War Veteran Worker, Mrs. 
Henry T. Wright. 



BERT LYTELL SCORES 
IN "SILENCE" AT MASON .... 

Another "Return to the Stage" of a picture star has 
been scored at the Mason, where Bert Lytell opened 
on Christmas night, to a brilliant audience, in Max 
Marcin's melodramatic triumph, "Silence." Thomas 
Wilkes's good judgment in luring Lytell away from 
the movies for the principal role in "Silence" was 
heavily justified at the opening performance as the 
star scored a tremendous personal triumph in the 
role of Jim Warren. 

Mr. Wilkes will offer Lytell for a limited engage- 
ment in "Silence" which offers a pleasing variation 
from the long series of musical comedies at the Mason. 
The story will be spoiled for its audiences by the 
telling but it's principal theme concerns a character 
who goes almost to the death chair, keeping silence 
concerning a crime for which he was convicted but 
which he did not commit. 

Max Marcin, the author who was also responsible 
for "Eyes of Youth," "Cheating Cheaters" and many 
other hits, has cleverly utilized the movie flashback in 
telling his tale, so that the second act goes back 
twenty years prior to the first. Mr. Lytell's support- 
ing cast is excellent including such sterling players as 
Helene Millard, Douglas Montgomery, John Elliott, 
Joseph W. Gerard, Fred Cummings, Grace Goodall, 
Harold Nelson, Louis Morrison, Howard Nugent and 
Leigh Willard. 



CARPINTERIA WOMAN'S 
CLUB 

By Catharine Candlish Clark, Press Chairman 
The Carpinturia Woman's Club assembled for the 
opening program of the club year, in the Presbyterian 
Church, Thursday, September 3, there seeming to be a 
little fear about going to our club rooms in the Town 
Hall, as some seemed to feel it was unsafe to do so 
since the earthquake, but, after our first meeting all 
fear has been allayed. 

There are great promises for our club this year, as 
the program committee has arranged a most delight- 
ful year's program, and with the co-operation which 
is due, and forth coming from all our members, we 
feel we are going to have a most beneficial year, not 
only to our own club, but to our sister clubs. We are 
to have special days, such as Opera Day, Indian Day, 
Child Welfare Day, Americanization Day, Children's 
Day, Conservation Day, and California Diamond 
Jubilee Day. 

Let each and all help one another. 



BUENA PARK WOMAN'S CLUB 

By Mrs. L. J. IVilsey, President 
We held the first meeting of the new club year on 
the afternoon of October 1. There was a large at- 
tendance of members, and we had the pleasure of en- 
tertaining five visitors. 

Members of the different committees have been busy 
during the vacation months. Everything was in read- 
iness for a profitable year's work. 

The first program meeting was on October 15. The 
program committee arranged an instructive program 
on Fire Prevention. 



JANUARY, 1926 



Page 33 



Directory of California Products 

For the convenience of the seventy thousand clubwomen of California and the many others 
who have enthusiastically subscribed to the campaign of the women's clubs to promote in every pos- 
sible way the use by Californians of California products, The Clubwoman, mouthpiece of the cam,- 
paign, presents the follow^ng partial classified list of Classified products. In planning their shop- 
ping, clubwomen will find this list handy reference guide to what to order in carrying out their 
pledge to buy Califronia-made goods w^herever possible. 



AWNINGS 

Acme Tent and Awning Co. — Canopies. 
4069 Mission Road, Los Angeles. Tele- 
phone CApitol 7380. 

BUILDING MATERIALS _ 

Doors-Sash-Screens — Veneered Doors, High 



Dc 



& 



Grade Interior Finish — Pacific 
Sash Co. 

Hardwood Floor Finishers and Contractors 
— National Floor Co., Los Angeles. 

Mirrors, Sand, Plaster, Vitrolite — Raphael 
Glass Co., Los Angeles. 

Pioneer Paper Co., Manufacturers of Roof- 
ings. 

Sash-Doors-Hardwoods-Hard'ware — Frank 
Graves Sash, Door and Mill Co. 

CLOTHING 

"Bentsknit," "Ribstitched," Bathing Suits 

and Sweaters Pacific Knitting Mills, Los 

Angeles. 

"Summers Quality" outing and work cloth- 
ing for men and boys — Summers Mfg. 
Co., Inc. 

CARPET CLEANING 

City Steam Carpet Cleaning Works, John 
Bloeser, Main 0430. New Rugs. 

FOODS 

Biscuits, crackers, etc. — Pacific Coast Bis- 
cuit Co., Los Angeles. 

Capitol Products, flour, etc. — Capitol Mill- 
ing Co., Los Angeles. 

Carson-Baruch Baking Co., Inc., Wholesale 
Bakers, 3545 Pasadena Ave., Los Ange- 
les. Capitol 5 770. 

Christopher Co., L. J. — Quality Ice Cream 
and Candies. 

Faultless Bread — "Let your daily bread be 
Faultless." Faultless Bread Bakery, Los 
Angeles. 

Globe "Al" Flour, Macaroni Products and 
Cereals — Globe Grain and Milling Co., 
Los Angeles. 

Iris Brand "Over 200 Wonderful Things to 
Eat" — Distributed by Haas, Baruch & 
Co., Los Angeles. 

Morola — Nut Margarine, Morris & Co., Los 
Angeles. 



Olson's Bread, "O So Good" — Olson Bak- 
ing Co., Los Angeles. 

Puritas Vacuum-packed Coffee — a Los An- 
geles product, at most grocers. 

Miss Saylor's, Inc., Unusual Chocolates, 
6752 Venice Blvd., Culver City. 

FURNITURE AND HOUSE FITTINGS 
Barker Bros., 716-738 South Broadway — 
Complete Furnishers of Successful Homes 
— Our "Own Make" and "Mastermade" 
Upholstered Furniture and Hand-tailored, 
"individualized" Mattresses and Box 
Springs. 
Inglewood Furniture — Inglewood Manufac- 
turing Co., Inglewood, Cal. 
Kling Furniture — Kling Manufacturing Co., 

Los Angeles. 
Kwality Pillows, etc. — Kwality Feather Co., 
Los Angeles. 

Los Angeles Can Co. — Manufacturers of 
Tin Cans for all purposes. 
Sanotuf Mattress, furniture — Roberti Bros., 

Los Angeles. 
Stockwell Neverstretch Mattress — L. W. 

Stockwell Co., Los Angeles. 
Upholstered Furniture — Soronow's Furni- 
ture Manufacturing Co., Los Angeles. 
Window Shades — Window Shade Products 
Company, 9 1 East Fourth St., Los An- 
geles. 
"Zenith" Upholstered Furniture and Mat- 
tresses — Bailey-Schmitz Co., Los An- 
geles. 

Citizens Independent Ice & Cold Storage 
Co., 61 0-620 South Raymond Ave., Pasa- 
dena, California. Phone Colorado 30. 

GASOLINE AND MOTOR OIL 
Ventura Gasoline "California's Best," Ven- 
tura Motor Oil (Paraffin-Base) — -Ventura 
Refining Co., Los Angeles. 

MOTOR TRUCKS 
Moreland Motor Truck Co., Los Angeles. 

STORAGE BATTERIES 
Hobbs Storage Batteries, Hobbs Storage 
Battery Corp., Los Angeles. 

WATER HEATERS 
De Luxe and Supreme Gas Water Heaters 
— General Water Heater Corp., 1601 
Compton Ave. 



Fage 34 



The CLVBWOMAl^ 



THE CALIFORNIA HISTORY 

AND LANDMARK STUDY 

CLUB OF SANTA 

MONICA 

By Mrs. Fred G. Norton 

On October 19, the Santa Monica Bay Woman's 
club enjoyed a California Day. Mrs. A. X. Wilmot, 
President' or the Study Club, presided at the luncheon. 
The speaker was Mrs. A. S. C. Forbes, District 
Chnirman of Landmarks. The members attended in 
a body and had a special table. The speaker's table 
■vas decoraterl with the California Bear Flag. 

Several of the memners :nttnded the Landmark con- 
ferences. Thty are also nicmbers of the Los Angeles 
History and Landmark club, joining in the "earn a 
dollar and iell how you did if," for the "Save the 
Redivoods i'.md." 



IRWINDALE MISCELLANY 
CLUB 

The opening meeting of the Irwindale Miscellany 
Club was held October 6, presided over by the presi- 
dent, Mrs. T. E. Foster. The Club, whose member- 
ship is limited to forty, meets on the first and third 
Tuesdays at the homes of its members. 

Its primary purposes are: philanthropic work and 
neighborhood sociability. It has for many years aided 
the work of the Los Angeles Maternity Cottage, the 
David and Margaret Childrens' Home, The Child- 
rens' Hospital and local charities. Beside sewing 
for infants, Christmas gifts are prepared for the 
mothers at the Maternity Cottage and donations of 
fruit are annually made to the Cottage and to the 
David and Margaret Home. 

Speakers from the Federation as well as local 
talent will provide entertainment at the social after- 
noons which intervene between the all-day sewing 
meetings. A neighborhood day will this year take 
the place of the usual semi-annual reciprocity meeting. 



THE L. U. B. A. CLUB OF LONG 
BEACH 

By Miss Blanche I. Smit/i, Press Chairman 

An interesting study of Samoa was given for the 
L. U. B. A. Club, Friday, October 9 at its first study 
meeting at the home of Miss Blanche I. Smith. The 
speaker, Mrs. Elizabeth Foster, gave a splendid ac- 
count of Travelogue of the Saraoan Islands. Mrs. 
Bessie Buffum gave the life of Robert Louis Stephen- 
son. Mrs. Flora Mallonee, gave readings and Mrs. 
Ina Lowe sang selections from Child's Garden of 
Verse. Interesting reports were given by the Presi- 
dent, Mrs. Ethel Fisher, and others of the President's 
Council and from the Echo Park Mothers' Club. 



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"Wisdom is what a man gets after running his 
knowledge through the mill of experience," was the 
slogan of the day given by the leader of better English, 
Miss Clara Schermerhorn. 



LOS ANGELES DUNNING 
TEACHERS' CLUB 

The Los Angeles-Dunning Teachers' Club held its 
second regular meeting of the 1924-25 season at the 
residence studio of Isabel M. Love, normal teacher 
and President of the club, at 626 So. Catalina St. 

The "Dunning" lesson for the day was taught by 
Mildred G. Hanes — ^whose thorough knowledge of 
musical history and appreciation enable her to give 
an interesting and beneficial lesson to the club. 

This year promises to be the greatest of years since 
the club has been organized. 

Mrs. Caroline Pearson is being presented in monthly 
illustrated lectures on the various branches of music 
— both vocal and instrumental. These lectures will 
be illustrated by leading artists, local and imported, 
b}' opera singers. Philharmonic orchestra members — 
and leading oratorio singers. 

In addition to these lectures on music oppreciation, 
the club also is presenting one of the few teachers of 
the famous Dal Croaz work in the United States. 
This interesting study of euphonies will be used in 
conjunction with the regular "Dunning" work, which 
gives to all a thorough understanding of music — 
and makes practice a pleasure. 

The club will meet each second and fourth Wednes- 
day of the month. 

The officers are: Isabel M. Tone, president; La- 
Verne C. Fleetwood, vice president; Alice B. Cole, 
secretary. 



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Vol. XVI 

Published Monthly 



FEBRUARY, 1926 



No. 5 



Office, 706 Pacific Southwest Bank BIdg. 
Telephone EL. 273+; if no answer, TUcker 2274 
Mail Address Box 26, South Pasadena, Cal, 

Subscription Price SO Cents Per Year, Ten Cents the Copy Send subscriptions to Mrs. Bert Clifford, Box 26, 

South Pasadena, Cal. 
Edited by the Press Chairmen of the Clubs Represented . 
Entered at the South Pasadena Postoffice as second-class matter. 



Gleason's Parliamentary Digest 

Commencing in January, Mrs. I. W. Gleason will 
conduct afternoon and evening classes in Parlia- 
mentary Law at her own home, 1110 W. 30th 
St., Los Angeles, California. Membership limited. 

If you -wish to take advantage of these classes 
write Mrs. Gleason or phone BEacon 2894. 

Send orders for Digests to 

GLEASON'S PARLIAMENTARY DIGEST 
1110 W. 30th St., Los Angeles, California 

Cloth Cover Digest, $2; Paper Cover Digest, $1.50 
Special prices on Large R-U-S-D-A-M-V-R-O-A 
Charts during the months of January and February 



WOiMEN'S CLUB 
RANGE 



OF TOR- 



By Phoebe J. Mllburn, Press Representat'we 

Miss Daisy Koehler was elected president of 
the Junior Au.xiliary of the Women's Club of 
Torrance which was formed on January 11, 
with twent>'-six members. 

The other officers are Miss Ethelene Wood- 
ington, vice president ; Miss Garnett Cook, sec- 
retary" ; and Miss Lucile Morrison, treasurer. 

Girls from 14 to 22 are eligible for member- 
ship and the meetings \v\\\ be held twice a month. 

Tuesday, January 19 was International Rela- 
tion Day at the Women's Club of Torrance. 
A delightful program was arranged by Miss 
Lydia Pringle, chairman of International Rela- 
tions. Mrs. P. E. Keeler, vice president of the 
Long Beach Council of International Relations 
^vas the luncheon speaker and S. K. Bean of Los 
Angeles, Executive secretary of the Los Angeles 
Council of International Relations for Com- 
munity Education spoke in the afternoon. 

A program entitled Dance of Nations was 
given by the pupils of Eleanor Turley of the 
dancing and dramatic department of the Los An- 
geles Institute of Musical Art. 

The accompanists were Warren Creamer on 
the violin and Ruth Boomer at the piano. Mr. 
Creamer, accompanied on the piano by Miss 




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621 So. Flower St., L. A. 
(3 Doors No. of The Elite) 



Boomer gave a number of violin numbers during 
the afternoon. 

A beautiful American flag was presented to the 
club by Miss Pringle. 



TUJUNGA WOMAN'S CLUB 

By Nanine S. Kevane, Press Chairman 

The Tujunga Women's Club celebrated the 
occasion of the final payment of their $4,500 
club home with a luncheon December 29. The 
president, Mrs. Lillian D. B. Wheeler, presided. 
The plans for furnishing the club rooms and 
beautifying the grounds are being carried out. 
Other financial problems worked out this year 
are the pajment of the State Endowment Fund 
quota, the Redwood fund, the Santa Barbara 
Relief fund, Christmas cheer for the War Vet- 
erans at Sawtelle and a donation from individual 
members of $107 to the local Service Club. 

Mrs. Dan G. Kevane, program chairman, pre- 
sented in November Mrs. Minnie L. Dunn, 
pianist; Mrs. Harriet Scobey, vocalist and Mrs. 
Wendee, reader; in December Dr. K. S. Bean, 
International Relations ; January 14 in celebrat- 
ing California Diamond Jubilee presented Mrs. 
John Steven McGroarty with the Mission 
Players, Miss Framm, leading lady, Mr. Her- 
wig, tenor, and Miss Ramirez and brother in a 
Spanish dance. 



Page 4 



The CLUBWOMJN 



COVINA WOMAN'S CLUB 

Covina Women's club gave a unique enter- 
tainment to a capacity house on January 11. 
The capable chairman Mrs. C. M. Crawford 
arranged a fashion show. Twenty ladies pa- 
raded across the stage making a curtsy and turn- 
ing completely around as the date of the gown 
was announced. Dresses from 1800 to the pres- 
ent time were shown. Miss Minnie Russell 
wore the oldest gown with a collapsible calash 
bonnet ■while the most elaborate dress was a 
yellow brocade belonging to Mrs. J. H. Lindley 
of Azusa. 

Mrs. Henry Damarel in a costume of 1860 
charmingly sang several old songs one being 
"When You and I Were Young, Maggie." The 
photograph of the original Maggie was on ex- 
hibit next to the picture of the composer of the 
song whom she married. 

Mrs. George A. Daniels, vice chairman of 
history and landmarks of the Los Angeles district 
gave an interesting account of the "High Lights 
of California History" telling of some unusual 
facts connected with the founding of the mis- 
sions, the episode of the bear flag, the days of '49 
and the building of the overland railroad. 

Mrs. Mary M. Coman, president, called at- 
tention to the rare exhibit of antiques and heir- 
looms placed about the rooms. Old coins, flax 
wheels, hand woven coverlets, fine laces and 
silver were shown. 




Made by the Bakers of 
Snow Flakes 

Baked in the largest and moat modern 
English type traveling oven in the west. 
May be purchased also by pound or 
package from most grocers on the 
Pacific Coast. 

SHORTIE TIFFIN 

OXFORD ARROWROOT 

PETIT BEURRE DUNDEE 

BUFORD AVON 

ORANGE NECTAR 
PANAMA CREAM 

PACIFIC COAST BISCUIT CO. 



Los Angeles 

Sacramento 
Seattle Tacoma 



San Francisco 
Portland 

Spokane 



GOLDEN STATE DIVISION, 
INTERNATIONAL AUX- 
ILIARY B. L. E. 

By Mrs. Clarence Bush, Press Chairman 
Golden State Division, unlike most of her sis- 
ter clubs, closes her year in December and with 
her first meeting in January begins a new year. 
Officers are elected on the first meeting of De- 
cember and installed at a regular or special meet- 
ing before January 1. 

The corps of officers for 1926 is as follows: 
Past president, Mrs. M. Shean ; president, Mrs. 

E. C. Collins; vice-president, Mrs. J. M. Ste- 
phens ; secretary, Mrs. J. J. Norton ; treasurer, 
Mrs. G. F. Conway; insurance secretary, Mrs. 
M. E. Lewis; chaplain, Mrs. J. M. Baker; 
guide, Mrs. J. H. Blanchfield ; sentinel, Mrs. 

F. L. Gibson; flag-bearer, Mrs. R. W. Newbill ; 
marshals, Mesdames G. Strathearn and L. K. 
Calhoun ; pillars, Mesdames E. Becking, E. N. 
Osgood, J. J. McGrath and J. L. Vader and 
musician, Mrs. M. H. Densmore. 

This club, being one of the many branches 
of the International Auxiliary to, the Brother- 
hood of Locomotive Engineers, must attend first 
to its own lines of work in which philanthropy 
figures largely and, much to her regret, cannot 
gain as much good from the Federation as she 
would like but she feels honored in being a unit 
of that organization and is glad to help in every 
way possible. 



L W. Stockwell Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Stockwell Never 
Stretch Mattress 



Makes Any Bed 
A Better Bed 



Los Angeles 



California 



FEBRUARY, 1926 



Page 5 



\CTaI 



■^^y*^ /^'"^'^xJ^ ^""^iif fl ^J^fC'''S'*Ji 



'^s"^ 



Contents 



<-"'*_? 



Woman's Club of Torrance 3 

Tujunga Woman's Club 3 

Covina Woman's Club 4 

Golden State Division 4 

Gleason Parliamentary Club 5 

Los Angeles Ebell _ 6 

University Book Club 9 

Friday Morning Club 10 

Woman's Symphony Orchestra 12 

Woman's Club of Hollywood 13 

Wednesday Morning Club 16 

Woman's University Club 17 

Santa Monica Bay Woman's Club 18 

Long Beach Ebell 18 

Highland Park Ebell 20 

South Side Ebell 22 

Galpin Shakespeare Club 23 

Culver City Woman's Club 23 

Woman's Club of Downey 24 

Compton Woman's Club 24 

Women Lawyer's Club ; 25 

Community Club of Michillinda _ 25 

Woman's Club, Redondo Beach 

California History and Landmarks Club 28 

Woman's Auxiliary R. M. A 28 

Montebello Woman's Club 29 

Alhambra Woman's Club 29 

Pasadena Shakespeare Club 32 

Soroptimist Club 34 



GLEASON PARLIAMENTARY 
CLUB 

Ry Mrs. Sibyl Murchison, Press Chairman 

At the meeting of the Gleason Parliamentary 
Club on January 30 in the Friday Morning Club 
House, Mrs. F. T. Bicknell addressed the club 
on the "Conservation of Birds, Trees and 
Flowers." This subject is most interesting to 
all true nature lovers. A visit to any of our 
nearby canyons will give one a very definite idea 
of the way thoughtless visitors destroy the ferns, 
shrubs and flowers. This seemed a most ap- 
propriate time to have this subject presented to 
our members. 

Aliss Ida C. Iverson, principal of the Four- 
teenth Street School, explained in detail the new 
Federal Education Bill, which, if passed, will 
place a Secretary of Education in the Presi- 
dent's cabinet and which also provides for gen- 
eral educational research \vork. 

Mrs. Martha Marks conducted a quiz on 
"American Citizenship" and Mrs. Margaret 
Yale had charge of the parliamentary practice. 

This was the most instructive and educational 
program so far for the club year. Board meet- 
ing was held at 11 A.M., luncheon at noon, par- 
liamentary practice at 1 p.m., regular meeting at 
2 p.m. 



BOOKS YOU SHOULD 
READ IN FEBRUARY 

Life of Abraham Lincoln — Wm. 
C. Barton $10.00 

Perfect Tribute — Mary Shipman 
Andrews .75 

Constitution of the United States 
— James M. Beck 2.50 

Introduction to American Govern- 
ment by Frederic A. Ogg & P. 
Orman Ray 4.50 

George Washington — Country 
Gentleman — Paul L. Har- 
vorth 3.00 

Seven Ages of Washington — 

Owen Wister 2.00 



The JONES 



Opposite 

Square BOOK StOrC 

Los Angeles, California 
TRinity 431 1 



426-428 
West 
Sixth 



Jf^ell Dressed IVomen 

prefer 
u/Z^r" Corsets 

Any woman, whether she 
is of slight, or fuller, 
figure, finds herself more 
perfectly fitted, and there- 
fore more carefully 
groomed, in "Ivy" foun- 
dation garments ! 

Featured at The 
Ville de Paris! 

FOURTH 
FLOOR 

&1LDYASCO. 




Page 6 



The CLUBWOMAN 



I 'B0^-?^W6eifG^-€3eik& 



The Play's the Thing. 

Never has drama found such an ardent outlet 
as was recently demonstrated in clubs. A few 
things each season find their ivay to the stage, 
done by amateurs and acted by amateurs. These 
modest women may not be courting fame, but 
an outlet. They may make no pretense to dis- 
play those inventive or constructive artifices so 
essential to real drama, but often a rare tem- 
perament is expressed, and in time we may find 
some divine accident has produced real drama. 



Spare not the sowing, nor stint the harvest. 
Opportunity may open the door never before 
turned on its hinges. When this is so our clubs 
have not striven in' vain. The Ebell Club has 
as its Curator Mrs. A. H. Purdue, with Mrs. 
Harry Bender as director of the Drama Work 
Shop. Mrs. Bender has recently zuritten and 
produced a play which revealed hidden depths. 
It zvas artistically staged and sincerely acted. 
Our own beautiful Elsa Matheius did the lead- 
ing part. 



WHY WE GO TO THE THEATER 

By Mrs. A. H. Purdue 
a talk given before 



(A condensed reproduction of 
the Drama Department.) 

The theater affords a pleasure that is distinc- 
tive. It fires the imagination, it arouses the 
emotions, it lifts us out of ourselves. It is an 
expression of beauty, and beauty may make it- 
self felt in many ways, it may assume many 
forms. In the language of art, truth and beauty 
are synonymous and, whenever the stage is used 
for the projection of real life, it fulfils its mis- 
sion, whether or not the result is in keeping 
with the accepted meaning of beauty. 

Some persons feel that the theater is for 
amusement, for recreation, for refreshment only, 
while there are others who argue that it has a 
serious work to perform, that it should teach as 
well as please, that it must "point a moral" 
rather than "adorn a tale." Bernard Shaw 
says: "I am convinced that fine art is the 
subtlest, the most seductive, the most effective 
means of propagandism in the world, excepting 
only the example of personal conduct ; and I 
waive even this exception in favor of the art of 
the stage, because it works by exhibiting ex- 
amples of personal conduct made intelligible 
and moving to crowds of unobservant and un- 
reflecting people to whom real life means 
nothing." He is not very complimentary — is 
he ? — to the average audience found lin the 
theater. But the playwright who has a lesson 
in mind may be so forgetful of his art as to offer 
a plea rather than a play. To be an artist, he 
need not eschew questions of right and wrong, 
if they are really a part of the subject presented. 
Let him be content to tell the truth about life 
and allow his audience to draw its own con- 
clusions without being subjected to forcible feed- 
ing. True art is not primarily reformatory, yet 




Mrs. A. H. Purdue, Curator Drama Department 

we are a part of all that we have seen and heard. 
So drama leave its impress, whether the play- 
wright wills it so or not. One writer may 
exemplify the art that awakens thought and, by 



FEBRUARY, 1926 



Page 7 



the way, the inconclusive ending of many mod- 
ern plays helps produce this result. Another 
may try to force a drama to illustrate a theory 
or show a moral purpose. However, there is a 
wide difference between the artistic, which taps 
as gently as a mallet upon chiming bells, and the 
crudely didactic, which gives sledge hammer 
blows. 

If we ask ourselves why a representation of 
ever>'day happenings on the stage is more in- 
teresting than are the events that come to our 
personal notice, for a moment we might be 
^puzzled for an answer. Life may lack many 
things that are essential to drama and may have 
characteristics that would hinder its progress. 
So the technique of the artist is used both for 
grafting and for pruning. The dialogue must 
have a definite objective of two parts, i. e., to 
advance the plot and to portray character. It 
must not take a circuitous route, as does ordinary 
conversation, and it must not run off into some 
by^vay that may happen to please the fanc}^ 
Results must be obtained through efficiency. 
Galsworthy says: "It is easy to reproduce the 
e.xact conversation and movements of persons in 
a room; it is hard to produce natural conversa- 
tion and movements, ^vhen each phrase spoken 
and each movement made must contribute to the 
growth and perfection of the drama, and also 
must be a revelation, phrase by phrase, move- 
ment by movement, of essential traits of charac- 
ter." Witty sayings are not introduced just 
because the author happens to think of them ; 
the humor must grow from the situations. Mis- 
fortunes are not heaped upon the men and 
women of drama just to make a tragedy; they 
are the logical outcome of the conflict portrayed. 
Nothing is said or done unless the action calls 
for it. ' 

Thoughtful persons try to arrange their 
activities so that each new day may bring in- 
spiration for wise living. We women have our 
rounds of duties, divided in most instances be- 
tween home and club. But at times we feel 
the need of changing our environment, and we 
find that the opportunity to see a good play may 
be the means of our taking at least a mental ex- 
cursion into some far-away realm. 

The temporary removal of ourselves to scenes 
that are wholly different may prove of educa- 
tional value as well. If we are interested in the 
histori,' or customs of a certain country, perhaps 
some play will furnish us just the background 
that we need for the adjustment of our ideas. 
The vivid delineation of characters and the cor- 
rect stage setting will give us a clarified view 
that we may obtain in no other way. 

An imitation of familiar realities, presented 
with freshness, clearness and accuracy of obser- 
vation, leads to the understanding of human na- 
ture, our own included. It enables us to laugh 




Mrs. Harry Bender. Director Drama IVork 

at our own foibles and to sympathize with the 
weaknesses of our friends. A certain play may 
not appeal to us, but if it has been successful 
we may be eager to see it. We are aided in 
our study of human nature by knowing what 
is popular, for it is the public that makes suc- 
cess possible. 

The theater may offer a contribution to our 
sense of internationalism, which is so important 
in the life of the present. The message of a 
great artist is understood wherever it goes. 
Thus they may have more influence than ex- 
perienced diplomats in promoting friendly rela- 
tions between nations. 

The American actor, James K. Hackett, went 
to Paris in 1924 as the guest of the French na- 
tion to present his impersonation of Shakespear- 
ean characters. After his return home, he made 
a request of Secretary of State Hughes that Fir- 
min Gemier be asked to play in New York. Mr. 
Hughes appointed a committee of well-known 
men to issue the invitation to the great French 
actor. ^^Tien Gemier was being officially wel- 
comed to New York, he spoke of the young 
men present and said, "The lights in their eyes 
are the same as those that shone in the eyes of 
America's soldiers when they were doing battle 
for France and civilization." Great intercut 



Page 8 



The CLUBWOMAN 



was shown in both the modern and classic plays 
that were presented by Gemier and his company 
and a forward step was made towards neigh- 
borly understanding. 

We have another example in the recognition 
bestowed upon John Barrymore when he visited 
London for the purpose of playing Hamlet. The 
result of such an event is set forth in a single 
sentence from a speech made by Sir Frank Ben- 
son at a social affair given in honor of Barry- 
more. He said, "The artists of both our great 
nations may unite in shaping a great world after 
the agonies of war." 

Children like to act things out and their vivid 
imaginations make their games seem very real. 
Small boys construct trains of the nursery chairs 
almost before they can walk. Little girls play 
keeping house in rooms that are outlined merely 
by rows of blocks, and they are supremely happy 
when they are allowed to deck themselves in the 
discarded finery of their elders. 

As our young people grow older, they enjoy 
masquerade costumes. Who knows what hidden 
desires are finding expression when they make 
their selections? Very few of us attain the 
fulfillment of the longings so strongly felt dur- 
ing childhood, and we should probably have been 
disappointed if fate had meted out to us the 
kind of excitement for which we have been 
half-consciously wishing during the passing of 
the years. 

One of the prominent ministers of the city 
confesses that during his boyhood he planned 
to be a pirate. A successful lawyer's ambition 
was to drive a stage-coach. One who is a con- 
tented wife and mother dreamed of bringing 
the world to her feet by her singing, although 
she had no voice at all. A demure little stay- 
at-home expected Prince Charming to appear 
and carry her away on a magic carpet. A 
handsome girl longed for diappointment in love 
because she thought it would be so romantic. 

Thus we may feel that life has cheated us 
of certain things- But by going to the theater, 
we may suffer the things that we should have 
liked to suffer, we may enjoy "the pomp and 
circumstance" that have no place in a demo- 
cratic form of government and perchance we 
may eat other kinds of forbidden fruit. 

Teachers are wise in that they are giving 
young people an opportunity to use their inher- 
ent dramatic ability. So many different kinds 
of talent may be employed. In addition to play- 
wrights and actors, there are needed directors, 
musicians, costume designers, carpenters, painters, 
electricians, and even scene shifters. They learn 
to co-ordinate their work and they begin to 
think in terms of the whole. The result is a 
solidarity that bodes well for our social and 
moral life. 

There is an ever-growing interest in drama 




Miss Elsa Matheii-s 

among our clubwomen. They are writing plays, 
they are producing them, they are taking part 
in them. In other words, they are keeping up 
with their sons and daughters. Usually a 
program of play will attract a larger audience 
than anything else that is offered during the club^ 
vear. 

Religious drama is being revived and church 
chancels are being used for the presentation of 
pla\'s before reverent congregations. Probably 
within a few years many of our churches will 
have special auditoriums for dramatic produc- 
tions. 

Thus, church, club and school may bring 
about an improvement of the American stage. 
Intelligence in tlie audience will cause more ef- 
fort on the part of the playwright and the actor. 
Since the theater is having more and more in- 
fluence on daily life, it is important that it shall 
not offer to us a caricature of art. 

When the history of drama in any country is 
studied closely, one is able to interpret the 
thought and feeling of different periods. It is 
of interest to trace the development of the the- 
ater and to note its connection with the striking 
events of national life. There will always be 
found a reason for the ebb and flow of its popu- 
larity and for its alteration of form. We are 
living in a time of stress, of rapid change, and 
of advancement in the thought of the world. 
The natural outcome is a great fondness for the 
theater. 



FEBRUARY. 1926 



Page 9 



FRIENDSHIP AND FELLOW- 
SHIP 

Friendship and fellowship alone can thrive 

In hearts that lend themselves; in hearts that 

strive 
To weld a chain of strong unbroken links 
Of pure rich gold, for he who sinks 
His fondest self into oblivion, 
And loves before himself his fellow man, 
He is a friend indeed, trusted and tried, 
One whose supremest act is glorified, 
Exalted, and made grand, by selflessness. 

In the confusion of our tangled lives 
There blooms a flower 
That casts a magic spell : It is the power 
To see things as they are — the false, the true — 
That all may understand : Give unto each its 
due. 

It is far better to defy defeat 

And go on trusting to the end — 'Tis sweet 

To be held high and close in confidence, 

Even unrequited toil may recompense 

Obtain, through friensdhip's grace, 

But, oh. to do, to strive, to be, 

And feel but sad futility. 

The toiler's yield should be his wage: 'Tis 

true — 
And what have we to give, both I and you? 
A fond true trust — A trusting fondness true. 

^ ou give your trust to me, I mine to you^ 
So that mysterious flower, that buds at friend- 
ship's birth 
Bursts into bloom, and glorifies the Earth. 

Emma B. Keepers. 



UNIVERSITY BOOK CLUB 

By Shirley Coleman, Press Secretary 

Through the courtesy of the curator, the Uni- 
versity Book Club held its business meeting 
January 12 in the Governor's Room in the Fine 
Arts Building at Exposition Park. 

E. Roscoe Shrader, director of the Otis Art 
Institute, generously consented to escort the club 
through the art galleries and greatly added to 
their enjoyment of the Pan-American Art E.x- 
hibit by calling attention to the merit of the 
pictures. 

A benefit card party was given on the 19th 
by Mrs. Florence Call. 2000 Miramar Street, to 
members of the club and their friends. There 
was a charge of fifty cents, the proceeds to go 
to the Child Welfare section. Several pretty 
prizes were given, and the affair was well at- 
tended, about sixty people being present. 

Th program for January 26 was in charge 
of Mrs. Ella P. Gee, who spoke on "Excava- 
tions." 




The combination of taffeta 
and Ninette crepe was spon- 
sored by Lenief and Renee 
in recent Paris openings . . . 
It is one of the reasons for 
fashionable interest in the 
new collection of dresses 
in Bullock's Fashion Sec- 
tions. Dresses most unu- 
sual at $59.50. 

Bullocks 

Broadway— Hill 
and -SeventK. 

"Oae o'ClocTc^^aturda^vj"" 



Page 10 



The CLUBWOMAN 



IIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIll 



FRIDAY "MORNING <MJS 



ART 

By Mrs. Richard Cttllen Farrell 



"IVe need the ivh'ite hyacinth as well 
as the loaf of bread." — Elbert Hubbard. 

And yet many people look upon Art as a 
decoration, a sort of fringe on the edge of life, 
something to be shut up in galleries and gazed 
upon in idle moments. But Art is part of the 
warp of man's existence. It cannot be a thing 
apart. It is another name for civilization ; just 
the beautiful way of doing anything. Fine pro- 
portions and good color are no more expensive 
than discordant and ugly shapes and color. Art 
appreciation is the understanding of the value 
of beauty in every walk of life, and the value 
of trying to create beauty. 

In measure as we appreciate Art, will we de- 
mand better things. We all know that the 
greatest countries in history are those in whicii 
Art has flourished. Patrons of Art, by foster- 
ing the creative instinct are the greatest driv- 
ing power toward making the world a better 
place to live in. Let this be our slogan then, 
"To transmit my country, not less, but more 
beautiful than when it was given to me." Frank- 
ly, I cannot claim entire originality in the ex- 
pression of these ideals. They are often from 
the mental storehouses of my brilliant contem- 
poraries. 

The club year is not yet half completed, and 
therefore a resume of our work cannot be given. 
It is too incomplete to view with any real satis- 
faction. Most of it is still in our minds — a play 
whose cast of characters has still to be cho^n — 
the plot is ready, but the stage is not set. How- 
ever, only the other day, one of our inspired 
news reporters gave us a complete and detailed 
account of the Pasadena pageant three hours 
before it took place. Imagination is a marvel- 
ous possession. Last August I imagined my- 
self original, possessed of many wonderful ideas 
quite all my own. Alas, they must have been 
in the air, because I find them everywhere. The 
whole world is just full of these same thoughts. 
Everyone is saying them and myself is just a tiny 
grain of sand in all the myriads. And still I 
think I have just a little one left, and that is 
quite contrary to the accepted thought of the 
moment. 

Mr. Everyman says: "You must have an open 
mind and try to see what the artist is trying to 
express. Just because it doesn't look the way 




Mrs. Richard Cullen Farrell 

you have always felt about it, just because you 
don't like it at first, don't condemn, but strive 
to understand. Now I ask you "why?" What 
did God give me these instincts for, these tastes, 
these senses, this queer thing called a brain, eyes 
to see, ears to hear — yes, but an intelligence to 
use. I say "Use it." Think for yourself, never 
be swayed by fear of criticism, never be over- 
whelmed by the egotism of critics. Each of us 
has God-given instincts, and a brain to use. If 
you allow outside influences to sway you against 
your own better judgment, you will be a sheep 
always. Any wolf can eat you. When you go 
into an art gallery, and I hope it is often, view 
it with seeing eyes, even if }'ou are flayed by 
the stinging whips of scornful, self-styled aesthe- 
tes. You are the highest effort of God's crea- 
tion. He has given you the ability to select, an 
instinct to understand the difference between 
right and wrong, and good and bad. If a paint- 



FEBRUARY, 1926 



Page 11 



ing expresses the beauty which you see and feel, 
it is beautiful and if it does not, it needs no ex- 
plaining. For that thing is ugly which is fun- 
damentally antagonistic to our sensibilities. 

Not long ago, an artist who is exhibiting in 
the Pan-American spoke of the picture which he 
intended to send. He said, "I don't care for 
the picture, but I had to make it striking and 
brilliant in color or no one would see it in that 
exhibition of futurist things." It was the only 
bad painting which he had, to me it was very 
tragic to see this humiliation in a man so richly 
endowed with genius — a gift to express all the 
marvelous subtle beauty which he sees in Nature 
— to give us those rare moments in life when 
we seem to have more than human vision — and 
yet he betrayed his genius, sold his very soul for 
fear of the criticism of a few ordinary mortals. 

In our Pan-American Exhibition, there are 
many very wonderful works of art. They are 
often hung in the corners and out of way places. 
They have no medals or awards. They are those 
pictures painted by real artists who love beauty 
and would never stoop to conquer. Their works 
will live always. You will know these paintings 
when you see them, because you love them in- 
stinctively. Let your own intelligence and natu- 
ral understanding guide you, for the public is 
the ultimate judge of all Art. 

An artist is an interpreter of the beauty of 
life. He must not see what is not beautiful, 
much less paint it. A real artist has nothing 
to conceal — no hidden meaning. He is as obvi- 
ous as the sun, moon and stars — he speaks with 
his brushes of lovely things we all know, and his 
soul is that of a child. He never grows old, 
really, and what has this to do with the Friday 
Jlorning Club? 

This year we are having exhibitions of a 
month's duration. We are now in our fourth. 
With the exception of December, we have shown 
oil paintings and miniatures by contemporary 
artists, a great many of the popular favorites. 
The artists have been most considerate in loaning 
us their pictures and the galleries have also co- 
operated with us in a very generous spirit. We 
have continued the monthly meetings and tours 
this year. There seems to be abundant enthu- 
siasm over tours, and artists are most good na- 
tured in allowing crowds of art lovers to come 
into their fascinating homes. Seymour Thomas, 
one of our foremost portrait artists, thrilled his 
hearers with a talk of his experiences in Europe. 
Orrin White showed us his fine canvasses in 
his lovely Spanish studio, among the eucalypti. 
Mrs. Merwin gave us word pictures of Holland 
so vivid that we all felt as though we had been 
there with her — a most fascinating afternoon. 

In the study of Art Appreciation, we have lis- 
tened to talks by such men as F. ToUes Cham- 
berlin, William Lee Woollett, Clyde Forsythe 



and George Innes, Jr. In February we shall 
hear Gutzon Borglum and many other splendid 
things are planned for the rest of the year. 

In December Mrs. Frank Dimmick, president 
of the Crafts Study Club, gave us a very gor- 
geous exhibition of Arts and Crafts, whicb 
everyone seemed to enjoy greatly. Our minia- 
ture chairman, Ella Shepard Bush, has given 
us a new display of miniatures each month. We 
have placed selected sculpture in the gallery with 
each exhibit, featuring Maud Daggett Bjurman 
and Ella Buchanan up to the present time. Mer- 
rill Gage will exhibit in February. 

In our work of the year, we are greatly in- 
debted to the untiring efforts of our committee, 
Mrs. H .S. Miles, Mrs. John Elliott and Hrs. 
-Murray Jones. 

This month's exhibition of our own Friday 
Morning Club artists received the congratula- 
tions of their many friends at the opening mu- 
sicale and reception Tuesday, January 5. It was 
a most delightful occasion and one to be remem- 
bered. One begins to feel a little glow of en- 
thusiasm in the very air, and so we are looking 
forward to a happy fulfillment of this year of 
Art, for Art is an interpretation of Life, of our 
thoughts and our feelings. It is a great part of 
living the Great Adventure. But most of all, it 
teaches us to love the works of God, to cherish 
and protect all living and growing things. It is 
the greatest inspiration to higher living. 



FRIDAY MORNING CLUB 
NOTES 

By Mrs. Frederick Hickok, Press Chairman 

Programs of much interest are scheduled for 
the Fridav Morning Club for the new year. 
Dr. Lewis N. Chase, Ph.D., of China; Sher- 
wood Anderson, speaking on "The Younger 
Generation," and Ritza Freeman Reardon, who 
has so charmingly developed the ancient art of 
story telling, all appeared on the January pro- 
grams. In February the club will have on its 
calendar, Dr. Robert Freeman, lecturer; Olga 
Steeb, pianist ; Gutzon Bx)rglum, speaking on 
"Art and Life," and C. A. Dykstra on "Pictures 
and Politics." 

The 106th anniversary of Madam Severance's 
birth was observed on January 15 with Florence 
Dodson Schoneman speaking on "Spanish Pio- 
neers," Mrs. William S. Bartlett, on "Pioneer 
Woman," and Miss Lloy Galpin, "Woman of 
Today." 

One of the outstanding meetings of the month 
was the Drama Committee meeting when some 
of the following questions were dealt with : 

"Is there any decency limit in subjects for 
plays?" 

"W^hy is a bad play worse than a bad book — • 
or is it?" 



Page 12 



The CLUBWOMAN 



"Do you think acting is more important than 
the play, or is the play the thing?" 

"If a play proves to be poor, shall we be true 
to ourselves and leave the theater, or be cour- 
teous to others and stay?" 

"Is American drama going up or down?" 

At the Public Affairs meeting a deeper insight 
was given into the problems of the authorities 
of the city such as Juvenile Police Bureau, Police 
Training School, Fire Prevention, Parole Sys- 
tem, and Traffic Commission. 

The Art Exhibit in the gallery for January 
was all the work of club members as was the 
Art Program on the 26th, when Miss Leta Hor- 
locker, Mrs. E. E. Leighton, Miss Marie E. 
Crow and Mrs. H. G. Everett were the con- 
tributors. 

The Emergency Auxiliary Committee which 
was organized just three years ago, and con- 
sists of about twenty-five of the younger women 
of the club, is meeting every Monday morning 
in Studio D and sewing for the Orthopedic Hos- 
pital. Several hundred dollars have been dis- 
bursed by this committee, which is also furnish- 
ing amusement for the little invalids in the mus- 
lin counterpanes which are appliqued with gay 
pictures of bright material, which provides some 
diversion and entertainment during long weary 
days of pain. Mrs. W. A. Bonynge is chair- 
man and Mrs. Jennie Helen Keen is secretary- 
treasurer and they wish to enlarge the work so 






Mrs. Frederick Hickok 

the bridge tea to be given on January 28 is to 
be a benefit for this good cause. 



WOMAN'S SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA OF LOS ANGEI,ES 



The Woman's Symphony Orchestra of Los 
Angeles, of which Mrs. Otto H. Neher is presi- 
dent, is devoted to the study of symphonical 
orchestral music. Since early in October the 
weekly rehearsals have been well attended, with 
an increasing enthusiasm for work as the time 
is drawing near for the opening of the concert 
season at the Philharmonic Auditorium. 

The first of the two concerts will be given on 
Wednesday evening, February 17, with Mr. 
Alexander Kisselburgh, one of the leading bari- 
tones of the west as soloist. The soloist for the 
second concert on April 21 will be Mr. Sylvain 
Noack, renowned violinist and concertmaster of 
the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra. He 
will appear with the orchestra playing Beetho- 
ven's violin concerto. 

The exquisite Spring Symphony of Schuman, 
a work of great beauty and charm and one which 
has not been heard here for years will be the 
principal number of the first program. Mr. 
Henry Schoenefeldt, the well-known composer- 
conductor, has again chosen a program which 
will appeal to all music lovers. 



The Woman's Symphony is not only one of 
the oldest music clubs, but is also one of the 
oldest woman's clubs in California. Since 1894, 
when it was organized, its work has been con- 
tinuous. Mr. Harley Hamilton and Mr. Henry 
Schoenfeldt were the leading spirits during those 
years. 

The active membership consists of eighty 
woman musicians, many of whom are profes- 
sionals. Among the prominent club women who 
have been active members are Mrs. Russell 
Waters and Mrs. Sydney Exley. The first con- 
cert, February 17, will be as usual the orches- 
tra's reciprocity event of the year. 

A vigorous campaign is being carried on by 
the members for associate, sustaining and patron 
memberships. Clubs may become patron mem- 
bers and may have their seats en bloc. Mrs. 
Leah Witzel, 6804 Bonzallo Avenue, Phone 
THornwall 3123, the corresponding secretary 
of the W. S. O., will be pleased to make reser- 
vations or give any further information regard- 
ing the activities of this enterprising organiza- 
tion. 



FEBRUARY, 1926 



Page 13 



WOMAN^ CLOB (WmWWOOT> 



THE RING AND THE BOOK 

(Continued from Last Month) 
By Mrs. Hector Geiger 



A talk given before the Broivning section of the 
fVoman's Club of Hollyv:ood 

Guide's agent in carrying this on was 
a waiting maid named Margherita. This thing 
went on for some time, till Caponsacchi did de- 
cide to come to Pompilia's window. To his sur- 
prise he found her there, not Count Guido as he 
expected. She told him her troubles and after 
much hesitation he arranged to take her away. 
They started before daybreak and drove all that 
day and the foUoiving night and the second day 
and reached Castelnuovo, 15 miles from Rome. 
There she fainted away and had to be left at the 
Inn. There Count Guido overtook them and 
they were presently brought before the Roman 
court. The judges, of course, thought it was 
only a young priest's escapade, this running away 
with another man's wife and treated the matter 
as a good deal of a joke. But they had to do 
something to satisfy Count Guido and to up- 



hold the dignit}' of the law. So they imposed a 
light sentence on each. Pompilia was sent to a 
convent of penitents in Rome and after some 
months was transferred to the home of her foster 
parents, where she was under bond to remain as 
a prisoner. Caponsacchi was relegated to Civita 
Vecchia where he was not a prisoner but a sort 
of exile detained within the limits of that town. 
Count Guido went home to Arezzo. 

So things stood until a week before Christmas,, 
eight months after the flight. Then Pompilia's 
child was born. It was a boy and was christened 
Gaetano, and was taken away and hidden with 
its nurse in some place in the country for fear 
harm might come to him from Guido. The birth 
of this child could of course bear two interpre- 
tations, and Guido at once put the worst one 
possible on it. He summoned four men from his 
country estate and proceeded with them to 
Rome. They came on the evening of the sec- 



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The CLUBWOMAN 



ond day of January, 1698, to the villa where 
Pompilia was living with Pietro and Violante. 
Guido knocked at the door and in reply to a 
voice within asking "who is there?" answered 
"Caponsacchi." When the door was opened 
Guido and some of his men rushed in and killed 
Pietro and Violante and wounded Pompilia so 
seriously that she died after four days of suffer- 
ing. Officers of the law pursued Count Guido 
and his accomplices, arrested them and brought 
them back to Rome where they were placed on 
trial. Notice that there were two trials of im- 
portance besides minor lawsuits. One important 
trial is that in which Caponsacchi and Pompilia 
were tried for elopement and received the light 
sentences already mentioned. That trial is only 
incidentally mentioned in these speeches. The 
other trial of importance is the trial of Count 
Guido and his four accomplices for murder at 
. which trial Caponsacchi is only a witness, to tell 
what he may know as to the causes which led 
up to the murder. This is the trial in connec- 
tion with which Browning presents the monolog 
in the Ring and the Book. If one will only 
remember this fact of the two trials, much con- 
f\ision will be avoided. 

The court found Guido and his accomplices 
guilty and sentenced them to death. Guido ap- 
pealed to the Pope, as he had a right to do, hav- 
ing taken minor orders in the church. The Pope 
confirmed the verdict of the court, and the 
criminals were executed on the following day, 
February 22, 1698. Count Guido, because of 
his rank was beheaded and his accomplices were 
hanged. 

Already within a month after Pompilia's death, 
the Convent of St. Mary Magdalene of the 
Converties brought suit claiming her property 
on the ground that she had been guilty of adul- 
tery and that this convent had been granted 
the privilege of having the propertj' of such wo- 
men dying in Rome. But in September of the 
same year the court rendered its decree, refusing 
to grant this petition and officially clearing Pom- 
pilia's reputation and restoring her good name. 

The Ring and the Book is the supreme work 



of Browning's mature genius and it exhibits in a 
marked degree his excellences and defects. He 
was 56 years old when the poem appeared and 
Mrs. Browning had been dead seven years,' 
though parts of the poem were begun within 
three or four years of her death. It is to her 
soul that the exquisite invocation is addressed : 

"O lyric love, half angel and half bird 

And all a wonder and wild desire. 

Hail, then, and hearken from the realms of 
help." 
And he begs, 

"That still, despite the distance and' the dark," 
there may be 

"Some interchange of grace, some splendor 
once thy very thought. 

Some benediction anciently thy smile." 

As already noted in the discussion of Brown- 
ing's treatment of his sources, it is easy to see 
many characteristics of Mrs. Browning in his 
conception of Pompilia. To read The Ring and 
the Book understandingly is a sort of university 
education, for the poem is packed with Brown- 
ing's vast knowledge from beginning to end, 
much of it cropping out in obscure allusions and 
reminiscences, and the tendency to go on and 
on is given free rein, resulting in a work of for- 
bidding length, while the temptation to go into 
by-ways of philosophic arguing is sufficiently re- 
sisted. 

Yet in spite of all the defects which any of 
the critics may charge up gaainst it, The Ring 
and The Book is a great and wonderful work. 
It is so vast and so various that, as was well 
hardly be the work of one man. 

The poem has a splendid wealth of color, not 
said many years ago, it seems as if it could 
only in characters and plots, but in metaphor and 
simile. It is full of dramatic interest, and 
abounds in passages of exquisite poetry and word 
pictures drawn with rare skill and delicacy. Its 
lines are freighted with great thoughts that are 
quite unforgettable and it would be difficult to 
call to mind another work in which beauty of 
thought and nobility of expression are so lavish. 
In subtle understanding of human nature in its 



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FEBRUARY, 1926 



Page 15 



depths and height and length and breadth, we 
have no equal, excepting the great Shakespeare. 
Indeed he is so subtle sometimes that many miss 
the point. The matter between Caponsacchi and 
Pompilia would be grossly interpreted now, as 
such things have always been. It is perfectly 
evident that, according to Browning's idea of 
it, there was no one in the wide world to Pom- 
pilia like Caponsacchi, no one in the wide world 
to Caponsacchi like Pompilia. Yet there was no 
sin bet^veen these two. However passionately 
Caponsacchi loved Pompilia he held himself in 
control. He says : 

''I never touched her with my finger tip 
Except to carry her to the couch that eve, 
Against my heart, beneath my head bowed low. 
As we priests carry the paten." 

There was no surrender to passion. Yet these 
two loved each other with so great a love, that 
if soul can save soul, such souls as theirs must 
surely be in Paradise. 

Caponsacchi was a light and frivolous priest. 
He admits it. He took his vows under an easy 
interpretation of them, and spent his time be- 
tween duties and offices of the church on the 
one hand, and on the other, in dancing attend- 
ance upon ladies and making himself generally 
popular and seeking preferment. But when 
Pompilia came into his life ever5'thing was 
changed. The making of light poems seemed 
foolish, and the church came suddenly to have a 
new meaning. Life became a different thing. 
Even before he had ever spoken to her he was a 
changed man. 

By a keen insight Caponsacchi knew that the 
letters which were brought to him did not really 
come from Pompilia, but from Guido, so he 
egged Guido on and played with him by drop- 
ping now and then a half committal word in his 
replies. The temptation to do this, to bring 
Guido to a "thrashing" is entirely true to human 
nature. 

The struggle which Caponsacchi went through 
before he decided to take Pompilia away is a 
great study in the development of a soul. He 
was staking everything and would lose every- 



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thing. He knew that no one would give him 
credit for right motives in running away with 
Count Guido's wife. His whole future was at 
stake. Yet here was the service of God and he 
knew that he could never have any respect for 
himself before God if he failed to help the 
woman in her need. 

The moral struggle through which he passed 
between the time she first spoke to him and the 
hour when they fled is a mighty one. He actu- 
ally persuaded himself not to do it, and he went 
to her window the second time with the inten- 
tion of comforting her and advising her not to 
despair. But when she appealed to him again, 
throwing herself upon his help in her despera- 
tion, all his resolutions went to the winds. He 
recognized here the challenge of dutj" — a chal- 
lenge which he could not refuse without mak- 
ing himself a coward before God, and he totd her 
how to meet him and escape. How true to psy- 
chology' is every step of the process, and most 
true the reversal of his decision at the end. 
Nothing could tell more vividly of his struggle 
than his pacing the streets of the city all night 
after their first interview, unable to think con- 
nectedly of the matter, knowing that he is at a 
crisis, and is passing into a different state, never 
to be the same man that he was, finding himself 
"i' the grey of the dawn" facing his own church, 
with a painful realization of how it has changed 
tone" as it speaks to him now, and next day 
sitting dazed in his room and letting time run 
over him. A striking insight into human nature 
is shown in the fact that this man who has mum- 
bled hundreds of prayers says, in an hour of real 
stress and exceeding need: "Why, in my whole 
life I have never prayed." 

So we could go on, step by step through Ca- 
ponsacchi's speech and point out Browning's psy- 
chological acuteness for it is on every page. It 
comes out in every phase of the experience at 
Castelnuovo, where Guido overtook the runa- 
ways. It comes out in Caponsacchi's never for- 
giving himself for not killing Guido when he 
had the chance and in his feeling how ridiculous 
it was for Guido to claim such a woman for his 
wife. It comes out again in Caponsacchi's beg- 
ging the court to let him see Pompilia again, just 
as a priest to minister to her when he is dying, 
and in the reverence for her which his love has 
given him — a reverence so great that the cham- 
ber where she slept at Castelnuovo was to him 
a chapel, and he carried her thither with all the 
awe with which a devout believer in transubstan- 
tiation carried the paten on which rests the body 
of Christ. There are scores of instances in this 
one speech, but mention of one must suffice. 
Nothing shows Browning's understanding of 
human nature better than the last words of 
Caponsacchi, and it is a wonderful device to 
(Continued on Page 31) 



Page 16 



The CLUBWOMAN 



WEDNESDAY MORNING CLUB 



By Pauline E. Olso 

On January 20, the Wednesday Morning 
Club celebrated its twenty-eighth birthday. A 
few of the charter members were there, and 
they, more than anyone could appreciate the 
wonderful change that has been wrought in those 
twenty-eight 5'ears — from a small group of 
women meeting in each other's homes to study 
Shakespeare, to a big modern clubhouse of their 
own, with a membership of nearly three hun- 
dred and with twenty-one departments and six 
study sections. These older members are proud, 
indeed, of what has been accomplished, and see 
a wonderful future. 

Looking back over 1925, we realize what a 
busy year it was — hardly a week passed without 
some event of special interest — -even during va- 
cation the members "carried on." The year fin- 
ished in a burst of activity centered around the 
Christmas bazaar which was a huge success in 
every way, and all those who worked so hard 
felt fully repaid for their efforts. 

The first social event of 1926 occurred on 
January 8, when Mrs. Hector Zahn entertained 
forty members of the Shakespeare Alumnae at 
her home. On January 30 Mrs. F. W. Pottger, 




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by dancing and cards, with Mrs. Thomas R. 
Vaughn as dinner hostess. 

Members of the Music Section are hard at 
work on an operetta, "Cherrj' Blossoms," by 
May Hewes and John Wilson Dodge, to be 
given some time in February. Members of the 
Drama Section have started rehearsals on the 
plays to be given the last of March — in fact, 
every section is busy and 1926 promises to be 
bigger, better and busier — a banner year. 



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FEBRUARY, 1926 



Page 17 



WOMEN'S UNIVERSITY CLUB 

By Iva B. Duer 



The year started off gaily with a plunge party 
at the Surf and Sand Club, Hermosa Beach, 
January 2. It was through the .courtesy of Miss 
Elizabeth Whitcomb that this clubhouse was 
offered to the Women's University Club. Miss 
Whitcomb also directed the activities of the day. 
A varied program \vas offered. There was a 
bathing beauty parade in charge of Hildegarde 
Stivers Locke, a swimming contest in charge of 
Miss Maud Coble, and luncheon and cards. 

The International Round Table and the sec- 
tions — Drama, Music and Literature from 
month to month are offering the members an 
opportunity to follow out some line of interest. 
All the groups are alive and down to the minute 
in the appeal of their programs. 

The International Round Table group is un- 
der the direction of Miss Lloy Galpin. The 
subject for discussion in January was "The Press 
and International Relations." The speaker was 
Mrs. Mary Holland Kinkaid, associate editor 
of "Saturday Night." The references given for 
study were: Lippman, "Public Opinion"; Sal- 
mon, "The Newspaper and Authority" ; Angell, 
"The Press and the Organization of Society." 



The Drama Section is under the direction of 
Miss Mary Coble. The plays on the boards in 
New York City so far this fall were reviewed by 
Miss Casselman. This section is calling, atten- 
tion to the Prize Play Contest. A prize of 
$25 is offered for the best one-act play. The 
club has been invited to present the prize play 
at the Eisteddfod Spring Festival, the week of 
April 17. 

The Music Section meets at 10:30. A lunch- 
eon follows the program. Local composers have 
been featured. The interest this month cen- 
ters around the formation of a chorus. 

For the Literature Section, the calendar an- 
nounces the review of the book, "Anatole France, 
Himself," by Jean Jacques Bronson, Miss Les- 
lie Connor Williams is the leader. 

The West Washington and the Hollywood- 
Beverly Hills Section offer members an oppor- 
tunity to meet in a more intimate social way. 
They are really get-together and get-acquainted 
sections. From month to month something of 
interest is programmed. 

The Sunday Afternoon Tea is one of the most 
interesting features of the calendar this year. 



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The CLUBWOMAN 



The program in December was given by George 
Shkultesky, basso-cantante. He gave a group 
of Russian folk songs, selections from Tschaikow- 
sky, Rachmaninoff, and Rubinstein. The pic- 
turesque costume of his native land gave a fit- 
ting atmosphere for the program. The Janu- 
ary program is given by the prapular Mary Chris- 
tine Albin Trio. The members of this trio are 
Mary Christine Albin, piano; Evelyn Pickerell, 
violin, and Hazel Babbidge, cello. The pro- 
gram offered is: 

1. Trio in D Minor Op. 32 Arensky 

Elegia 

2. Violin Solo, Herje Kati Hubay 

3. Piano solo, Prelude in E M.moT....McDoiuell 

4. Cello Solo, Gavote Op. 112 Lee 

5. (a) Lorsque les bles dores Balakirew 

(b) Hej! Hay! Op. 30, No. 4 Dardle 

At the Thursday dinner Judge Frank Col- 
lier of the Superior Court was the speaker. He 
talked on "The Practical Workings of Our 
Courts." 

At the Tuesday luncheon Miss Lillian Gish, 
world-famous motion picture star, was the 
speaker. 

The Dance Section entertained in December 
with a Christmas party. The hostesses were 
Miss Lotta McHose, chairman ; Miss Clara 
Helen Brooks, Mrs. Benjamin Bledsoe and Mrs. 
Cora B. Freeman. There was a Christmas tree 
and a buffet supper. About sixty guests were 
present at the dance in January. The hostesses 
were Mrs. A. M. Marsh, assisted by Mrs. Vera 
B. Tomson, Miss Margaret Cornell, Mrs. 
Frank Ferguson, Mrs. Frederic F. Pendergast, 
and Mrs. R. B. Ball. 

The Clubhouse of the Women's University 
is the home this year of the Cabrillo Chapter, 
G. A. R., and the Kate Tupper Galpin Shake- 
speare Club. 



SANTA MONICA BAY 
WOMAN'S CLUB 

By Florence Coixian lo 

The "Christmas Surprise Luncheon Party" 
was one of the happiest events of the year at the 
Santa Monica Bay Woman's Club. Gay and 
unusual was the dining room where the tables 
bore as centerpieces trees and other emblems rep- 
resenting various foreign lands Italy, England, 
Wales, Scotland, Sweden, Norway, Austria, Ger- 
many were represented, as well as our own 
United States and behind each table stood women. 



natives of these lands, chosen from among the 
club members to preside over the tables. Quaint 
and colorful were the costumes and unique and 
interesting the table decorations ; most of them 
were of trees, trimmed in accordance with the 
custom of the countries represented, but Italy 
had instead a model of the stable with the man- 
ger where the Christ Child lay. As the guests 
stood waiting to be seated, strains of an old 
carol floated up the stairs and the club chorus 
entered in processional. Old songs, sweet and 
suggestive of medieval mystery sung during the 
luncheon hour, established an atmosphere full of 
Christmas feeling. 

Mrs. N. S. Duckies, president of the club, 
presided and told some of the old legends con- 
nected with the origin of some of our Christmas 
observances and then presented the hostesses from 
afar, who told of Christmas customs in the 
lands they represented. Finally a jolly old 
Santa Claus burst into the room with pack 
containing gifts for all and the child still living 
in everyone present responded gleefully. Planned 
by the president, Mrs. Duckies and the second 
vice-president. Miss Mae Armstrong, the lunch- 
eon was a very happy affair and was followed 
by a party for club children to which gifts were 
brought for the children of disabled war veterans. 

Excellent programs have characterized the 
month of January, with emphasis upon lectures 
of a serious nature. Mrs. Nancy Schoonmak- 
er's talk on "A Dream of Peace" was designed 
to set audiences thinking and thinking clearly; 
Dr. Anna Louise Strong presented "Russia To- 
day" in a most illuminating manner. At lunch- 
eon, January 4, Mrs. Alfred Graham, district 
chairman of Motion Pictures, and her entire 
committee, were guests of the club and discussed 
various phases of the motion picture problems. 

The second concert of the Philharmonic 
Series which the club is presenting in Santa 
Monica was played January 19 by the Los An- 
geles Philharmonic Orchestra with Miss Caro- 
lyn Le Fevre, violinist, as solo artist. Miss Le 
Fevre is one of Santa Monica's own daughters, 
a lovely and gifted girl, who recently made her 
first appearance with the orchestra in Los An- 
geles and received high praise from her critics. 
The club has arranged to feature Santa Monica 
artists through the entire series of concerts this 
year and is proud that the city can furnish so 
many who can pass the severe test of satisfying 
so exacting a critic as the director of the Phil- 
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Page 19 



LONG BEACH EBELL CLUB 

By Mrs. Frederick Gump, Jr., Press Chairman 



The women of Long Beach are establishing 
a precedent with the "Blossom-Time" tour to 
the Hawaiian Islands, sponsored by the Ebell 
Club of this city. This personally conducted 
tour is open to both men and women, and will 
not only embrace Honolulu and its lovely en- 
virons, but delightful motor rides around the 
island of Oahu, two days on the island of Ha- 
waii, taking in the only active volcano in "cap- 
tivity,"' Kilauea, in the Hawaii National Park, 
and splendid scenic trips. 

There will be numerous receptions and enter- 
tainments given by various organizations with 
true Hawaiian hospitality; a luau (native feast) ; 
concerts, dances, luncheons. A reception ten- 
dered the party by Governor and Mrs. W. R. 
Farrington at Washington Place, is one of the 
keenly-anticipated pleasures 'in prospect for the 
excursionists, and there is no doubt but what all 
women's organizations of Hawaii will vie with 
each other in honoring the party, because it is the 
initial excursion sponsored by a woman's club. 

The tour of the "Blossom-Time" excursion- 
ists is set for the second week in May. The day 
after the Ebell Club election, May 11, at 6:30 
a. m., a special train containing observation car 
and diner, will leave Long Beach for San Fran- 
cisco, making such stops as are necessary to pick 
up passengers for the tour. They will stop over 
night in San Francisco and sail at noon, May 12, 



on the "Matsonia" for Honolulu. Sailing from 
San Francisco gives an opportunity for club- 
women with their husbands and families all over 
the state to avail themselves of the exceptional 
opportunity. 

The trip will take either three or four weeks, 
allowing about a week on the islands, which with 
a carefully planned itinerary will be ample time 
to partake of everything that the islands have to 
offer. However, for those who might desire to 
remain longer, arrangements may be made to 
return on the following steamers, "Manoa" or 
the "Maui." 

Mrs. H. F. Burmester is the chairman of the 
Ebell's committee having charge of this trip, 
and Herbert G. Middleditch is the business 
manager, who himself has spent twenty years 
in the Hawaiian Islands. Those who wish to 
get in touch with Mr. Middleditch may do so 
by writing to his office, 205 Pacific-Southwest 
building. Long Beach, Cal. Attractive literature 
is available to those contemplating this tour. The 
175 reservations are now ready for your selec- 
tion. The price will range from $300 to $600, 
according to the kind of accommodations selected 
upon the boat. This price 'will include every- 
thing except hotel bill at San Francisco, two 
meals on the special train which is to be run 
from Long Beach to San Francisco and the 
hotel the five days in Honolulu. 



TRUSTWORTHY FIRMS 



It is with pleasure that THE CLUBWOMAN recommends to the patronage of mem- 
bers of women's clubs the Nurseries and Florists whose announcements appear on this page. 



NEW BULB CATALOGUE 

for 1924-25 now ready for distribution. It 
is free and a post card or telephone call 
will bring it immediately. 

Morris & Snow Seed Co., Inc. 

Established 1906 

853 So. San Pedro Street 

Telephone Main 3530 

LOS ANGELES CALIFORNIA 


Howard & Smith 

^aJRSERYMEN AND LANDSCAPE 

ARCHITECTS 
Phone 877-541 Ninth and Olive Sts. 

Design and Decorating TRinity 
a Specialty 7541 


TUcker 2693— Phones— TUcker 5467 

WRIGHT'S 

Flower Shop Fourth St. 
224 West Fourth St. Loa Angelea, Cal. 


SEEDS 

Headquarters for Farm and Garden 

Ornamental Plants, Shrubs and Trees 

WINSEL-GIBBS SEED CO. 

The Old Reliable Seed House 

of Los Angeles 

Main Store, 2 1 1 S. Main St. 

Phone VAndike 9532 

Nursery Yard Forty-ninth and Main 



Page 20 



The CLUBWOMAN 




Mrs. Herbert Carr, President Highland Park Ebell Club 



HIGHLAND PARK EBELL 

By Mrs. George F. Cook, Press Chairman 

Quoting a suburbanite at a men's club, Mrs. 
Herbert Carr, president of Highland Park Ebell 
Club, offered the following clever couplet in 
connection with New Year resolutions: 
"We take off our hats to the past. 
But we take off our coats to the future." 

The opening program for the new year was 
a recital given by C. Howard Paxton, tenor, 
accompanied by his wife at the piano. 

An outstanding feature of club programs for 
the 5'ear was a recent lecture by Lyman Lloyd 
Bryson, A. M., widely known author, traveler 
and lecturer, who analyzed the European situa- 
tion, taking as his subject, "The Average Citi- 
zen and Our Foreign Affairs." Clear and con- 
crete pictures were drawn of French, English, 
German and other countries. Preceding the lec- 
ture, Mrs. John Henry Van Dugteren, pianist, 
played a nocturne, "Reminiscences of Chopin," 
by Naprawnik. Miss Adelaide Prouty, mezzo 



soprano, pupil of Mrs. Van Dugteren, sang sev- 
eral attractive songs. 

On Public Affairs Day, of which Mrs. John 
H. Foley is chairman, the program was devoted 
to Child Welfare and was arranged by Mrs. 
Harry E. Lawrence, who heads that department. 
After club singing, led by Mrs. J. E. Gribble, 
with Mrs. Loj'e Holmes Miller at the piano, 
Mrs. Edmund M. Lazard, district chairman of 
Child Welfare, gave an address on "The Nor- 
mal Child." Miss Alma Wilson, assistant su- 
perintendent, Los Angeles City Playgrounds, 
sfKjke on "The Municipal Recreation," and 
Mrs. Aletha Gilbert, founder and director of 
the City Mother's Bureau, gave an address on 
"The Work of the City Mother." 

Mrs. R. W. Snell, curator of the Drama Sec- 
tion, presented a morning program consisting 
of Romance Music by Miss Patsy Forsyth, tal- 
ented violinist, and Miss Dacotah Mizener, pi- 
anist, in costume. Miss Carlisle Tupper, reader, 
pleased the audience with "Peg o' My Heart,' 
bv Manners. 



FEBRUARY, 1926 



Page 21 



After the monthly luncheon on January 5, 
Mrs. Dan Hammock, curator of the Literature 
Section, introduced Mrs. Orville Routt, district 
chairman of Literature, who gave an intensely 
interesting account of the life of Katherine Mans- 
field, with reviews of some of her short stories. 
The pathetic story of the young English author- 
ess who was only thirty-four years of age when 
she passed away three years ago from tubercu- 
losis, was most appealing. 

"The Dark Continent of American Govern- 
ment — The County," was discussed by the cura- 
tor. ^Irs. Clarence Shults, at the American Citi- 
zenship Section. 

Miss Winifred Rouzee reviewed the Book of 
I Samuel, chapter by chapter, before the Bible 
Section, Mrs. Mary D. Howard, curator. 

"Bernice," by Susan Glaspell, was read by 
Mrs. Hazel Bartlett Stevens, well-known reader 
and war entertainer, before the Drama Section, 
of which Mrs. R. W. Snell is curator. 

The Classic form in music was discussed by 
the curator, Mrs. Hzrry E. Fisher, before the 
Music Section. 

The appointment of committees and the re- 
ferring of the pending question to a committee 
were discussed by Mrs. Charles S. McKelvey at 
the Parliamentary Law Section, of ^vhirh Mrs. 
I. F. Dillman is curator. 

Acts three and four of Coriolanus were read 
at the Shakespeare Section, Mrs. C. W. Foote, 
curator, and Mrs. Lois B. Knowlton, assistant. 

On Friday evening, January 22, there was a 
reception followed by a program, when James 
^V. Foley read from his poems. From 10 to 
12 p. m. dancing and cards were enjoyed. Mrs. 
E. ^L Kromer is chairman of the Social Com- 
mittee. 

On Wednesday, January 27, the Rambler Sec- 
tion, of which Mrs. Samuel Weston Hastings is 
curator and Mrs. E. B. Machin, assistant, en- 
joyed a day with basket lunch at Exposition 
Park, with an opportunity of viewing the paint- 
ings at the Pan-American Art Exhibit. 

Paintings by Karl Yens of Laguna Art Colony 
have been enjoyed at the clubhouse the past two 
months. Mrs. William L. Judson is chairman 
of Art. 

Mrs. George E. Paine, Philanthropy chair- 
man, reported to the club gifts of forty-two 
boxes of groceries to that many families at Christ- 
mas time, besides other gifts. The Rambler 
Section filled 115 large Christmas stockings for 
the Southern California Home for Aged Women 
and others. 

Letters" endorsing the entrance of the United 
States into the World Court with reservations 
advocated by President Harding and President 
Coolidge, were sent from the club to Senators 
Shortridge and Johnson. Miss Martha Winans 
is chairman of International Relations. 




to You! 



Oeventh 

STREET, Flower and 
Figueroa, is the new 
address of Barker Bros. 
THIS is your invitation 
to visit and enjoy all 
that our new^ Lome kas 
to oflFer. 

With tHe finest of modern 
equipment and facilities 
and an intelligent, punc' 
tiliously trained staff, ■we 
are waiting to make you, 
the Club Women of South' 
ern California, truly 
"at home." 



BARKER BROS. 

Complete Furnishers of Successful Homes 
SEVENTH STREET, Flower and Figueroa 



Page 22 



The CLUBWOMAN 




Going to Church 



SOUTH SIDE EBELL CLUB 

By Edna Grace Cooke, Sub-Press Cliairman 

The South Side Ebell Club has had so much 
of interest to transpire this month that one 
scarcely knows where to begin in the telling. 

The speakers appearing before the club this 
month have been so exceptional that one cannot 
resist the temptation to make mention of several. 

Notable among them was Bishop William M. 
Bell, D. D., LL. D., who spoke on the "Values 
of the Difficult." Bishop Bell has for years 
held an enviable reputation throughout the land 
as a pulpit orator and on one occasion, when the 
late William J. Bryan was introducing him to 
an immense concourse of people, the great Com- 
moner designated the Bishop as the "greatest 
pulpit orator of the day." 

Another speaker of particular merit \\'as Owen 
C. Coy, associate professor of history at the Uni- 
versity of Southern California and director of 
the California State Jlistorical Association. In 
this year of California's Golden Jubilee, the sub- 
ject brought to the club, "California Under Six 
Flags," was one of peculiar interest and espe- 
cially pertinent of the day and honor. Mr. Coy 
held his audience absolutely spellbound while he 
related fact after fact concerning this state of 
ours, which none but those delving deep into the 
musty archives of the past knew aught con- 
cerning. 

The Dramatic Section, under the supervision 
of Kathryn Englehorn, curator, at one meeting 
rendition of their old time Rambler Song. Edna 



Meumerkel acted as toastmistress at the lunch- 
eon that followed the program and was followed 
this month presented another playlet, from the 
pen of this clever and versatile young playwright. 
Mrs. Englehorn is the author and director of 
the playlet "The Paths of the Padres," which 
the History and Landmarks Division of the Dis- 
trict Federation is using on their reciprocity pro- 
gram this j'ear. 

Speaking of the district reminds us of the fact 
that our Mrs. Frank Spring, district chairman 
of Home Economics, gave one of the most talked- 
of and interesting reports of the entire session 
at the President's Council this month. Mrs. 
Spring was for years the head of the Social Serv- 
ice Section of the South Side Ebell Club and 
has done more than any one other person in the 
club toward promoting a spirit of charity toward 
the deserving poor and accomplishing a great 
amount of real good for them. 

Last, but far from least, among the interest- 
ing affairs at the club this month was the Charter 
Day program, given on January 28. This affair 
was in honor of Mary Heiber, the club's founder, 
and May Creveling, the first president. Ap- 
pearing as speaker of the day, Dr. Jessie Rus- 
sell, who was among the first speakers ever to 
appear before the club, brought a very forceful 
message to all club women. The program was 
in charge of Mrs. Ralph Klagas, the first and 
present Music curator. Notable among those 
appearing was Marguerite Goodwin Baldwin, 
soprano, a charter member of whom South Side 
Ebell is extremely proud. The original Rambler 
Section was present almost en masse and gave a 



by responses by old-time members, who made all 
who were not fortunate enough to have been 
charter members feel they somehow had missed 
the real essence of the spirit of the South Side 
Ebell Club. 

Aside from the charter members as guests of 
honor were presidents from several other wom- 
en's clubs in the district. For a couple of years 
now South Side has been following the custom 
of inviting outside club presidents to her monthly 
luncheons and found it has been an extremely 
successful innovation, as it has been conducive 
of a much more friendly relationship between 
themselves and the various other clubs through- 
out the district. 



GALPIN SHAKESPEARE CLUB 

By Mrs. Elizabeth C. Fisher, Press Chairman 

On Wednesday, Januar}^ 13, the Kate Tupper 
Galpin Shakespeare Club held its regular meet- 
ing at the University Women's Club House, 943 
South Hoover Street. 

The theme of the meeting was the play "Julius 
Caesar" and the leader for the morning, Mrs. 
A. H. McClain, introduced the subject. 

A sketch of the condition of the Roman Re- 
public in the time of Julius Caesar was given by 
Mrs. B. A. Snow, and the trend of the meeting 
seemed to be toward the great general and his 
times rather than toward the dramatist. 

Such questions as the resemblance, if any, 
between Caesar and Mussolini were freely 
brought forward, Mrs. Utilia Bulpin, Mrs. Al- 
dis Ross, Mrs. Leila Dodson, Mrs. George Roth 
and Mrs. W. E. Silverwood taking an active 
part in the discussion. 

The well known quarrel between Brutus and 
Cassius was rendered by Mrs. R. F. Variel and 
Mrs. George Freeman. 

Vocal music for tthe occasion was furnished 
by Mrs. Dorothy Myers, accompanied by Mrs. 
Lateman. 

Luncheon was served as usual. 



CULVER CITY WOMAN'S CLUB 

By Lucille Pexton 

Culver City Woman's Club has discovered 
in its Drama and Music Sections a iorce for 
stimulating club attendance. With the begin- 
ning of this club year, a program providing for 
two monthly meetings instead of one was in- 
augurated. This meant a doubling of all the 
chiarmen's work, with the burden falling hea^•- 
ily on the shoulders of the program chairman. 

The first meetings of the month which were 
preceded by a luncheon featuring a speaker on 
some vital subject were well attended, but the 
second monthly meetings were conspicuous for 
their sparsity of attendance. To relieve the 
chairman of some part of her burden and to 
create new interest in these second monthly 
meetings, the Drama and Music Sections work- 
ing together evolved a plan which has proven of 




A soap of gentle refine- 
ment for all personal uses. 

A complexion soap that 
will aid you to retain the 
bloom of youth — the 
charm of natural beauty. 

Refresh your skin night 
and morning with a bath 
in Mission Bell. 




mm 



Page 24 



The CLUBWOMAN 



great interest to the club members and been 
the means of almost doubling club attendance. 
The program each month is under the super- 
vision of a different member of the Drama Sec- 
tion, insuring individuality of entertainment for 
the audience and providing a practical applica- 
tion for the talents "of the members of these 
sections. 

The fisst program sponsored by the sections 
was in charge of Mrs. H. H. Culver who wrote 
two clever skits typifying the Christmas spirit, 
and the musical numbers were Christmas carols 
sung by members of the Music Section under 
the direction of Mrs. Edward B. Judy. 

Mrs. Earle S. Eastham is in charge of the 
program for this month. She has planned to 
present a one-act play entitled, "That Blonde 
Person," a reading of a Chinese story and several 
musical numbers by members of the Music Sec- 
tion. 



WOMAN'S CLUB OF DOWNEY 

By Judith McKellar, Press Chairman 
During the months of November and De- 
cember the activities of the Woman's Club of 
Downey for constructive work were very marked. 
On November 18, a Spanish fiesta and luncheon 
was given, with Mrs. A. S. C. Forbes, district 
chairman of History and Landmarks, and Mrs. 
Louise J. Gillespie, chairman of Indian Welfare 
as honor guests. On December 16, honoring the 
birthday anniversary of the district president, 
Mrs. J. B. Lorbeer, the club entertained with 
a luncheon and program, the most attractive 
feature of the luncheon table being a huge birth- 
day cake made and decorated by the president. 
Mrs. Lillian B. Robinson. Present also were 
Mrs. William Waller Slaydon, Mrs. John 
Stearns Thayer, Mrs. Harry L. Stroh, Mrs. 
Charles S. McKelvey, District Board Members ; 
also Mrs. John C. Urquhart, past state presi- 
dent and at present state chairman of Con- 
servation; Mrs. Leland Atherton Irish; Mrs. 
J. W. McKellar of Los Angeles, past president 
and also one of the founders of the club; Mrs. 
Emilie Timerhoff, state chairman of Circula- 
tion; Mrs. Harry Michaels, district radio chair- 
man; and Mrs. I. N. Clendenon, also of Los 
Angeles. Community singing was led by Mrs. 
J. H. Ardis, followed by a splendid program 
arranged by Mrs. E. B. Martin, program chair- 
man. 

On December 23, a Christmas tree for the 
club children was arranged for by Mrs. J. K. 
Tweedy and on December 24, the Social Wel- 
fare Committee, with Mrs. P. S. Gewell and 
Mrs. T. A. Stromberg in charge, entertained the 
foreign mothers and children with a tree and 
exercises. 

On January 6 Hugh Pomeroy, secretary of 
the Regional Planning Commission, was the 



principal speaker, his subject being "The Am- 
erican Home." He brought a splendid message 
to the club on this subject. 

On January 13 the first of a series of lunch- 
eons to be given by the Music Sections of the 
Downey, Norwalk, Artesia and Bellflower clubs 
was held at Artesia, when Russian music was 
featured ; a Russian luncheon was also served. 
Mrs. J. B. Lorbeer, district president, Mrs. 
Harry L. Stroh, district chairman of Infor- 
mation and Reciprocity, and Ann McPherson, 
past district chairman of Music, Los Angeles 
District, were honor guests. Mrs. Lorbeer 
spoke of the opportunity for splendid commun- 
ity service afforded this group of neighboring 
clubs in this cooperative movement; and of the 
debt of gratitude each community owed to these 
organizations for the cultural work that can be 
done to bring about a higher standardization of 
music appreciation. Miss Ann McPherson gave 
a splendid talk on Russian music and musicians 
and also illustrated her talk on the folk songs 
of Russia with selections. Miss McPherson is 
a woman of charming personality and a very in- 
teresting speaker. Two choruses from the 
Downey Club were given. This co-operative 
movement planned to foster the spirit of friend- 
liness and helpfulness is already showing re- 
sults. 






COMPTON WOMAN'S CLUB 

By Mrs. J. H. Burk, Press Chairman 

The Comptoni Woman's Club has a member- 
ship of nearly one hundred. Tw^enty-three new 
names have been added during the present club 
year. 

At the first meeting in the month, a "pot-luck" 
luncheon is served and the members of the ex- 
ecutive board have their meeting. The after- 
noon is devoted to study department or cards, 
as preferred. 

At the second meeting a luncheon is served by 
the ladies, to which the public is invited. Topics 
of interest are discussed, out-of-town speakers 
heard and music by high school pupils or mem- 
bers of the club enjoyed. After the luncheon 
the regular program is carried out. All special 
committees are functioning satisfactorily. Mrs. 
Phelps of Child Welfare department co-operates 
with the City Welfare club and aided materially 
during the holiday season. 

We have recently added a History and Land- 
marks division with Mrs. Frank Walton as 
chairman. The Study division is planning a one- 
act farce, "Mrs. President and Her Cabinet," 
^vhen its members have finished their study of 
American government. 

Many social features have been carried out 
successfully which have added a modest sum to 
our building fund. 



FEBRUARY, 1926 



Page 25 



WOMEN LAWYER'S CLUB _ 

By Edna Covert Plummer, Corresponding Secretai 

The policy of the club as to meetings has been 
changed, the noon meeting on the fourth Thurs- 
day of each month being more in the nature of a 
Board meeting, while the evening meeting on 
rhe second Thursday of each month is now a 
"dinner meeting." 

The club celebrated its seventh anniversary 
as such on December 10 at the dinner given at 
the Women's Athletic Club and several of the 
past presidents were in attendance and made 
happy addresses. Among the absentees was A'liss 
Flora Belle Nelson, junior past president who is 
in the east on a business trip. 



COMMUNITY CLUB 
MICHILLINDA 



OF 



By Mrs. M. D. Roth, Press Chairman 

The motto chosen by the Community Woman's 
club of Michillinda is "Join we together for the 
common good" and in November the club joined 
with the Community Church and the Parent- 
Teacher Association in giving a bazaar which 
was very successful. 

The History, Literature, Alusic and Drama 
sections of the club are meeting at the homes of 
the members the second and fourth Wednes- 



days from 1 :30 till 4 and are interesting and 
profitable. 

The regular programs have been varied and 
enjoyable. A luncheon is ser^-ed at the second 
meeting of each month and a ways and means 
entertainment is given by one of the circles once 
a month. 

The Atheneum club, which is the Junior Aux- 
iliary, composed of young men and women to 
the number of fifty meets the second and fourth 
Fridays. Business, a parliamentary drill and a 
program are held at the first meeting and a 
social evening is held on the fourth. 



WOMAN'S CLUB OF REDONDO 
BEACH 

By Mrs. Chester H. fan Dugteren. Press Chairman 
The unpardonable sin in club life is the sin of 
bemg uninteresting. The Woman's Club of 
Redondo Beach stands before the clubs in this 
district and state this 3'ear, absolutely blameless. 
Since the opening of the club year in October 
the interesting programs have contained surprises, 
wonder, romance and adventure all blended with 
service to the club. 

The Book Section is in the eleventh year of 
existence, under the efficient guidance of Mrs. 
Margaret Frick. We are studying California 
(Continued on Page 2S) 



With 3C 

You can Overcome The 

Handicaps To Skin and Hair 

of the Hard Alkali Water in 

This Country. 

3C is the Modern, Conven- 
ient City Equivalent To 
Putting Out a If ash Tub To 
Catch Rain Water For a 
Shampoo. 




CV\am\ch\ 



COMFORT 



Also Means 

CLEANLINESS 



You Can Buy 3C At These 

Places — 

LOS ANGELES 

A. & O. 

Broadway Department Store 

The May Co. 

HOLLYWOOD 

Carty Bros. 

FLINTRIDGE 

Flintridge Grocery Co. 

BEVERLY HILLS 

R. P. O'Connor 

PASADENA 

F. C. Nash Co. 

The Model Grocery 

LONG BEACH 

The Wall Co. 

RIVERSIDE 

C. F. Elder 

Alfred M. Lewis 

Sweet Grocery Co. 



CHARM 



If you will use 3C in the water whenever you wash, your friends from the East can no longer 
This water is dreadfully hard on your skin, isn't it, my dear?" 
It is a perfect water softener and can be used with your favorite soap for bath or shampoo. 
A little in a glass of water absolutely cleans your rings. 

You Can Buy 3C At These Places 



SAN BERNARDINO 

McNeil's Grocery 

Golden Rule 

Bates Grocery 

ARCADIA 

Shular Bros. 



MONTROSE 

Hoffman- Fowler 

MONROVIA 
Kellar Grocery Co. 

SIERRA MADRE 
T. Salury 



ALTADENA 

Altadena Grocery Store 

TORRENCE 

Paige's 

WATTS 
G. J. Burger 



MONETA 

R. W. Ahlberg 

GLENDALE 

All Grocery Stores 

COLTON 

Magills 

Burton-Powell Co. 



I 



Page 26 



The CLVBfVOMAN 




GIRIS COLLEOAtt SCHOOL GUNDORA CAUIORWIA KmX HUNT ARCWTiCT ZM?CK BUNT &» KC-CSMWS. • 



NEWS OF THE SCHOOLS 

By Jean B. Kentle 

The board of directors of Pacific Military Academy 
announce the appointment of Major Willard Baldwin 
Melvin, B.S., as commandant and superintendent. 
Major Melvin comes to the academy after years of 
experience that has specially fitted him for this new 
position. 

The opening of the mid-winter term in California 
private schools is February first. Though in most 
cases, no definite break is made in the school year, 
new students are accepted at this time for the semester 
ending in June. Private tutoring enables the student 
to make up lost work when it is necessary to enter 
a little late. 

The following students of Westlake School for Girls 
expect to ride in the Fifth Annual Horse Show which 
will be held this month ; Marybelle Claggett, Ruth 
Bradford, Lucile Henderson, Beth Moreno, Janet King, 
Carolyn Bolles, Marjorie Ladewig, Patricia Janss, 
Muriel Darby will be a substitute. 



VOICE AND SILENT SINGING 

Exercises by which great singers build and restore the 

voice. Equally _ valuable for the health and spealting 

voice of those who do not sing. 

Mme. Irwin Kellogg 

Friday Morning Club House. Mondays and Fridays. 
Res. Phone WHitney 7793. FAber 1648. 



SECRETARIAL 
COACHING 

For cultured f'cople desiring personal attention. 
Refined, harmcjiious surroundings. All Secretarial 
subjects. Enter at any time. Management, Mrs. 
Frank Rutherfo d. 711 S. Vermont Ave. Fl 1763. 



TO OUR PRESS CHAIRMEN 



Articles not appearing in February issue 
of the Clubwoman were received too late and 
will appear in our next issue. 



WESTLAKE SCHOOL 

FOR GIRLS 

Resident and Day School 
333 S. Westmoreland Ave. Loa Angeles 



KENWOOD HALL 

Resident and day school for girls. Sub-primary 
through High School. Spanish, French, Expres- 
sion. Dancing included in regular tuition. 675 
S. Vermont Ave., Los Angeles. WAshington 1612. 



Los Angeles : 617.619S. Broadway 
Pasadena : Colorado at Los Robles 

Apparel for Women, Misses and Juniors 



FEBRUARY, 1926 



Page 27 



SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 

result of personal inquiry The Clubvroman takes pleasure in comniending to California 
clubwomen the schools whose announcements appear in The Clubwoman. 



NEWLY LOCATED IN GLENDORA 
FOOTHILLS 

#irlg' CoUegtate Retool 

Day and Boarding School 
Thirty-fourth year. Accredited East and 
West. New Buildings. Miss Parsons and 
Miss Dennen, Principals. Tel. Glendora 

44783. City office "Ask Mr. Foster." 

Information Service — Robinson's Dept. 
Store, 7th St. and Grand Ave. Tel. BR. 
470K 

Cumnock ^cijool 

Thirty-First Year 
School of Expression, Academy, Junior School 

Complete courses in 
Vocal Interpretation of Art 

Literature Public Speaking 

Literary Appreciation Journalism 

Story-Telling Story Writing 

Voice and Diction Dramatic Art 

Aesthetic Dancing 

HELEN A. BROOKS, Director 
53 53 West Third Street 
GRanite 3253 
GRanite 3353 Los Angeles 



University of Southern California 

Bulletins with full description of 

courses on application 

Address Registrar 

University of Southern California 

35th and University Ave. Los Angeles 



ELLIOTT SCHOOL 

FOR GIRLS 

Residence and Day School. Sub-Primary 
through Eleventh Grade. Ideal Home 
Life. Character Building. Superior Edu- 
cational Advantages. Out-Door Classes. 
MARTHA COLLINS WEAVER, Principal, 
Gramercy Place at Pico Blvd., Los Angeles 



"The Coming West Paint of the Wesf 

San Diego Army & Navy 
Academy 

The Academy enjoys the highest Scholastic rat- 
ing of the Univ. of Calif. — "Division A." It is 
under Government supervision. It emphasizes 
Christian Character Training. Address for infor- 
mation Col. Thos. A, Davis, Pres. Pacific Beach. 
Calif. 



jI{IarIborottgii ^cijool for i^irlse 

5029 W. 3rd St. Los Angeles 

Boarding and Day School 

Accredited to Eastern and Western 

Colleges 

36th Term— 1925. 
Ada S. Blake, A. B.. Principal 



PAGE MILITARY ACADEMY 

A BIG SCHOOL FOR LITTLE BOYS 

The largest of Ita class In America, Everything adapted 
to meet the needs of the smaller hoy. Five fireproof 
buildings; seven-acre campus; seventeen resident teachers. 
Here a hoy la taught self-reliance. Through military 
training he acquires habits of exactness, tiie spirit of 
team work and co-operation and also energy and Initia- 
tive — the best preparation for life, no matter what pro- 
- fession he may follow. Let our Catalogue tell you all 
a bout our school. 

ROBERT A. GIBBS, Headmaster 

1257 Cochran Avenue 

EMpIre 9103. LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



URBAN 

Military Academy 

The Great Outdoor School 

for the building of Body and Brain and Character 
with Sports and Pastimes. Under Matchless Con- 
ditions. Address the Secretary, Miss Keller, 63 7 
Wilcox Ave., Los Angeles. 



Pacific Military Academy 

Culver City 

Boarding and Day School. Beautiful new Italian 
Renaissance type buildings. Excellent Faculty. 
Out -door Classes. All athletics, swimming, gym- 
nasium, horseback riding and music. Enter any 
time in Grammar or High School. References 
required. For catalogue write Secretary or Phone 
Culver City 3294. 



The Greenwood School 

FOR GIRLS 

Select Resident and Day School. Limited Num- 
ber. In Session All Year. Principals; Mrs. M. 
Greenwood (Newnham College, Cambridge), Mr. 
H. F. Greenwood. B.A. (Corpus Christi College, 
Cambridge). 5928 Franklin Avenue, Hollywood. 



Page 28 



The CLUBWOMAN 



History in all its phases. We were very fortu- 
nate in having Mrs. Florence Dodson .Schone- 
man give her lecture on "Missions, Ranchos and 
Pueblos of Early California." She wore a beau- 
tiful Spanish shawl and mantilla that are heir- 
looms in the Sepulveda family. 

The club ship set forth on several uncharted 
seas, but with favorable winds and the staunch 
courage of the president, lone Gale Ihms, at the 
helm, it is always brought to port. Among 
the new seas sailed this year, is the Better Speech 
Section, under the direction of Mrs. J. E. Duffy. 
The new Music Section goes down to the very 
ground work, under the supervision of Miss 
Isabel Mohan. We feel we have the livest Legis- 
lation section in the district, directed by Mrs. 
Farnum Martin. She is keeping us in close touch 
with all doings of Congress, civic affairs, new 
laws and all new bills being discussed. At the 
request of Mrs. John Sherman, the new De- 
partment of American Homes was added and 
Mrs. John Mead of Los Angeles gave us a very 
interesting talk on the new department. Mrs. 
T. A. Gould was appointed chairman. The 
club co-operates with the Ex-Service League 
with Mrs. F. R. Fraley as chairman. Mrs. 
George Anderson, chairman of Philanthropy was 
able to do a great deal of good this Christmas sea- 
son. The club co-operated with several clubs in 
the Bay District to give the exsoldiers of Comp- 
ton Christmas cheer. 



CALIFORNIA HISTORY AND 
LANDMARKS CLUB 

By Mrs. E. M. Timerhoff 
It would be easy to forgive a woman as busy 
as is Mrs. Florence Dodson Schoneman, presi- 
dent of the California History and Landmarks 
Club, if she felt that guiding the club alright 
on the schedule of past successes, sufficiently 
discharged her obligations to it. Not so does 
Mrs. Schoneman however; with all her multi- 
plicity of duties, she finds time to vision and 
work toward enlargement of the membership ; 
more achieved results and quickening methods. 
In line with these, she instituted a business ses- 
sion for members only, to feature the first meet- 
ing of the ne\v year, which made January 21 
1926, from 2 to 3 p.m., memorable as the first 
California History and Landmarks clearing 
house. This spells "co-operation," that much 
overworked but correct word ; with all members 
familiar with the "vitals" of the club, an increase 
of interest in the discharging of obligations, and 
of making progress, will result. An especial 
treat at 3 o'clock was the well known speaker 
from the Historical Society of Southern Cali- 
fornia, Mr. Orra E. Monnette, in a talk on 
"The Battle of Pasqual." The entire member- 
ship regret the departure of Mrs. Catherine A. 
O'Brien for Mexico. 



WOMEN'S AUXILIARY OF THE 
RAILWAY MAIL ASSOCIA- 
TION 

By Mrs. M. I. Clemmer, Press Chairman 

The progress of the past year lays a substan- 
tial foundation for the new undertakings of 
the Women's Auxiliary of the Railway Mail 
Association. The January meeting was an en- 
thusiastic affair, centered in a luncheon at Cer- 
rano Inn. Mrs. H. H. Graham, president, 
charmingly extended greetings for the new year 
and expresses her appreciation of the work done 
by committees and individuals during the month 
of December when eighty children were given a 
delightful Christmas party in the Goodwill Day 
Nursery. 

After community singing and ,an enjoyable 
luncheon, Mrs. John B. Good, program chair- 
man, presented Benjamin J. Darneille, repre- 
sentative of the Better American Federation. 
Mr. Darneille gave a forceful talk on "Citizen- 
ship." Touching on the lives of our greatest 
statesmen, he paid a high tribute to American 
womanhood when he said these men had been 
made what they were by the influence thrown 
about them by their mothers. He emphasized 
the necessity of good home training, loyalty and 
devotion to promote real citizenship. 




SLOBEMILLSI 

Every Baking 
Purpose 




Your Grocer Has It 



JANUARY, 1925 



Page 29 




Mrs. Charles W . Schaack, President Montebello Woman's Club 



MONTEBELLO WOMAN'S 

CLUB OPENS NEW 

HOME 

By Mabel E. Kennedy, Press Chairman 

The Montebello Woman's Club of which 
Mrs. Charles W. Schaack is president, opened 
its beautiful new clubhouse Thursday, Decem- 
ber 31 with a reception and watch party. 

The building is of Spanish architecture and is 
on Park Avenue opposite Montebello City Park. 
It has a large assembly room, reception and com- 
mittee rooms, caretakers apartment and a most 
conveniently arranged kitchen. The club owns 
the lot adjoining and will later add an audi- 
torium. 

The building committee was Mrs. J. D. Min- 
tier, Mrs. N. J. Brown Jr., Mrs. Glen W. 
Smith, Mrs. B. L. Stevenson, and Mrs. J. H. 
Prescott. These splendid women have given 



much time and thought to the building of this 
attractive club home and they presided at the 
tea tables at the opening reception. 

Mrs. J. H. Lorbeer was guest of honor. Mrs. 
Herbert Parker was in charge of a very pleas- 
ing program of music and addresses. 

The reception committee was Mrs. Charles 
W. Schaack, Mrs. Thomas Darcy, club mother, 
Mrs. S. C. Hichborn, first president, Mrs. N. J. 
Brown Jr., Mrs. R. L. Fallis, Mrs. R. G. 
Brown, Mrs. C. H. H. Parker, Mrs. J. H. 
Prescott, Mrs. B. L. Stevenson, Mrs. Truman 
Cole, Mrs. Mildred S. Taylor, Mrs. M. R. 
Parmalee, Mrs. J. D. Mintier, Mrs. F. H. How- 
ard, Mrs. R. N. Bird, Mrs. J. S. Trewhella, 
Mrs. Frank H. Olds, Mrs. Glen W. Smith, 
Mrs. L. T. Williams, Mrs. George F. Bartlett, 
Mrs. Fred Sproul, Mrs. George E. Wilfert, 
Mrs. George Lane and Mrs. Charles A. 
Graham. 



Page 30 



The CLUBWOMAN 



ALHAMBRA WOMAN'S CLUB 

By Lillian M. Gilstrap, Press Chairman 

Alhambra Woman's Club, of which Mrs. 
Thomas Charles Gould is president, is well 
started on a busy half-year of carefully planned 
activities which includes closer co-operation with 
the federation and co-ordination of departments. 
Committee women are taking much interest in 
federation conferences. All programs for the 
remainder of the year are to be under direction 
of the departments. In connection with this 
change, a Public Affairs luncheon was held on 
January 28, at which the timely topic, "The 
Inheritance Tax" was discussed by an able au- 
thority. 

Forty-two new members were officially wel- 
comed into club circles January 21, when a re- 
ception and- tea was given under direction of 
Mrs. Frank Cardwell, vice president and chair- 
man of membership. Plans are being developed 
for a carnival to be given after Easter in which 
all members will participate in anticipation of 
the time, not far distant, when this club will 
need funds for a new club home. 

In an interesting comingling of altruistic and 
cultural movements the club has experienced a 
quickening along all lines during the past month 
and steady progress is the forecast for the com- 



ing season. The Art section gave an exhibition 
in October, which included paintings by well 
known local artists,' the works of Mrs. Richard 
D. Farrell, chairman of Art, Miss Laura M. D. 
Mitchell, portrait painter, Frank Tenny John- 
son, and Clyde Forsythe being displayed. The 
Civic Affairs comrnittee are sponsoring a move- 
ment designed to make the city more beautiful 
by cleaning up vacant lots and parkings and plant- 
ing on them wild flowers and shrubbery. The 
open house days are a feature of every second 
Wednesday afternoon in the month, the club 
opening the club house to all women of the 
community. 



"THE GORILLA" COMPANY 

Los Angeles playgoers will have an oppor- 
tunity at the Mason Opera House of seeing here 
"The Gorilla" which scored a sensational success 
in New York, Chicago, Boston and London, 
England. It is a satirical mystery by Ralph 
Spence, who has contributed many hits to the 
Ziegfeld "Follies" and other notable productions. 

"The Gorilla" is a combination of everything 
that has ever gone into a mystery play — shoot- 
ing, secret panels, prowling gorillas, dangling 
skeletons, hidden stairways, trap doors, and what 
not. Its outstanding characters Mr. Mulligan 




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Delivered in all Parts of Los Angeles 
and Orange Counties 



FEBRUARY, 1926 



Page 31 



and Mr. Garrity, whose ludicrous bungling is a 
source of constant laughter. The presenting 
company is a capable one and the serious manner 
in which the members act their roles is a source 
of unrestrained merriment. It was the serious- 
ness which characterizes their work that made 
the Eastern audiences roar with laughter for the 
past six months. Starting in an errie manner, the 
play works along legitimate lines until the two 
detectives appear and from that on it grows 
every minute funnier and more shockingly mys- 
terious and melodramatic. With that for ten- 
sion, the laughs become shouts, because most of 
them are developed under the most amazing 
conditions. 

One does not have to exercise his brain matter 
to follow the plot of this play, but according to 
its New York, Boston, London and Chicago rec- 
ord, it is productive of perfect irresponsible fun. 



The Ring and the Book 

(Continued from Page 15) 

which the poet has resorted. Caponsacchi has 
told his story. He persuades the court and him- 
self that it is all over, that he and Pompilia are 
"mere strangers now," that it was a matter of 
his profession as a priest, and he claims to pass 
content from this experience with Pompilia. 
Then suddenly he loses himself and utters one 
great cry : 



"O, Great, just God, Miserable me." 
Those two words, "miserable me" are more elo- 
quent than all the words he has said about the 
close of the experience. They show the irrepara- 
ble desolation of his soul. This whole process, 
with the sudden outbreak at the end, the protest 
of his heart against his intellect, is entirely in 
accordance with the facts of psychology and will 
be an inexhaustible source of interest to any 
student to look for this element in the book. 

The psychological study in Pompilia's monolog 
is perhaps keener and more subtle, and it is all 
the more remarkable in that it is a man's study 
of woman's psychology. Take for instance her 
attitude toward Guide when she says: 

"We shall not meet in this world or the next, 
But where will God be absent? In his face 
Is light, but in His shadow, healing, too : 
Let Guido touch the shadow and be healed." 
Her attitude toward Caponsacchi, "who," she 
says, "put his breast between the spears and me," 
"O, lover of my life, O soldier saint. 
No work begun shall ever pause for death ; 
Love will be helpful to, me more and more 
In the coming course, the new path I must 

tread — 
My weak hand in thy strong hand, strong for 

that." 
And leaving messages for him she says: 
"Tell him 

It was the name of him I sprang to meet 
(Continued on Page 32) 



rv^I-IEISE] are tHe positions and scores 
•^ giAren AdoHr samples in fi-ve import- 
ant and competitive contests for certified 
niilk during tHe -yeai-r 192S: 



February City Health Department, Los Angeles First 

May National Contest, Atlantic City, N. J. First 

July City Health Department, Los Angeles 

September California State Fair, Sacramento First 

ISovember Pacific Slope Dairy Show, Oakland First 



comparative 
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announced 



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97.7% 
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The quality and cleanliness of 
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Page 32 



The CLUBWOMAN 



PASADENA SHAKESPEARE CLUB 

By Mrs. Harry Coleman, Press Chairman 



Of course the children's Christmas party was 
the most enthusiastic meeting of the whole }'ear 
in the minds of the five hundred Shakespeare 
club mothers who brought their boys and girls 
to the annual festival of the club. Besides the 
delightful play put on by the dramatic club of the 
Cumnock school, there ■were apples and popcorn 
balls and a tree and a Santa Claus. Christmas 
to the less! fortunate was not forgotten by these 
same club mothers. Three huge boxes of cloth- 
ing, bedding, toys and goodies were sent to the 
Indians of Death Valley. Two hundred and 
forty Christmas boxes, each with a dollar bill 
inclosed were presented to the old ladies in the 
county farm. Thanksgiving time had seen gifts 
of jam and jellies sent to Rosemary Cottage and 
the Woman's hospital. Mrs. Leon Brockway 
is the social service chairman who inspired these 
activities. 

* » » 

Shakespeare club of Pasadena prides herself 
upon her musical programs. Something a little 
different however was the program by "some 
woman composers of Pasadena." Lue- Alice 
Keller sang a group of her own compositions. 
Miss Margaret Coleman, a daughter of that ar- 
tistic Theodore Coleman family which embraces 
Alice Coleman Batchelder also, sang a group of 
Sarah Coleman Bragdon's songs with Mrs. Brag- 
don at the piano. Miss F. Marion Ralston who 
was recently connected with the music depart- 
ment of Wellesley college but now is of Pasa- 
dena, played a piano number of lier own com- 
posing. 

^ ^ ^ 

The drama department of the Shakespeare 
club of Pasadena under the chairmanship of Mrs. 
John B. McCoy is fast surprising the member- 
ship with its development of latent talent. Mrs. 
McCoy as director of plays has presented three 
so far. The first was Charles Rann Kennedy's 
The Idol Breaker, the second was Milne's Wur- 
zel Flummery, and the third was Sheridan's 
The Rivals. The last was distinguished by the 
appearance of Mrs. Arthur Palmer of Com- 
munity Plaj'house fame as Mrs. Malaprop. Mrs. 
Palmer is one of the new members of the club. 

The plays are read and there are no costumes. 
Mrs. McCoy is clever however in suggesting a 
great deal of the acting and differentiates be- 
tween the sexes by presenting the "male" actors 
in dark gowns while the "ladies" wear light 
things. It is really astonishing how the play 

manages to "get over." 

* » -» 

The Shakespeare club of Pasadena gave a 
very interesting and artistic program over radio 
KPSN on Thursday evening, Janua'ry 21. Mrs. 



Webster French, who is the program chairman of 
the club, not only gave a delightful group of 
German songs but also, because the rules of the 
station exclude programs in a foreign language, 
made a remarkable translation of the hitherto 
untranslated Sandmaenchen of Brahams which 
she used for the first time on this occasion. The 
other artists on this program were Delia Howell 
Robinson who sang two songs composed by Nellie 
Hibler a member of the club ; the Shakespeare 
club singers themselves, Mrs. C. A. Wolf their 
director who gave a brilliant piano solo, Charles 
Hatcher who gave a group of tenor numbers and 
Mrs. Ruth Alden Braislin who delighted with 

readings. 

* -* * 

Mrs. Harry Coleman, chairman of the 
Shakespeare club's press committee, recently en- 
tertained the committee at supper at her home 
on Euclid avenue, Pasadena. Mrs. H. D. Bent- 
ley read an original production and a general 
criticism followed. Mrs. George H. Daniells 
read copies of old letters recently put in the 
hands of the Huntington library by Mrs. Dan- 
iells. These letters were interesting lights upon 
the early pioneer life in California. It is hoped 
that this committee may develop a writers' club 
within its self and to this end future evening 
meetings are planned. 



The Ring and the Book 

(Continued from Page 31) 

When came the knock, the summons and the 
end." 

And her last words are still of him: 
"So let him wait God's instant men call years; 
Meantime hold hard by truth and his great soul, 
Do out the duty — through such souls alone 
God stooping shows sufficient of His light 
For us in the dark to rise by. And I rise." 

In one of Caponsacchi's references to Guido 
he uses a figure extreme in its audacit\-. Guido's 
existence was an insult to God. And so Capon- 
sacchi says that, if he had killed Guido at Castcl- 
nuovo : 

"There had he laid, abolished with his life. 
Creation purged o' the miscreate, Man redeemed, 
A spittle wipied off from the face of God." 

One of the greatest things in the whole poem 
is the Pope's moral courage. Guido, condemned 
to death by the law, appeals from the law to the 
head of the church, because, being half ecclesias- 
tic, his death can only finally be decided by the 
ecclesiastical arm. The Pope is an old, feeble 
man, expecting to die any day, but his judgment 
is clear, his sentence determined. His eyes clear 
of quarrels, conventions, class prejudice, the 
(Continued on Page 34-) 



FEBRUARY, 1926 



Page 33 



Directory of California Products 

For tKe convenience of the seventy thousand clubwomen of California and the many others 
who have enthusiastically subscribed to the campaign of the women's clubs to promote in every pos- 
sible way the use by Californians of California products. The Clubw^oman, mouthpiece of the cam- 
paign, presents the following partial classified list of Classified products. In planning their shop- 
ping, clubw^omen will find this list handy reference guide to what to order in carrying out their 
pledge to buy Califronia-made goods w^herever possible. 



AWNINGS 

Acme Tent and Awning Co. — Canopies. 
4069 Mission Road, Los Angeles. Tele- 
phone CApitol 7380. 

BUILDING MATERIALS 

Doors-Sash-Screens — Veneered Doors, High 
Grade Interior Finish — Pacific Door & 
Sash Co. 

Hardwood Floor Finishers and Contractors 
— National Floor Co., Los Angeles. 

Mirrors, Sand, Plaster, Vitrolite — Raphael 
Glass Co., Los Angeles. 

Pioneer Paper Co., Manufacturers of Roof- 
ings. 

Sash-Doors-Hardwoods-Hardware — Frank 
Graves Sash, Door and Mill Co. 

CLOTHING 
"Ribstitched, 



Bathing Suits 
Pacific Knitting Mills, Los 



"Bentsknit,' 
and Sweaters 
Angeles. 

"Summers Quality" outing and work cloth- 
ing for men and boys — Summers Mfg. 
Co., Inc. 

CARPET CLEANING 

City Steam Carpet Cleaning Works, John 
Bloesftr, Main 0430. New Rugs. 

FOODS 

Biscuits, crackers, etc. — Pacific Coast Bis- 
cuit Co., Los Angeles. 

Capitol Products, flour, etc. — Capitol Mill- 
ing Co., Los Angeles. 

Carson-Baruch Baking Co., Inc., Wholesale 
Bakers, 3545 Pasadena Ave., Los Ange- 
les. Capitol 5 770. 

Christopher Co., L. J. — Quality Ice Cream 
and Candies. 

Faultless Bread — "Let your daily bread be 
Faultless." Faultless Bread Bakery, Los 
Angeles. 

Globe "Al" Flour, Macaroni Products and 
Cereals — Globe Grain and Milling Co., 
Los Angeles. 

Iris Brand "Over 200 Wonderful Things to 
ELat" — Distributed by Haas, Baruch & 
Co., Los Angeles. 

Morola — Nut Margarine, Morris & Co., Los 
Angeles. 



Olson's Bread, "O So Good" — Olson Bak- 
ing Co., Los Angeles. 

Puritas Vacuum-packed Coffee — a Los An- 
geles product, at most grocers. 

Miss Saylor's, Inc., Unusual Chocolates, 
6752 Venice Blvd., Culver City. 

FURNITURE AND HOUSE FITTINGS 
Barker Bros., 716-738 South Broadway — 
Complete Furnishers of Successful Homes 
— Our "Own Make" and "Mastermade" 
Upholstered Furniture and Hand-tailored, 
"individualized" Mattresses and Box 
Springs. 
Inglewood Furniture — Inglewood Manufac- 
turing Co., Inglewood, Cal. 
Kling Furniture — Kling Manufacturing Co., 

Los Angeles. 
Kwality Pillows, etc. — Kwality Feather Co., 
Los Angeles. 

Los Angeles Can Co. — Manufacturers of 
Tin Cans for all purposes. 
Sanotuf Mattress, furniture — Roberti Bros., 

Los Angeles. 
■ Stockwell Neverstretch Mattress — L. W. 

Stockwell Co., Los Angeles. 
Upholstered Furniture — Soronow's Furni- 
ture Manufacturing Co., Los Angeles. 
Window Shades — ^Window Shade Products 
Company, 910 East Fourth St., Los An- 
geles. 
"Zenith" Upholstered Furniture and Mat- 
tresses — Bailey -Schmitz Co., Los An- 
geles. 
Citizens Independent Ice & Cold Storage 
Co., 61 0-620 South Raymond Ave., Pasa- 
dena, California. Phone Colorado 30. 

GASOLINE AND MOTOR OIL 
Ventura Gasoline "California's Best," Ven- 
tura Motor Oil (Paraffin-Base) — Ventura 
Refining Co., Los Angeles. 

MOTOR TRUCKS 
Moreland Motor Truck Co., Los Angeles. 

STORAGE BATTERIES 
Hobbs Storage Batteries, Hobbs Storage 
Battery Corp., Los Angeles. 

WATER HEATERS 
De Luxe and Supreme Gas Water Heaters 
— General Water Heater Corp., 1601 
Compton Ave. 



Page 34 



The CLVBWOMAl^ 



THE SOROPTIMIST CLUB OF 
LOS ANGELES 

By Alice Mavor Edwards 

Our Service Fund has been the center of our 
club activities for the past few months. At a 
Harvest meeting held during Thanksgiving week, 
we had highly amusing reports on the way in 
which at least $5.00 per member had been saved 
or earned. Our president, Mrs. Gertrude C. 
Maynard, had been splashed with flecks of paint 
for weeks as she painted her own cottage fur- 
niture ; one member, a dentist, actually filled her 
own tooth ; our editor shamelessly peddled home- 
baked cookies and brown bread ; one member 
talked a policeman out of putting a tag on her 
car, turning in only $4.50 to the fund, because, 
she explained, the cigars cost the other 50c. 
Some did laundry or remodelled coats or made 
dresses; or stayed home from football games, or 
eschewed taxis ; or like one cheerful soul, just 
garnered dimes, a few at a time, from a perfectly 
good husband's pockets; any way was good 
enough. Several beautiful articles \vere con- 
tributed for sale by auction or raffle, and all 
told, the total was something like $550 for the 
special offerings, the grand total being well over 
$1000. This as a revolving loan will, we hope, 
help some ambitious and talented girl to the at- 
tainment of her dearest dream. 

We have established, under Mrs. Maynard's 
generalship, a four page weekly bulletin. The 
Los Angeles Soroptimist, which carries the pro- 
gram for luncheon meetings held each Tuesday 
in the Music Room of The Biltmore ; has a 
resume of the last week's meeting, an illustrated 
biographical sketch, letters from other Sorop- 
timist clubs, personals ; a clearing house column 
of jokes and verse and club suggestions ; and 
general federation news. A historical study of 
Woman Onward and Upward" is given by M. 
Barbara Dacier of the Southwest Museum. It 
is supported by advertisements, and has been 
the means of better acquaintance in our mem- 
bership. We're just a bit chesty about it, since 
we are a very new organization. 

In the past itw months several more Sorop- 
timist Clubs have been organized, Seattle, Spo- 
kane, and Kansas City being most prominent. 



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The Soroptimist IDEA was expressed by Mrs. 
Maynard in a recent address to the club, in which 
she said : "You have put into actual working 
this year, the spirit of loj'alty and co-operation, 
combined with tolerance, and based upon service, 
which is the foundation of our club." 

Service, Loyalty, Co-operation, Tolerance — 
isn't it a slogan worth living up to? 



The Ring and the Book 

(Continued from Page 32) 

Pope has gone over all the cases during the day 
and now night has fallen He has been on the 
terrace to look at the stars and their solemn peace 
is with him, and now he is sitting in the stillness 
of his closet feeling that he is alone with God 
and his old age. He passes Guido and the rest 
before his spiritual tribunal, judging not from 
the legal point of view, but from what his Mas- 
ter would take on Judgment Day. And on 
these lines he delivers his sentence on Pompilia, 
Caponsacchi, Guido and the rest. He declares 
that having used the best judgment God has 
given him, he will not shrink from meeting 
Guido's spirit in the world to come, even if it 
turns out that Guido is as innocent as a babe. 
He even says that believing Guido guilty, he 
would not dare to die and face God leaving 
Guido without suffering the penalty of his crime. 
And this is what he will say to Guido's ghost: 
"God who set me to judge thee meted out 
So much of judging faculty, no more; 
Ask Him if I was slack of use thereof." 
This solemn, silent, unworldly judgment of 
the whole case, done in God's presence, is, after 
the noisy, crowded, worldly judgment of it by 
Rome, after the rude rumors of the law, and 
the terrible clashing of human passions, most 
impressive; it rises into the majesty of old age 
in the summing up of the characters of Pompilia, 
Guido and Caponsacchi. The Pope is touched 
by Pompilia's character, "perfect in whiteness" 
in the midst of the world's wickedness. He said 
to her: 

"Stoop thou down, child, 

Give one good moment to the poor old Pope, 
Heartsick at having all his world to blame." 
And farther on, 
"The marvel of a soul like thine, earth's flower, 
She holds up to the softened gaze of God." 

Indeed, since 1868, when Pompilia appeared 
before the world, she has captured the imagina- 
tion the conscience, the sentiment of all who love 
womanhood and poetry. Born of a harlot, she 
is a star of purity and in this lovely character 
Browning seems to have disdained all the phil- 
osophy of heredity and environment. 



J^^ 



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MARCH, 1926 



No. 6 



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THE CLU 



^N 



Vol. XVI 
Published Monthly 



MARCH, 1926 



No. 6 



Office, 706 Pacific Southwest Bank Bldg. 
Telephone EL. 2734; if no answer, EL. 1170 
Mail Address Box 26, South Pasadena, Cal. 

Subscription Price 50 Cents Per Year, Ten Cents the Copy Send subscriptions to Mrs. Bert Clifford, Box 26, 

South Pasadena, Cal. 
Edited by the Press Chairmen of the Clubs Represented 
Entered at the South Pasadena Postoffice as second-class matter. 



Gleason's Parliamentary Digest 

1110 West 30th Street 
Los Angeles, California 

Cloth Cover Digests, per copy $2.00 

Paper Cover Digests, per copy $1.50 

"Lesson Drill Number One" 

A Lesson in Parliamentary Practice 

Just Off the Press. 

5 Cents per copy, 50 cents per dozen copies 

INGLEWOOD WOMAN'S CLUB 

By Mrs. Jessie Kotterman, Press Ciiairman 

Inglewood Woman's Club is having a most 
successful }'ear of accomplishment, materially 
and morally. Its acti-saties have been remuner- 
ative to the club and beneficial to the community. 
The burden of debt incident to the new club- 
house is constantly being lightened, much to the 
gratification of the president, Mrs. Elida M. 
Scoville, and the membership. Mrs. Scoville 
thinks the ways and means committee of the In- 
glewood club is surpassingly effective, and prob- 
ably the best in the district. 

The membership has never failed to respond 
to calls made upon it for community service, and 
has cooperated ■with the Ingle^vood Chamber of 
Commerce in every- way in which an organiza- 
tion of its character and scope could be helpful. 
Club officers feel that the Community Chest 
Drive, and elaborate plans for the entertainment 
of shut-ins at Christmas could not have been 
the outstanding successes that they were without 
the active assistance and cooperation of the club 
membership. The Community Welfare Com- 
mittee of the club had much to do Avith these af- 
fairs. 

Members of the Philanthropy Committee and 
individual club members assisted the service 




Gifts 
From the Orient 

Tai Chan Co. 

Cloissone, Brass, Lac- 
quer, Porcelain, Kimo- 
nos, Haori and Man- 
darin Coats, Oriental 
Jewelry, Novelties. 

621 So. Flower St., L. A. 
(3 Doors No. of The Elite) 



clubs with donations and helped in assembling 
great baskets of food and delicacies for the needy 
on Christmas Eve. The success of an advertis- 
ing campaign was assured ^vhen members of the 
club assisted the Chamber of Commerce in detail 
■ivork connected with it. 

A shower conducted for the benefit of the Day 
Nursery maintained at Sawtelle for children of 
veterans was eminently successful, and plans are 
under way for an entertainment to be given at 
Compton for the service men under treatment 
at a sanitarium there. 

A large body of club members and their 
friends recently attended an evening showing of 
"The Big Parade" at Grauman's Eg\'ptian Thea- 
ter, Holly^vood. The arrangement was made by 
the Motion Picture Committee of the club, and 
provided that a part of the admission charge 
should be given to the club. This resulted in a 
good profit for the club, and the event was of 
advertising to the Ingle^vood community. 

Late in February arrangements had been per- 
fected for the club to take part in entertaining 
the State President, Dr. Marian A. Bertola, co- 
operating with the Redondo Beach Woman's 
Club. Reciprocity is to be observed on March 
3, and a program of special moment is pre- 
pared for this event. 

A new section of the club devoted to conser- 



Page 4 



The CLUBWOMAN 



vation has been notably successful this year. The 
Bird and Flower division has been helpful in 
creating a noteworthy spirit of civic pride. Last 
fall prizes were awarded for the best kept va- 
cant lot, the most beautiful flower beds, and the 
most attractive backyard. Besides this, the sec- 
tion has largely increased the interest of its mem- 
bers in the study of bird life. 

President Scoville is what a good Rotarian 
would call a "good mixer" or a "right guy." 
She believes in friendliness and that " 'Tis the 
human touch in this world that counts ; the touch 
of j'our hand and mine." Her slogan for the 
year has been: "Friendliness is the first step to 
cooperation." 



AVERILL STUDY CLUB 

By Clara S. Wardner, Press Chairman 
Current events are now being especially fea- 
tured at the meetings of the Averill Study Club. 
Mrs. George Horr, Mrs. Lucy Adams, Mrs. 
Anna Smith, and Mrs. James Bryan were the 
leaders for the current event hour during Janu- 
ary. These leaders have not only given to the 
club splendid resumes of the news of the day 
but have created interest and stimulated discus- 
sions. 

"Conservation" was the subject of Mrs. John 
C. Urquhart's address to the club, January 12. 
Mrs. Emma Henrj', Mrs. F. A. Burlingame, and 



L. W. Stockwefl Co. 

Manufacturer* of 

Stockwell Never 
Stretch Mattress 

%. 

Makes Any Bed 
A Better Bed 



Los Angeles 



California 



Mrs. Anna Smith, members of the club, pro- 
vided the program for "Books and Magazines 
Day," January 19. The Drama section, under 
the direction of Mrs. W. A. Miller gave a play- 
ette, "How the Story Grew," January 26. 

Mrs. Lucy Holmes Adams entertained the 
members of the Averill Study Club, Tuesday, 
February 9, at her home on La Salle avenue, 
the occasion being an "Afternoon With Her An- 
tiques." 

Mrs. Adams' home contains a notable collec- 
tion of early American and English furniture, 
high-boys, desks, Windsor chairs, mirrors, china, 
silver and candelabra. The hostess gave a brief 
talk about some of her treasures and how they 
were acquired. 

The program consisted of old poems, old songs 
and reminiscences. Mrs. C. P. Dodge read the 
account of the death of Abraham Lincoln that 
appeared in the April 25 issue of the New York 
Herald. Mrs. F. A. Burlingame read from old 
family letters. Mrs. Emma Henry sang bits 
from the old melodies. 

Mrs. Adams and Mrs. Carpenter, the assist- 
ing hostess, were quaint and old-fashioned in 
silken gowns of the days of "61." Dresses dat- 
ing back twenty, thirty and forty years were in 
evidence at the party. 

Delicious refreshments of salad, sandwiches, 
home-made cake, and coffee ■were served. 




Made by the Beikers of 
Snow Flakes 
Baked in the largest and most modem 
English type traveling oven in the west. 
May be purchased also by pound or 
package from most grocers on the 
Pacific Coast. 

SHORTIE TIFFIN 

OXFORD ARROWROOT 

PETIT BEURRE DUNDEE 

BUFORD AVON 

ORANGE NECTAR 
PANAMA CREAM 

PACIFIC COAST BISCUIT CO. 



Los Angeles 

Sacramento 
Seattle Tacoma 



San Francisco 
Portland 

Spokane 



MARCH, 1926 



Page 5 



Kj!'^ 



Contents 



f^^_y 



Inglewood Woman's Club 3 

Averill Study Club 4 

Artesia Woman's Club 5 

Los Angeles Ebell..._ 6 

Friday Morning Club 10 

Soroptimist Club _ 12 

Woman's Club of Hollywood 13 

The Pasadena Shakespeare Club _ 17 

Los Angeles Section Council of Jewish Women.... 18 

Santa Monica Bay Woman's Club _ 19 

Highland Park Ebell _.:. 20 

Long Beach Ebell.. 21 

Wednesday Morning Club 22 

College Women's Club of Long Beach 22 

Beverley Hills Wonina's Club 23 

Women's Twentieth Century Club 24 

Kate Tapper Galpin Shakespeare Club 24 

South Side Ebell.... _.... _. 25 

Montebello Woman's Club 28 

Newhall Woman's Club 29 

California History and Landmarks Study Club 29 

Letter Carriers' Auxiliary 29 

Calfiornia History and Landmarks Club..._ 30 

Railway Mail Auxiliary 31 

Gleason's Parliamentary Club 3t 

Woman's Club of Downey 32 

The Neptunian Club 32 

Mary Williams Club..._ 34 



ARTESIA WOMAN'S CLUB 

By Rosella Bolt, Press Chairman 

Artesia Woman's Club was hostess Wednes- 
day, January 13, in the first of a series of lunch- 
eons that have been inaugurated by the Music 
sections of Artesia, Downey, Norwalk and Bell- 
flower clubs. 

This luncheon, which was of Russian type, 
was given in the parlors of the M .E. Church 
and was attended and participated in by the 
largest number of club ladies yet entertained 
here. Mrs. Lee, local president, presided over 
the meeting. 

Mrs. G. R. Frampton, program chairman, and 
Mrs. P. F. Haskell, music chairman, of Artesia 
Club, had arranged a splendid program for the 
afternoon. The outstanding feature was a talk 
on Russian music made by Miss Ann McPher- 
son, past district chairman of Music. 

Short talks were given by Mrs. Lorbeer, presi- 
dent of Los Angeles District; Mrs. Stroh, district 
program chairman; Mrs. Atherton Irish, district 
secretary of Music. 

A fine program of Russian music was also 
given, consisting of solos and two numbers by 
chorus from the Downey club. 









^ti 


jeatured at 

^^k the \Jille de 

^^^A 1 arts: 

^^H Irene 
^^P Castle 

f^W "Corticelli" 
jf^ Dresses 

ryUE chic of "America's 
1 best -dressed women" — 
and the most authentic 
modes of Spring are reflect- 
ed in these smart coats and 
dresses, exclusive in Lois 
Angeles at the Ville ! 
Third Floor 

5Eve.NTH^~^ATOUVE ^ 

aiLDYAS CO. 











GOOD BOOKS 
FOR BOYS AND GIRLS 

ALL THE YEAR 

Not only for Children's 
Book Week 

Send for our New Graded Catalogue 

Also 

Book Shelf for the "Teen-Age" Girl 



Opposite The JONES 426-428 

Pershing T-> /-^ /'"N r/- O VfeBt. 

Square hJUvJJS. otOrC Sixth 

Lo« Angeles, California 



Page 6 



The CLUBWOMAN 



•Bo^ -jiweeif G^ -edeiiii 



A Resume of Dr. Leta Hollingsworth's "The Psychology of the Subnormal 

Child" 

By Mrs. Edgar S. Stanley, Curator of Psychology, Ebell Club 



Normality is what the greatest number of in- 
dividuals do; those who deviate in the direction 
of inferiority are called subnormal. An individ- 
ual may be subnormal in different respects — in 
emotional control, in moral sense, or in a special 
function, such as arithmetic, spelling, reading, or 
music. The phenomena of individual differences 
is very much more apparent in mental tracts than 
in physical, and the curve of distribution is slight- 
ly weighted at the lower end, because disease and 
accident can operate to reduce a mentality that 
was potentially normal or superior. But we know 
of no external influence that can operate to raise 
a low or mediocre mentality to higher levels. 
The subnormals, as well as the mediocre and 
superior individuals, result from the operation of 
the laAvs of heredity and variation. 

The subjective standard of what constitutes 
normal intelligence is apparently lower for girls 
than it is for boys — because social and economic 
pressure bears so unequally upon the sexes. Boys, 
having greater freedom, are less restrained than 
girls, and because of this they come into conflict 
with their environment. This maladjustment 
makes it imperative that some explanation of 
their condition be s6ught. Then too, men form 
a highly competitive class — working in rivalry 
with each other for a wage, and a boy who can- 
not compete becomes an object of concern — while 
the girl who cannot compete is not so often recog- 
nized as defective, since it is not unnatural for 
her to drop into the non-competitive life of the 
home. Often she marries, thus fastening herself 
to economic support. Also, with girls and wom- 
en, sex, as a commercial asset, offers ways of sur- 
viving without much regard to intellectual status. 

A considerable majority of feeble-minded chil- 
dren come from inferior homes — the most rea- 
sonable explanation of the relationship between 
feeble-mindedness and low grade environment is 
that feeble-minded parents produce feeble-minded 
children, and they also maintain inferior homes. 

The significance of subnormal children, both 
for the social life of their day, and for the future 
history of civilization is very great. They con- 
stitute a great burden, both economically and so- 
cially. Crime, delinquency, alcoholism, and the 
problem of the unmarried mother, are all closely 
related to mental deficiency. In our own state, 
in which the problem has been studied with spe- 
cial care, it is stated on conservative reckoning. 



that more than twenty-five per cent of the in- 
mates of reform schools, children in juvenile 
courts, and convicts in San Quentin, are feeble- 
minded. Dr. Terman^ of Stanford, estimates 
that feeble-minded criminals and misdemeanants 
cost California annually two million dollars — 
beside the loss accruing from the part played by 
feeble-mindedness in alcoholism, pauperism, pros- 
titution and disease. 

The subnormal child is potentially a social 
menace, and should be identified and studied 
while young, in order that he may be trained in 
useful specific habits up to the limits of his ca- 
pacity, and in order that those who are incapable 
of any social adjustment may be protected from 
miserable and delinquent careers. 

While demented children also register low in 
intellectual status, their condition differs essen- 
tially from that of the feeble-minded, in origin, 
outcome, and treatment, the feeble-minded child 
never having had a normal mental capacity ; 
whereas the demented child has, at a former 
time, had greater mental capacity than that which 
characterizes him subsequently. 

Instead of defining an individual's mental ca- 
pacity in terms of chronological age, we are tend- 
ing to defining him as being feeble-minded if his 
intelligence quotient originally is seventy per cent 
or less — and whose status falls in the lowest two 
per cent of human intellect. Classified in the 
terms of the I. Q., idiots grade from to 20% — 
imbeciles from 20 to 40% — and morons from 40 
to 70%. Imbeciles and morons are subdivided 
into low-grade, mid-grade, and high-grade. In- 
dividuals having an I. Q., of between 70 and 
85 per cent are called "border-liners". The ma- 
jority of the defective escape detection by the 
populace at large. 

Binet, Professor of Psychology in the Univer- 
sity of Paris, in 1904 partook the formulation of 
a scale of mental tests, on the basis of objective 
experiment. In 1908 the scale was presented in 
terms of mental age. In 1911, he published a 
second revision of his scale. Death prevented his 
perfecting his idea; but his researches had been 
read by psychologists all over the civilized world, 
and others took up the task of perfecting and ex- 
tending his scale. 

In 1915 Drs. Yerkes, Bridges, and Hartwick, 
(Americans), revised the Binet scale consider- 
ably — the chief feature of their scale being to 



MARCH, 1926 



Page 7 



measure by points, instead of by years of mental 
age. However, in order to render the results 
intelligible, the points must always be translated 
back again into terms of mental age. The Stan- 
ford scale, the work of Dr. Terman, probably is 
the best available. It measures intelligence up 
to, and including, adult. The I. Q., is intro- 
duced as the expression of intellectual status — or 
quantity. 

The underlying causes of mental deficiency 
must be sought in a developmental history, a fam- 
ily history, a school history, a neurological exami- 
nation, and a sensory examination. 

The feeble-minded differ from ordinary chil- 
dren only in amount of ability, not kind of abili- 
ties they possess — and one is not technically 
called feeble-minded whose ultimate intellectual 
level is over twelve years. This intellectual level 
is equivalent to work done in the sixth grade. 
From the viewpoint of social expediency, which 
always implies also the welfare of the individual, 
it is a question whether the feeble-minded should 
be trained in manual work only, or be taught to 
"read, write and cipher" to the extent of their 
capacity for mental growth. 

By mental grow-th is meant that gradual in- 
crease of capacity for learning which comes as 
the result of the development of the nervous sys- 
tem, apart from all training. The nervous sys- 
tem, which is the physiological basis of mental 
life, does not continue to grow indefinitely. The 
observaf'ons of psychologists and neurologists do 
not, as yev, seem to justify stating an exact age at 
which mental growth, on the average ceases, ex- 
cept, most probably, that it lies bet^veen thirteen 
and twenty. Such advantage as an adult has 
over a young person consists in additional knowl- 
edge, experience, and helpful specific habits — not 
in additional capacity' for learning new things, 
which are equally unfamiliar to both. 

Binet says "intelligence is the ability to adapt 
behavior to the successful attainment of desired 
ends". Stern defines intelligence as the "general 
adaptabilitv to new problems and conditions of 
life." 

Mental deficients, as a group, are inferior to 
the norms in all respects, but less so in physical 
size and strength, in sensory acuity, and motor 
control. They are farthest removed in intellec- 
tual capacit}' — being much more inferior in deal- 
ing with ideas — (abstract thinking) — than with 
things. Individually considered, defectives show 
more or less unevenness of abilities — and in a 
class called "idiot savants", (of which there are 
few), extreme unevenness is shown. The spe- 
cial talents of this class usually are ability to 
draw, to play musical instruments, to memorize 
by note, and to perform feats of arithmetical cal- 
culation. 

There are certain physical anomalies which 
sometimes accompany mental deficiency; though 




Mrs. Edgar S. Stanley, Curator, Psychology, Ebell Cluh 

defectives are sometimes quite handsome. Mon- 
golians and microcephalics are distinct types. 

As moral conduct is dependent upon man's 
ability to comprehend ideas, and his capacity to 
profit by experience, or conscious purpose, and 
thought of consequence, which can only be appre- 
hended by the intelligence — the mentally deficient 
cannot be depended upon to make the proper 
moral adjustment. They show extreme degrees 
of submissive and aggressive behavior in response 
to situations which call these reactions forth. 

Feeble-mindedness, being hereditary, two gen- 
eral schemes have been proposed for reducing the 
number of defectives born, ( 1 ) the segregation 
of all mentally defective adults during the repro- 
ductive period, and (2) artificial sterilization by 
surgical means. The objections to the first are 
largely economic, to the second sentimental. 

About ten per cent of the mentally subnormal 
are said to be secondary cases, meaning, that the 
condition is the consequence of some underlying 
misfortune to the nervous tissue, but for \vhich 
the child would have been of normal intelligence. 
Very few of them appear in the schools, except 
possibly epileptics, and cretins, being of too low 
a grade mentally, besides often being crippled. 
Secondary feeble-mindedness is not hereditary, as 
the cause was external, rather than a matter of 



Page 8 



The CLVBWOMAS 



the constitution of the germ-plasm. This fact is 
probably of importance only in the case of rela- 
tives. 

Mental conflicts are fewer among mental defi- 
cients, because the louver the intelligence the 
simpler the mental life. 

It is interesting to know that California is 
among the specially progressive states in the 
provision for abnormal children — in clinics and 
special classes — the functions of which are the 
identification, (or diagnosis) of the child, and its 
training up to the limits of its capacity, in a way 
which best enables its adaptation to life and eco- 
nomic independence. 

EBELL NOTES 

By Mrs. Emma B. Keepers, Press Chairman 

Nearly all the seven arts are developed or at- 
tempted in the Ebell "curriculum". Literature, 
Drama, Music, Art, Language, Psychology, Pub- 
lic Affairs, Shakespeare, Browning, Bible, Better 
American Speech ,and a few side issues, which 
taken seriously might well equal a university ex- 
tension course. 

Who knows but that we may in the end evolve 
a method whereby we may reach a degree of ac- 
cepted standards? 

Always in the club rooms are exhibitions of 
various kinds. This month we have in the audi- 
ence room the canvasses of Franz A. Bischoff, 
who began his career in Austria. 

Herman Amlauer has an exhibit of black and 
white portraits, where the junior members are 
in a goodly majority. Some day we hope to see 
this whimsical man's work in oil — for he has the 
talent to accomplish it, with his genius for catch- 
ing the essential qualities of likeness. 

EBELL JUNIORS 
By Mrs. L. IV. Bahcock, President Ebell Junior 

The Ebell Juniors, a special department of 
Ebell and having special privileges, was organized 
in 1921 with about forty charter members. The 
membership now totals over one hundred and 
eighty. 

The purpose of this special department is the 
advancement in all lines of general culture and 
the participation in social welfare work. 

In line with general culture we are privileged 
to attend all the many departments of Ebell and 
a limited number of Juniors may attend each 
Monday meeting. 

Our own programs at our monthly meetings 
are planned to be cultural as well as entertaining. 
Three of the Junior programs for this year are 
to be given by talented members from our own 
group. 

We have also been asked to give a regular 
Monday program for Ebell. 



In line with social welfare work, we have es- 
tablished this year a Child Welfare Department. 
This department works through the Scholarship 
and Practical Relief Departments of Ebell. 

The Junior Board of Governors is composed 
of the Junior ofHcers and three advisory mem- 
bers who are regular members of Ebell. This 
board meets monthly and determines the policies 
of the Junior Department. 

The work of our Junior department is in the 
hands of twelve committees each with a chair- 
man, assistant chairman and eight to ten assist- 
ant members. 

These chairmen and assistants were chosen 
from our club survey. 

The material in this survey w^as collected dur- 
ing the summer. This survey not only shows 
the correct address and telephone number of each 
member but it also notes the time each member 
has to give to club work and the committees with 
which she prefers to work. One-half of our 
members asked for child welfare work. 

As far as possible we have placed the girls on 
the committees they asked for in the survey. This 
plan has been a decided success, and different 
committees have worked together wherever a 
mutual interest united them. 

When our benefits committee wants to give 
a benefit, they can have the assistance of the 
dance committee, ticket committee, card party 
committee, fashion show committee, and special 
program committee. In this way two to six 
committees are available to work on each benefit. 

Three benefits have been planned for this year, 
a society circus, a St. Patrick Day dinner dance, 
and a large bridge luncheon. 

Our card party committee is not only avail- 
able to assist with a benefit when needed but 
each month this committee gives a bridge party 
for the Junior members so that they may become 
better acquainted. These parties are given at the 
home of one of the members. 

Our drama committee works through the 
Drama Workshop of Ebell. This committee 
with its chairman, acting as director has pre- 
sented four plays and will present a three-act 
play for the regular Junior meeting in May. 

Our poster committee paints the posters to ad- 
vertise our benefits. 

Our program committee provides the program 
for our monthly meetings and assist in providing 
talent for benefits and luncheons. 

Our publicity is taken care of by a publicity, 
chairman. 

Our social welfare committee investigates 
cases that come to its attention and gives what 
assistance it deems essential. This committee is 
assisting two families this year. One family has 
seven children ; the other family has five children. 

The girls meet twice a month, and sew and 



MARCH, 1926 



Page 9 



donate articles that are needed. This committee 
also sent sixty Christmas gifts to the Christmas 
tree for the orphans of the World War Veterans. 

Our telephone committee reminds members 
who miss meetings of the next meeting and as- 
sists in other ways. 

All the chairmen and their assitants have 
given us their sincere support. It has been a 
pleasure to work with them. We could name 
any number of girls and cite instances of their 
splendid deeds, but we are only going to name 
one, that is our secretary, Mrs. Dudley Frank. 
She has always been ready for every emergency 
and we shall not soon forget her unfailing and 
splendid support during this club year. We are 
very happy in our Junior Department, and we 
sincerely appreciate the love and guidance that 
our dear president, Mrs. Read, has shown us. 
We are also grateful for the support and encour- 
agement that we have received from our advisory 
board. We are especially appreciative of Mrs. 
Patrick Campbell for the time and thought she 
has given us. 

We, the Juniors, realize that we are special 
members of Ebell, and that first of all, we owe 
our allegiance to Ebell ; and second, that it is 
only natural that our thoughts and efforts should 
find, at the present time, an outlet through the 
Junior department. But after a few years in 
the Junior department we look forward with a 
great deal of anticipation to the time when we 
may become regular members of Ebell and may 
enter into a fuller, and broader scope of club life. 

TO EBELL CLUB 
Tree Planting Day in California — 
Emma B. Keepers 
Once the brain of a man told the heart of a man 
That beauty is nature's own child. 
So he planted a tree — in the vast mystery 
Of a desert, all barren and wild. 
And the tree grew and grew — 
As he knew it must do — 
And it made the world brighter 
For me and for you. 

Then the man told the children 

To each plant a tree 

On a certain spring day of the year. 

He told it to you and he told it to me. 

And you heard, and I heard, and we hear. 

So — we gather today, with our hearts bright and 

gay 
For we know that all nature rejoices. 
With a hope that is strong 
Let us lift up our song 
Loud and long ; let us lift up our voices. 
Till the desert's vast waste 
Shall see trees interlaced 
And the stillness of nature's repose 
Shall be shaken with wonderful, beautiful life. 
That shall blossom and bloom like the rose. 




The man-tailored suit returns 
to Fashionable importance! 

Bullocks 

BroaiSway— Hill 
an.3— SeventK^ 

Los Angeles 

"One o'clock Saturdays" 



Page 10 



The CLUBWOMAN 



lllllll 



FRIDAY -MORNING CEUB 



ELLA TOWNSEND STORK— A TRIBUTE 

By May W. Benham 



Perhaps in no other decade of American his- 
tory has there been such rapid change in our 
opinions and beliefs as has appeared in the last 
ten years. Words themselves have failed us and 
their former meanings have been lost in the swift 
current of our rushing "stream of consciousness", 
to use the phrase of William James. I have in 
mind one word that so long has been held sacred 
that up till now no one could have conceived its 
splendor dimmed, its glory abated. Patriotism 
has long been esteemed so great a virtue that be- 
side it all other virtues have faded, and those who 
have risked their lives in its display have found 
their vices condoned. Yet today the word finds 
little use. Not so much has it changed in sense 
as in regard and in the altered attitude the new 
American holds to his universe. Most of us has 
enlarged our boundaries. We are "building new 
mansions for our souls". 

Just as of old, the believer in the doctrine of 
States Rights with his narrower patriotism was 
constrained, after the Civil War, to learn a 
larger love of country ivhich is true, first to the 
nation, then to the home and birthplace ; so have 
5rou and I, since the World War, become World- 
citizens, loving our native soil no less, because 
we find ourselves becoming conscious and cap- 
able of a devotion that "finds us foreign to no 
human sympathy". 

It is noteworthy that all the finer abstract vir- 
tues must be interpreted to us in terms of a great 
human personality. Abraham Lincoln first helped 
Americans to take a further step to^vard a proper 
conception of that which, for lack of a better 
word, we still call patriotism. 

When Lincoln said that "government of the 
people, by the people, and for the people must 
not perish from the earth," he spoke in no re- 
stricted sense that included only his fellow coun- 
trymen and excluded the rest of mankind. His 
far-seeing vision took in all future generations 
here and elsewhere. 

When he issued the Emancipation Proclama- 
tion it brought freedom to those who never be- 
fore had dared to claim citizenship in the land 
of their habitation. In the last analysis then, 
without wealth, having never stepped on foreign 
soil, possessing no other grace except that which 
absolute truth, honesty and sincerity may give, 
Abraham Lincoln may be called the greatest 
American. There is no record that he ever 




Ella Toil-send Stork, 
Late a member of Friday Morning CUih 

criticised his fello\v man as an individual. Lin- 
coln's boundless sympathy, his infinite compas- 
sion, his marvelous sense of humor, his wide tol- 
erance of the opinions of others constitute the 
chief elements of his eminence. 

Your former president, Ella Townsend Stork, 
represented to a degree the principles and stand- 
ards of such high citizenship as I have indicated. 
The pure cold abstract virtues took on warmth 
and color through the medium of her remarkable 
personality. To be her friend was not only rich 
experience but liberal education. Without undue 
conceit or self confidence, one felt oneself in- 
spired to be what one might hope to become. 
You have known those with whom, as the phrase 
goes, you seem always at "your worst". More 
than any other friend that I have ever known, 
when I was with her I seemed "at my best". 
Though one might not stay for long at such a 
height, at least, it was the moment at the moun- 



MARCH, 1926 



Page 11 



I 



tain top, and you never again quite touched your 
lower level. Like her beloved Emerson, she 
"hitched her wagon to a star" and invited you to 
ride ■with her! 

She has passed a final milestone toward her 
destination. Those of us who have loved and 
admired this wonderful woman of atmosphere 
and color are happy that we have been permitted 
to travel with her for a little while. Nothing 
could make one long for an immortality that 
recognizes personal identity with its possible fu- 
ture associations than acquaintance with such as 
she. It was my privilege to spend a wonderful 
day with her and some of her most valued inti- 
mates not long before her passing. I shall never 
forget it. To hear her brilliant comments on 
the mysticism of the book read aloud by a friend, 
to see the illuminating flash of her e5'e as she 
herself read from Emerson to us at luncheon, 
to hear her sound and trenchant opinions on na- 
tional affairs, to converse \v\th those whom she 
had brought together that they might know their 
mental kinship, was a signal event of a life time. 
As I left her, never to see her more on this earth, 
though that I could never have guessed, I said 
laughingly to one who loved her well, "I shall 
take this day to Heaven with me!" 

Going first, she has left behind the inspiration 
of her memory, just as once we felt the inspira- 
tion of her presence. She touched us with a di- 
vine spark from that immortal fire which we, too, 
may help to keep alight, and at our passing also 
hand the beacon down to future generations. 




Father be here, that by Thy Grace, 
Body and mind, may grow apace. 
Fed by Thy Love, we'll touch and know, 
Each woman's heart through weal and woe. 



Mrs. Charles S. Burnetl. 
Corresponding Secretary, Friday Morning Club 

Courage and faith, we ask of Thee, 
Adding to these our loyalty? 
And, Oh Lord God, in heart and mind. 
Help us to keep forever kind. 

— Ella Townsend Stork. 



THE SOROPTIMIST CLUB OF LOS ANGELES 

By Alice Mavor Edivards, Secretary 



We were most fortunate in being able to have 
Dr. Mariana Bertola for a luncheon meeting at 
The Biltmore on Februarj^ 9th, together with 
Mrs. Lorbeer and the chairmen of all depart- 
ments in the district, an unusually large group 
of them, we were told. They brought to us a 
sense of our nearness to the great centers of 
women's work, and were kind enough to make 
us feel, though we are new in the federation, that 
business and professional women are an integral 
part of it and are necessan,' to it because of their 
specialized training and their alert interest in po- 
litical and civic activities, as well as those of 
industry. 

The most delightful "get-together" feature of 
our club meetings this year have been the 
monthly birthday celebrations. There are al- 
ways cakes made by Clara Lewis, one of our 
charter members, and one candle atop, because 
no one does any counting at these festal affairs. 



a birthday prize to be drawn for — and the glow- 
ing feeling that one day of the year which has 
always been a personal anniversary means some- 
thing to every other member of the club. Dr. 
Delia H. Hubbard has the birthday affairs in 
her capable charge, Violet Turner Searcy's tal- 
ent at interior decorating has full sway with the 
table decorations and the individualistic place 
cards. For one occasion Anne Hare Harrison in 
g>'psy costume gave an astrologic forecast; at 
another Norma Gould's marvelously costumed 
character dancers in a colorful procession pre- 
sented the cakes. One does not mind the tale 
of the years when statistics are veiled in so much 
kindliness. 

We thought the heaping up of our Service 
Fund was the most real pleasure of any club un- 
dertaking, but since we have established seven 
o fthe loan scholarships, we have discovered that 
(Continued on Page 34) 



Fage 12 



The CLUBWOMAN 




In the New "Home ^y Better Homes" 

If there is one particular "overtone" in the general atmosphere of the new 
home of Barker Bros., at Seventh Street, Flower and Figueroa, that is the 
note of hospitality which is accented repeatedly from the entrance to the top- 
most floor. The main Foyer is the iirst expression of this note. The beautiful 
Italian Renaissance architecture is emphasized by travertine stone walls, bril- 
liantly decorated ceiling, wrought iron doors and organ grills and the many 
small arched balconies opening from the mezzanine and second floors into this 
lofty hall. The furnishings are in character, too — Italian or Spanish in type 
for the most part. Two splendid painted taf>estries by Maynard Dixon 
portray early home life of the southwest. 



MARCH, 1926 



Page 13 



The eastern end of the Gateria. 
or "street of many beauties," 
which extends through the en- 
tire length of Barker Bros.' 
store on the first floor, from 
Flotuer street to Figueroa. The 
smedl display windows and cases 
with wares from the art and 
gift and china and silverware 
departments — the balconies of 
the vieazanine floor with their 
decorated arches and wrought 
iron balustrades, all give ac- 
centing notes of much interest. 



Tfie Mary Louise Tea Room 
an the eleventh floor of Barker 
Bros.' is a pleasant rendezvous 
for shoppers and, being ad- 
jacent to the auditorium, is 
much in demand for luncheons 
and teas. It is most attractive- 
ly decorated, the hangings of 
silver-shot fuchsia silk being 
the color keynote. 






The Ainslie Galleries constl- 
^ ^^, tute a distinct cultural and 

'^V^^^ educational addition to the 
•^■fi * it.i.k city's life. The large main 
room shown here has been oc- 
cupied since opening with a 
number of the superb Moran 
historical canvases. 



The reception room of the Stu- 
dio of Interior Decoration. 
Other display rare and beauti- 
ful antiques — one room having 
been brought intact from an 
old house in England — 



— Showing the beauty 
of the new home 
of Barker Bros. 



Page 14 



The CLUBWOMAN 



WOM AW^ etOB OF^OIiL^WOOD 



By Jessica B. Noble, Press Chairman 



The Woman's Club of Holl5rwood is holding 
its regular meetings each Wednesday at 10:30 
a. m. instead of 2 :30 p. m. as formerly. This 
change in time was made by the Executive Board 
of the club. In May a vote of the club will be 
taken to determine whether or not this change 
will become permanent. Luncheons are served 
at 12:30. 

After the board meeting on the first Tuesday 
of each month a luncheon is served for members 
of the board, department chairmen, and chair- 
men of standing committees. Club affairs are 
discussed at these luncheon meetings, and a good 
understanding among all club activities is brought 
about in this way. 

The Woman's Club of Hollywood is sponsor- 
ing two spring concerts to be given by the Holly- 
wood Community Orchestra, and are also taking 
the lead in raising a fund which will assure ade- 
quate support for this fine organization, of which 
Mr. Jay Plowe is conductor. Miss Jessica M. 
Lawrence, chairman of the orchestra fund com- 



mittee, has announced that $415 in sustaining 
memberships have been purchased. Other mem- 
bers of this committee are Mrs. W. H. Davies, 
Mrs. H. G. Lyman, Mrs. Harry Hanson, Eu- 
nice Landrum Brigham, Mrs. Burdette Norton, 
Miss Caroline Spalding, and Mrs. H. A. Berkes. 
On Sunday afternoon, February 28, the Edu- 
cation Committee, Mrs. Lowell C. Frost, chair- 
man, gave an informal reception in the lounge 
of the club to the University of California in 
Hollj^vood and to the "Friends of the Univer- 
sity." Dean Charles H. Rieber of the Univer- 
sity, Mrs. Charles H. Rieber, president of the 
"Friends of the University", Mr. Squire Coop, 
director of the department of music, and the 
faculty and students of this department were 
honor guests. Miss Jessica Lawrence, hospital- 
ity chairman of the club, and. members of her 
committee, members of the music committee, and 
Miss Elizabeth Colston, president of the Junior 
Auxiliary of the club, were present. Mrs. Ed- 
ward MacDowell, widow of the famous Ameri- 



The Los Angeles 

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and offering the same specialized treat- 
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SEVENTH FLOOR 




MARCH, 1926 



Page 15 



can composer, was a guest of honor. Members 
of Mrs. Frost's committee who were present in- 
cluded Miss Helen Curtis, representing the 
Junior Auxiliary, Miss Bertha Green, Mrs. 
Lynda Hall Sims, and Mrs. Eleanor B. Jones. 
The club desired to show its appreciation of the 
purpose of the "Friends" to broaden the life of 
the university student beyond the required rou- 
tine of university training. This co-operation 
has proved mutually pleasant and helpful. 

The Woman's Club Chorus, Mrs. Maud D. 
Lee Skeen, chairman, will give its second con- 
cert of the year on Thursday evening, March 4. 
This is the annual old-fashioned concert, and 
the members of the chorus will be in costume. 
Mr. Hugo Kirchhofer is the director, and Mrs. 
Inez Jacobson will accompany the chorus on the 
spinet. Members of the Orpheus Club will as- 
sist the chorus in singing and in dancing the 
minuet. A group of negro spirituals will be 
sung, accompanied on the banjo by Mr. Lloyd 
Head. Following the concert, which is given 
in the club auditorium, there will be a grand 
march and dancing in the lounge. 

Mrs. E. Roscoe Shrader, chairman of the Art 
department, ha? brought many fine exhibits to 
the club this year. The following artists have 
been represented by one or more canvasses : 
Donna Schuster, Edouard Vysekal, Luvena 
Vysekal, Carl Oscar Borg, J. Duncan Gleason, 
Francis William Vreeland, Ferdinand Pinney 
Earle, J. H. Gardner Soper, E. Roscoe Shrader, 
John Hubbard Rich, Ernest Albert, Ruth M. 
Bennett, Cornelius Botke, Maurice Braun, Ben- 
jamin Brown, Haldane Douglas, Leslie W. Lee, 
Kathryn Leighton, Jean Mannheim, Irving 
Manoir, Mary Maison, Hanson Puthuff, Ed- 
ward Voelkers, Nell Walker Warner, and Zim- 
merman. 

The Child Welfare department, Dr. Mar\' 
Hess Brown, chairman, has been meeting every 
Thursday afternoon, when the following pro- 
gram is carried out: Physical Examinations — 
1 :30 p. m. For all children of pre-school age. 
Dr. G. S. Moore and Dr. Newell Jones. Mental 
Tests — 1 :30 p. m. For runabouts of the Nursery 
School. Miss Julia Mathews of Child Guidance 
Clinic. Nurserj' School — 3 p. m. Mrs.Rebekah 
Earle, Director. For runabouts (children two 
to' six years). Mothers' Conference — 3 p. m. 
For all mothers and those interested in children. 

Music Day at the W^oman's Club of Holly- 
wood was a notable event. Mrs. J. J. Carter, 
chairman of the music department, introduced 
many famous musicians to the club. The morn- 
ing program was given by Miss Ursula Greville, 
the distinguished English artist, and brilliant 
editor of "The Sackbut", one of the best kno\^Ti 
English music journals. Miss Greville was 
guest of honor and speaker at the luncheon 
following. Other speakers at the luncheon were 



Madame Elly Ney, Marguerite Melville Lis- 
zniewska and Maud Allan. 

On February 17 the club had the unusual 
pleasure of a morning program given by two of 
its most beloved and distinguished members, 
Mrs. J. F. Mead and Mrs. Orville Routt. Mrs. 
Mead is a past president of the club, and is at 
present the chairman of the American Home 
department of the Los Angeles District, Cali- 
fornia Federation of Women's Clubs. Mrs. 
Routt is chairman of the literature department 
of the club and holds the same position in the 
Los Angeles District. Mrs. Mead spoke on "My 
Perennial Book" which proved to be an old 
fashioned cook book ! In her whimiscal and 
witty manner she reviewed this book in approved 
book reviewer style. Mrs. Routt gave a 
thoughtful and penetrating study of "Katherine 
Mansfield." Mrs. Routt's literature luncheons 
have proved so popular that they have been 
limited to members only. 

Mrs. Arthur Bruce, chairman of the Spanish 
department, has reorganized this department and 
is holding Spanish reading and conversation 
group meetings on Wednesday mornings at 9 :30. 
The 45-minute class is under the leadership of 
one of the members and there is no fee charged. 

The music section meets every two weeks on 
the Tuesday morning preceding the concert given 
on Friday and Saturday by the Philharmonic 
Orchastra. Sarah Ellen Barnes gives a talk at 
each of these meeting on the orchestra program 
which is given that week. The public is cordially 
invited to attend these meetings. 

The last Presidents' Council of this club year 
will be held at the Woman's Club of Hollywood 
on Tuesday, March 16. Public Welfare is the 
subject for the day. Luncheon will be served to 
two hundred and fifty at the club and an ad- 
ditional two hundred will be taken care of at 
the Hollyivood Congregational Church across the 
street. The club auditorium seats one thousand 
and it is hoped there will be a capacity attendance. 

There will be five regular meetings of the 
club in March. On March 3, at 10:30 a. m.. 
Dr. Herbert L. Willett will speak on "The 
Spirit of Youth." Dr. Willett is professor of 
Oriental Languages and Literature in the Uni- 
versity of Chicago. 

A concert will be given on March 10 by 
Margaret Messer Morris, soprano, and Eunice 
Landrum Brigham, pianist. Margaret Messer 
Morris, "Hollywood's own soprano" has appeared 
each year with great success as soloist with the 
symphony orchestra in Hollywood Bowl. For 
several years she has been the chosen exponent 
of the works of many famous composers, and her 
concerts with Charles Wakefield Cadman have 
endeared her to music lovers in every Southland 
community. Eunice Landrum Brigham is a 
former chairman of the music department of 



Page 16 



The CLUBWOMAN 



the club. 

An illustrated lecture will be given on March 
17 by Annette Helen Doherty, America's leading 
woman lecturer on East Indian Life. Her 
subject is "The Lure of India." Mrs. Doherty 
spent six years in India, where, by her keenness 
of intellect, breath of scholarship, appreciation, 
and striking social adaptability, she was able to 
study Indian life with a thoroughness such as 
few persons in America have ever done. 

On March 24 Mr. James G. McDonald will 
lecture on the subject "Some Problems of World 
Organization." Mr. McDonald has been chair- 
man of the Executive Board of the Foreign Policy 
Association since 1919. He has met most of the 
outstanding political personalities in Europe in 
recent years. He has played a prominent part 
in the World Court Co-ordinating Committee, 
comprising some twenty large national organiza- 
tions. 

The Stoloff String Quartet will give an all- 
Russian program on March 31. This quartet is 
composed of Claire Mellonino, pianist, Morris 
Stoloff, first violin, Anthony Briglio, viola, and 
Nicholas Ochi-Albi, 'cello. 

There will be two literature luncheons in 
March, on the third and on the twenty-fourth. 
Mrs. H. A. Davidson will give Book Reviews 
and Literary Criticism on March 3. Mrs. 
Orville Routt, chairman, has charge of both 
programs and will preside. 

Following out the plan of the Public Affairs 
Department which is in the hands of the board 
of directors this year, Mrs. Sidney T. Exley, a 
member of the board, will be chairman at the 
Public Affairs Luncheon on March 10. The 
subject is "Our City." Mrs. Exley is a former 
president of the Los Angeles District, California 
Federation of Women's Clubs. 

The annual Press Luncheon will be held on 
March 17, with Jessica B. Noble, chairman, 
presiding. Alma Whitaker of the Los Angeles 
Times will be one of the speakers. 
■ Miss Elizabeth Colston, president of the Junior 
Auxiliary of the club, will have charge of the 
luncheon on March 31. 



Witzel Photographer 

Official for 

THE CLUBWOMAN 

3 Studios in Los Angeles — for your 
convenience 

6324 HOLLYWOOD BLVD. 
PHONE HOLLY 0343 

536 SOUTH BROADWAY 

ENTIRE SIXTH FLOOR 

PHONES: TUcker 2448— VAndik* 0414 

1011 WEST SEVENTH STREET 

PHONE 535-91 




If 



YOU 

have not already passed 
through the great arched por- 
tal that is the first gesture of 
welcome to the new home 
of Barker Bros., you are here- 
by invited to do so at your 
earliest opportunity. 

And you are especially invited 
to become acquainted with, 
and to avail yourself of, the 
many new services which we 
are enabled to offer in this 
new building. 



BARKER BROS. 

Complete Furnishers of Successful Homes 
SEVENTH STREET, Flower &FtgueToa 



i 



\ 



MARCH. 1926 



Page 17 



THE PASADENA SHAKESPEARE CLUB IDEA 



By Ann L. R. Coleman 



It is not to be denied that the Pasadena Shake- 
speare Club idea was born of an opportunity 
presented to the members of that club. They 
saw one of their number giving up her ^vriting 
because of the lack of that leisure necessary to 
any artistic achievement. They knew her history 
and the books she had to her credit. They re- 
belled against the conditions of the economic 
world which does not value the artistic product 
as highly as it values grosser products. When 
they said, let us be the soil in which this parti- 
cular fruitful tree shall be transplanted to the 
enrichment of the world, then was the idea 
brought into being. 

With a discerning eye these women looked 
upon the idea and pronounced it good. It is a 
natural development in the growth of the 
women's clubs, they said. They could remember 
the early days ■when the women's clubs stood for 
cultural study alone. They had seen its expan- 
sion into its present day all-embracing social 
service. Remembering and seeing, they now 
predicted a further development. They said 
the women's club must become the conservator 
and the protector of the creative art it found 
within itself. This was the idea. It will be 
seen that the idea goes a step farther than the 



club scholarship plan which is to help the per- 
sumably worth while among their youth to attain 
the means to achieve. It goes a step farther be- 
cause it has as its object the conservation, in 
youth or age, of that which has already arrived 
at its goal as judged by a jury of its peers. The 
idea is akin to the Peterborough Idea in that it 
recognizes the need of seclusion for the produc- 
tion of creative effort. It is however unique in 
the history of women's clubs so far, in that it 
seeks to combine the scholarship idea with the 
MacDowell idea to the end of establishing a 
means for creative effort in quite surroundings 
together with a freedom from economic pressure. 
About twenty members of the Pasadena 
Shakespeare club who saw this vision, have found 
themselves formed into a sort of club which they 
call the "I.e." These letters may stand, they 
say, for "Inner Circle," or may be spelled "I 
See," with the translation of "see" to mean a 
sympathetic comprehension or understanding. 
One of these members has a cottage at a beach 
famed for its colony of artists and writers. This 
cottage, snug and comfortably accoutered, has 
been placed at the disposal of the "I See's" for 
five months. The other members are pledging 
themselves to a monthly sum which shall care 











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Page 18 



The CLUBWOMAN 



for all current expenses and render unnecessary 
any financial arrangement on the part of the 
incumbent. They are now naming as the first 
incumbent of the idea, one of hte Shakespeare 
club members to be their producing guest for five 
months. Very humbly they are offering them- 
selves as the soil out of which something lovely 
may grow. They are living in all good hope 
that some artistic production may be traced there- 
after to the effects of their beloved club, and 
with something like suppressed excitement they 
will watch this fascinating experiment during the 
period of its unfolding. 

The first member of the Shakespeare Club 

LOS ANGELES SECTION 

JEWISH 

COUNCIL HOUSE— A 

By Mrs. Herbert S. Denitz 
"Council House — Dedicated to a Better tVorld, 

Higher Learninffj Broader Wisdom, and a Deeper 
Understanding of Humanity." 

Conceived for the betterment of mankind, 
consecrated to years of steadfast service, and 
symbolic of the lofty ideals of the Jewish people. 
Council House rapidly rears its stately walls 
towards the fufillment of a dream of j'csterday. 
Standing at the threshold of a glorious new 
era of service made possible by the near culmina- 
tion of its plans, the Los Angeles Section of the 
National Council of Jewish Women, after a 
scant two years of effort, is ready to present its 
beautiful structure to the countless men and 
women of the community whose support proved 
invaluable during the past months. 

The thought of Council House is insolubly 
linked with the name of that indomitable leader, 
Lillian Burkhart Goldsmith, president of the 
organization, whose strenuous efforts combined 
with those of the building committee and the 
directors of the council, are in the main respon- 
sible for the remarkable accomplishments of last 
year. The roster of the building committee con- 
tains names prominent in the community, among 
them being Mrs. Aleck Brownstein, Mrs. Henry 
G. Mosler, Mrs. Thomas May, Mrs. James 
Hellman, Mrs. Irving Hellman, Mrs. Adolph 
Sieroty, Mrs. Sol Goodman, Mrs. Henry Klein, 
Mrs. L. G. Reynolds, Mrs. Joseph Ferguson, 
and Mrs. F. B. Meister, while Mrs. E. L. 
Doheny, Mr. and Mrs. Isadore Eisner, Mr. and 
Mrs. Ben Meyer, Mr. and Mrs. Milton Getz, 
Mr. and Mrs. David May, Mr. and Mrs. D. A. 
Hamburger, Mrs. Moses Hamburger, Mr. and 



upon whom has fallen the honor of representing 
them in the literary field and who has accepted 
with gallantry the onus of bringing this first 
endeavor to a happy conclusion, is Miss Mary 
Catherine Judd of Pasadena, one time beloved 
teacher in the schools of Minnesota and Wiscon- 
sin after her graduation from Albion College 
Michigan, and now the author of many books 
for children. Miss Judd has published five 
volumes, the "A. B. C. Book of Birds for Chil- 
dren, Large or Small," "Classic Myths Retold," 
"The Palmer Cox Brownie Primer," "Wigwam 
Stories," and "Legends of Rhineland." 

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF 
WOMEN 

DREAM FULFILLED 

Mrs. R. Raphael, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Cole, 
and Mr. Marco Hellman are but a few of those 
who have contributed substantially towards the 
success of Council House. 

The building graces a sightly hill in a beauti- 
ful section of the city, at 214 Loma Drive, on a 
lot 87 feet by 160 feet, the structure being of 
Spanish colonial architecture, with its vari- 
colored walls in rich embellishments of poly- 
chrome and terra cotta, the roof of red tiles, a 
patio, and gracefully wrought metal balconies 
adding to its picturesque charm. 

A recent interview with Mr. Frederick H. 
Wallis, architect of the firm of Norton and 
Wallis under whose direction the building is 
being erected, disclosed the opinion that Council 
House will be one of the most beautiful club 
dwellings in the southwest. 

Entering the arched entrance-way, above 
which the Star of David sheds its rays, one 
finds the lobby, its floor of colorful tiles, from 
which leads a stairway of stone, enhanced by a 
wrought iron railing. To the left of the lobby 
will be the foyer-room that gives access through 
a massive grill gate, to the beautiful lounge and 
tea room. There, with small tables grouped 
intimately about the huge fireplace, many smart 
functions will take place during the coming 
seasons. Adding to the dignity of the room will 
Je the ceiling of great beams, while archei 
windows at the front will reveal the terraced 
patio garden, exquisite with palms, shrubs and 
flowers. 

The outstanding feature is, of course, the huge 
assembly ballroom which, with its balcony, will 
accommodate 900 people. A semi-elliptical arched 



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San Diego 



MARCH, 1926 



Page 19 



beamed ceiling, combined with mural paintings 
will reflect an air of great artistry. 

Of primary importance in Council House will 
be the unlimited opportunities for furthering the 
philanthropic work of the organization. The 
second and third floors of the building, devoted 
solely to social service will be a true workshop 
of the Council. Containing executive offices, 
waiting rooms, sitting rooms, suites for the 
Children's Bureau and Immigrant Aid Sections, 
experimental kitchens, study rooms, and a small 
assembly room equipped for amateur dramatics, 
ever\- need has been fully met. Modern social 
service universally acknowledges the primary 
importance of recreational work as a means of 
character and health building. Perha,ps the 
greatest problem confronting the Children's 
Bureau and Immigrant Aid sections is the lack 
of harmony and understanding between the im- 
migrant Jewish mother, and her already more 
modern and so-called "Americanized" child, with 
its desire for picture and freedom. With Coun- 
cil House as a common meeting place for parent 
and child, Americanization in its truest sense 
can be readily accomplished. The experimental 
kitchen where the mothers will be instructed in 
the why and wherefore of proper cooking and 
nutrition is but one phase of the wide scope 
presented in this field, while a comprehensive 
library is to be installed for study purposes in 
another portion of the building. 

With the many rooms in the Council House 
that must be equipped for their special require- 
ments, an opportunity- is presented for those who 
desire to further assist in this splendid work to 



aid in furnishing these various suites. Several 
members have already promised to furnish rooms 
in memory of loved ones who have passed on, 
while the Junior Section of the Council will pay 
for the fireplace in the main lounge. 

A veritable milestone in the progress of the 
building marked the afternoon of Sunday, Febru- 
ary 28, when cornerstone laying exercises were 
held, the formal ceremony preceded by a lunch- 
eon at the Biltmore Hotel. Chairman of the 
luncheon were Mesdames Sol Goodman, J. A. 
Stodel, and Eli Elias, while former hostesses of 
the day included past presidents of the Council, 
among them Mesdames Florine Wolfstein, Ed- 
mond Lazard, Henry Klein, Jules Kauffman, 
and Henry Strauss. Men and women, prominent 
in this and other communities attended, including 
Mr. and Mrs. Isaac W. Frank of Pittsburgh, 
Mr. and Mrs. Benj. Wolff of Philadelphia, Mr. 
and Mrs. Louis Freeman, Mr. and Mrs. Moses 
Born, Mr. Louis Kuppenheimer, all of Chicago, 
and Mr. Isadore Eisner, Mr. Henry Louis, Miss 
Mary Workman, Mr. Jacob Steinberg, Mr. 
Ceasar Samuels, Mr. George Mosbacher, Mr. 
Irving Lipsitch, Rabbi Edgar F. Magnin, 
Rabbi Ernest Trattner, Rabbi Maurice Technor 
and Rabbi Mayer Winkler. 



SANTA MONICA BAY 
WOMAN'S CLUB 

Florence Govian, Press Chairman 

From the days of "Aunt Dinah's Quilting 
Party," down to our present rushing age and on, 
let us hope, so long as the world holds people, 



=— — — TRUSTWORTHY FIRMS -■ 

It is with pleasure that THE CLUBWOMAN recommends to the patronage of mem- 
bers of women's clubs the Nurseries and Florists whose announcements appear on this page. 



NEW BULB CATALOGUE 

for 1924-25 now ready for distribution. It 
is free and a post card or telephone call 
will bring it immediately. 

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Telephone Main 3530 

LOS ANGELES CALIFORNIA 


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Main Store, 2 11 S. Main St. 

Phone VAndike 9532 

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224 West Fourth St. Los Angeles, Cal. 



Page 20 



The CLUBWOMAN 



women have loved to get together to sew and 
talk. Somehow the sewing lends a little personal 
air to the talking and the talk makes the sewing 
not work but play. Taking advantage of this 
feminine tendency, the Santa Monica Bay 
Woman's Club is getting its members together 
twice each month to talk for their own good and 
sew for the good of the club. Departments of 
Literature and Drama alternately on the second 
and fourth Wednesdays, hold open house at the 
club. Members come at eleven o'clock and find 
ready for them attractive articles to be made 
and sold at the club's Spring Festival or Summer 
Carnival. At noon a luncheon is served by 
committees appointed from the group and in the 
afternoon as the sewing progresses, there are 
reviews of current books and plays. As an ad- 
ditional feature the chairman of Literature, Mrs. 
A. C. Barke, now announces that she has ar- 
ranged to have Mr. W. L. Mason, a recognized 
authority on questions of English dictation, con- 
duct a half hour discussion of the correct use 
of our mother tongue. Very popular are these 
gatherings, "the nicest thing in the club" ex- 
claimed one enthusiastic advocate. 

One of the most satisfactory phases of the 
club's activities as the year progresses is the fine 
work done by the departments, fifteen of them, 
headed by wide-awake, energetic chairmen, who 
push the press chairman hard to keep informed 
and to let the public know of the many excellent 
programs being offered. Members of the depart- 
ment of Music enjoyed particularly during the 
past month a program of Schumann music given 
by Millicent Virden Jackson, chairman, a pianist 
of the highest order, assisted by Madame Amet. 
Travel section followed "Along the Tourist 
Trail in Bible Lands" led by Mr. Adelbert Bart- 
lett and felt that they had really been there, so 
perfectly did the beautiful photographs represent 
the countries visited. The Drama department 
on February 11, presented for the benefit of the 
club, three one-act plays, "Rosberry Shrub," by 
Frank Drake, "What They Think," by Rachel 
Crothers, and "Such a Charming Young Man" 
by Zoe Akins, under the direction of Mrs. W. H. 
Cornett. This department, which is one of the 
most practically helpful of any in the club, due 
in large measure to the chairman, Mrs. J. F. 
Jarvis, presented a play of colonial days, "The 
Birthday Ball" as a part of the colonial party in 
celebration of Washington's Birthday. Elaborate 
preparations were made for this affair and for 
the day short skirts and bobbed heads were for- 
gotten as ruffles, hoops and powdered w^gs held 
sway. At luncheon, toasts to Washington as 
citizen, soldier, statesman, proved that to club 
women at least, the Father of his Country is still 
"first in the hearts of his countrymen" despite 
the efforts of certain modern investigators to 
detract from his fame. 



March 1 is being anticipated as a great day. 
Designated "President's Day," the club will 
entertain Dr. Mariana Berthola and all the past 
presidents of the Santa Monica Club, among 
them Mrs. J. C. Urquhart, Mrs. James Birney 
Lorbeer, and others distinguished for their serv- 
ices to clubs. In addition presidents of many 
neighboring clubs have been invited for this day 
which Mrs. Neil Duckies, president of Santa 
Monica Bay Club, has arranged. 



HIGHLAND PARK EBELL 
CLUB 

Mrs. George F. Cook, Press Chairman 
Morning addresses of unusual interest recently 
at Highland Park Ebell Club were, "The Gal- 
lery of the Heavens" by Miss Winifred Rouzee, 
"How Types of Fiction Change" by Dr. Fred- 
erick T. Blanchard, professor of English, Univer- 
sity of California, Southern Branch ; "Legisla- 
tion" by Miss Eleanor Miller, member of State 
Legislature, sixty-seventh district ; "Law Observ- 
ance or Law Enforcement" by William T. 
Aggeler, public defender of Los Angeles county. 
Of special interest was a federation program 
consisting of an address by the State President, 
Dr. Mariana Bertola, on "Interesting Phases of 
Federation Work;" also addresses by Mrs. James 
Birney Lorbeer, president of the Los Angeles 
District C. F. W. C, and by Mrs. J. C. Urqu- 
hart, past state president, C. F. W. C. Club 
editors from various Los Angeles papers were 
guests. Fifty members including the president 
and executive boards from Wednesday Morning 
Club, North Highland Park Woman's Club, 
Twentieth Century Club of Eagle Rock and the 
Woman's Club of South Pasadena were invited 
to join with Highland Park Ebell Club in greet- 
ing the State President. Miss Mary Bothwell, 
soprano, was the singer for the morning. Mrs. 
Robert Booth, contralto, with Ruth Towne 
Smith at the piano, sang a group of Scotch songs 
at one session and Mrs. George Edward Jones, 
pianist, favored the club with well rendered 
selections at another session. 

Among the sections, an informal discussion of 



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MARCH, 1926 



Page 21 



books took place at the literature section, many 
of the club members taking part. "The City, 
Our Nearest Political Neighbor" was discussed 
at the American Citizenship section. 

At the Bible section. Miss Winifred Rouzee 
discussed I Kings and II Kings. "The Swan" 
by Franz Molnar, was read before the Drama 
section by Mrs. R. W. Snell, curator of the 
section. Mrs. Harry E. Fisher gave a splendid 
talk before the Music section on "The Symp- 



hony." Mrs. Charles S. McKelvey, leader of the 
Parliamentary Law section, led in a discussion 
on "Reports of Committees." At the Shakespeare 
section, Cariolanus was completed. The mem- 
bers of the Rambler section were guests of Mrs. 
E. P. McCaulley of Hollywood on February 24. 
An Art exhibit, including twelve paintings by 
members of the West Coast Art Club, was a 
February attraction at the club house, arranged 
by Mrs. W. L. Judson, Art chairman. 



LONG BEACH EBELL 

Ba Mrs. Frederick Gump, Jr., Press Chairman 



Dr. Mariana Bertola, of San Francisco, presi- 
dent of the California Federation of Women's 
Clubs was the honored guest Wednesday, Febru- 
ary 17 at the President's Council of the Los 
Angeles District in session at the Ebell Club- 
house at Long Beach. 

A maternity ward and a children's ward in 
every county and every city hospital in California 
is the purpose for which Dr. Bertola is giving 
two years as head of the Federation. "It costs 
money to have a baby to-day," said the distin- 
guished club leader. "The people who should 
have the children, who have the background of 
heredity, education and health do not have the 
$400 which is the minimum cost. Los Angeles 
county is planning a new hospital. Make it 
your business to know what provision is made 
for mothers and children." A plea for considera- 
tion of the bright child was also made by Dr. 
Bertola, who pointed out that careful studies and 
many provisions are made for morons, deficients, 
etc., but the bright child was taken as a matter 
of course. She made a protest against the con- 
tinual showing off and the forcing of the child, 
to which she attributed the first steps in the 
production of nervous wrecks. 

Eight hundred clubwomen, including ninety- 
six presidents had registered before noon. Mrs. 
J. B. Lorbeer, district president, was the pre- 
siding officer of the day. 



An impressive event of the morning was the 
memorial to Mrs. Charles Toll, junior past 
president of the district. An announcement of 
interest was a message from Glendale to the 
effect that it had been decided to name one of 
the handsome new school buildings the Eleanor 
Joy Toll Building in recognition of the character 
and constructive work done by Mrs. Toll in 
that city. 

A time-honored convention custom is to be 
cast aside by Los Angeles District, California 
Federation of Women's Clubs, at its next annual 
assembly. Presidents will no longer consume 
hours of time in the reading of one-minute re- 
ports. 

The sacrifice of personal prominence is made 
by vote of the club presidents themselves who, 
99 to 100, voted for the substitution of addresses 
by distinguished speakers and round tables on 
vital topics. 

The delicious luncheon which was served in 
the spacious new dining room, was followed by 
short addresses by such newspaper women as, 
Ruth McClintock, club editor, Los Angeles 
Express, who told of her visit to General Federa- 
tion headquarters in Washington, D. C. Caro- 
line Walker, club editor of the Los Angeles 
Herald, who defined news from an editorial 
standpoint; Grace Frye, club editor, Saturday 



JANUARY SALES throughout the entire 
month — reductions in every department. 




SEVENTH STREET AT OLIVE 



Page 22 



Thi CLUBWOMAN 



Night, who laid the blame of scareheads and 
murder details on the public. 

Mrs. Orla Spray, district chairman of Press, 
had charge of the early afternoon program. 
Interesting talks were made by Myra Nye, club 
editor of the Los Angeles Times, Mrs. Anita 
Day Hubbard, State Press chairman, and 
Blanche Friend Austin of Redondo, a member 
of the Press department of the General Federa- 
tion. 

Mrs. Harry Michael, radio chairman, gave a 
resume of the activities of that department, which 
consisted of weekly afternoon programs and 
monthly night programs over KNX. 

Mrs. Lorbeer, District President, made an 
announcement which was to the effect that the 
next convention will take place in Pasadena, 
April 6 to 8, sessions at Pasadena Shakespeare 
clubhouse headquarters at Hotel Huntington. 



BLOSSOM TIME EXCURSION 

By Edna Metzger 

In the picturesque port city of Hilo, Island of 
Hawaii, a native daughter of California, Mrs. E. 
N. Holmes, president of the Hilo Woman's 
Club, is counting the days until May 22 when 
she will have the joy of visiting with some 150 
mainland men and women, according to Mrs. 
Charles A. Wiley, president of the Long Beach 
Ebell Club which is celebrating its thirtieth 
birthday by taking a Blossom-Time Excursion 
party to Hawaii in May. 

"We learned of your coming visit to the 
islands just in time to discuss it at our annual 
meeting," Mrs. Holmes writes Mrs. Wiley, "and 
I assure you that you are going to receive an 
enthusiastic welcome from Hilo. We voted to 
invite your party to a luncheon and informal 
reception at the Yacht Club on your return from 
a visit at the volcano, when you will have four 
or five hours free before your steamer leaves 
for Honolulu. 

"Our women are hungry for news of what 
California women are doing and our men are 
just as eager for first hand news of the 'states.' " 

The excursion leaves San Francisco May 12, 
a special train from Long Beach to take the party 
to that port May 11, and excursionists may 
return on steamers sailing from Honolulu 
May 26, June 2, June 9, or even later as they 
elect. 

Long Beach Ebell is inviting all California 
woman's clubs to join the club in its birthday 
excursion as well as interested men and women 
generally. Bookings at 205 Pacific Southwest 
Building are already brisk, says Mrs. Wiley. 



ing \vith a business meeting on February 3, at 
which time a full report for the preceding month 
was given by the board of directors ; also the 
directors of each section and standing committee. 

The afternoon programs have been exception- 
ally fine and several noted speakers were heard. 
The music section arranged a, food sale on 
February 10. A tempting array of home-made 
pies, cakes, jellies and candies were on display in 
the reception room, but not for long. In fact, 
the sale was so successful that it was continued 
the following Wednesday. On Thursday, 
February 11, a Valentine card party was spon- 
sored by the Drama section, under the manage- 
ment of Mrs. Louise Schumann. Bridge and 
five hundred were played, after which tea was 
served. 

The Shakespeare section has completed the 
study of Othello and is now at work on the 
three parts of King Henry. The Drama section 
had the pleasure of hearing Eleanor M. Dvorak, 
instructor, read "Sun Up" by Lulu Volmer. The 
Current Event section with Berenice Johnson, 
instructor; English section, with Mrs. Jack 
Vallely, instructor, and Parliamentary Usage 
section, with Mrs. Charles S. McKelvey, instruc- 
tor, are all functioning and are largely attended 
and greatly enjoyed by members. 

The Ramblers, with Mrs. Cal Ryus, director, 
are taking hikes into the hills and canyons every 
second and fourth Thursday. 

The crowning event of the month was the 
operetta "Cherry Blossoms," given by the Music 
section on February 27. The scenes of the play 
were laid in old Japan and cherry blossoms, 
lanterns, and the gay kimonos of the caste made 
a charming picture. Our o\iti president, Mrs. 
Harold William Bailey, and Vice-President 
Mrs. Paul Zahn, sang the two leading roles. 
This was under the direction of Professor Ralph 
R. Laughlin, assisted by Mrs. Marion Dunn, 
with Mrs. John Hokem as accompanist. 



WEDNESDAY MORNING CLUB 

Pauline E. Olson, Press Chairman 
February was a most active and interesting 
month at the Wednesday Morning Club, start- 



THE COLLEGE WOMEN'S 
CLUB OF LONG BEACH 

By Grace E. Irioin, Press Chairman 
The College Women's Club has presented 
some very excellent programs during the current 
year. 

On January 6 Sherwood Anderson gave his 
lecture on "American, a Storehouse of Vitality''' 
at the regular meeting of the club. That Mr. 
Anderson is greatly admired by those who read 
the worth-Avhile modern books was attested to 
by the very large and appreciative audience 
which assembled as the press committee had ad- 
vertised extensively in the local papers that the 
club members extended to the public the oppor- 
tunity of hearing this lecture, many members 
made use of their guest privileges for this meet- 
ing, nevertheless a gratifying amount was real- 



ized from the door receipts. 

Mr. Anderson did not disappoint his audi- 
ence but brought to it his own original ideas 
and prophecies, clothed in unique language and 
interspersed with whimsical humor. He left in 
Long Beach many personal admirers who had 
previously only appreciated his ^vritten words. 

Socially, the club is fortunate in being able 
to secure the use of the Junior Business Women's 
Club parlors at the new Y. W. C. A. building 
for a small rental, every Wednesday afternoon 
from 3 to 5 o'clock and is holding Weekly 
Scholarship Silver Teas. Hostesses have been 
appointed for each week and these, viith the 
fifteen members chosen at large from the club 
membership, are striving to knit closer together 
the bonds of friendship between the members. 
It is called a Silver Tea as those who enjoy the 
chat over the tea cups are expected to leave a 
silver mite for the Scholarship Fund of the club. 
Many are glad to have these teas re-established 
as the same plan worked very successfully when 
tried two jears ago. 

Five new members ■svere ^oted into the club 
during January — indicating that the club is in- 
deed a growing organization well worth while 
in this community. 



BEVERLY HILLS WOMAN'S 
CLUB 

By Jessie Virginia Duggan, Press Chairman 

Since the Beverly Hills Woman's Club 
opened their attractive and well planned home 
at Chevy Chase and Benedict Canyon Drives 
in the foothills of Beverly Hills, the club house 
has been the scene of a series of interesting 
events which have provided a variety of enter- 
tainment for the members of the club. 

Following the dedicatory meeting in October 
when Mrs. Jay B. Millard, beloved past presi- 
dent of the club, conducted the opening meet- 
mg, Mrs. Nbrman A. Pabst, newly elected pres- 
ident of the organization, accepted the responsi- 
bilities of the club and started planning a splen- 
did program for the year. 

One of the most important aiJairs of the au- 
tumn schedule was the second annual Beverly 
Hills Horse Show given by the Beverly Hills 
Horse Show Association, the proceeds of which 
were to be devoted to the club. Mrs. Elizabeth 
Lloyd Smith, chairman of the benefit commit- 
tee, assisted by her committee, worked earnestly 
to make the show an event of interest and color 
\vith the result that the show was a definite so- 
cial and equestrian success besides netting over 
$3000 for the building fund. The benefit com- 
mittee also arranged a number of afternoon, and 
evening bridge parties for the club members and 
their friends. 

Feeling that as a group it wished to help ma- 
terially in the building of the club, the Drama 
Section spent considerable time and effort in the 
production of three one-act plays which were 
presented at the clubhouse on the evening of 




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Page 24 



The CLUBWOMAN 



January 20 and 21. All of the feminine mem- 
bers of the cast belonged to the club and one of 
the clever sketches, "The Delicate Child," was 
\\'Titten by Maurine Gee, a member of the 
Drama Section, assisted by Helen Mclntyre. 

The Current Events section of the club was 
successful in securing Arline Barrett Greenwood 
again this year to deliver her course of stimu- 
lating lectures before the group, the lectures be- 
ing given the third Tuesday of every month. 

The Monday Afternoon section of the club 
has been enjoying a series of book reviews given 
by members of the group at the bi-monthly gath- 
erings at the clubhouse. A delightful tea hour 
follows the informal talks of the afternoon. 

The Tuesday Afternoon group has had the 
pleasure of hearing Mrs. Jack Vallely in sev- 
eral of her reviews on current literature this 
year. The section has also held a few pleasant 
social afternoon for new members of the group. 

Mrs. Charles Smith, as chairman of the Music 
section has been able to secure many interesting 
artists for the gatherings of members who take 
keen enjoyment in vocal and instrumental music. 
It is the plan of the Music section to soon pre- 
sent a program which will present musical mem- 
bers of the club. 

The Junior Auxiliary of the mother organ- 
ization not only holds regular bi-monthly meet- 
ings but also plans informal teas for the Junior 
Auxiliaries of Los Angeles clubs. The younger 
girls also assisted in detail work at the Horse 
Show. 

An innovation in the club program this year 
has been the holding of occasional assemblies at 
the clubhouse where a evening of dancing and a 
bufifet supper brings together an interesting gath- 
ering of people. Such affairs are being fostered 
by the board of directors in order that many of 
the newer members of the organization may 
know the charter members of the body and ac- 
cordingly feel a keen interest in the upbuilding 
and development of the club which has made 
such rapid progress during the years of its exist- 
ence. 



THE WOMEN'S TWENTIETH 

CENTURY CLUB OF 

EAGLE ROCK 

By Mrs. Warden Woolard 
The program committee of The Women's 
Twentieth Century Club, under the chairman- 
ship of Mrs. H. I. Cruzon, has striven to have 
the work of each department of the club touched 
upon in a program during the year. The Amer- 
ican Home, Child Welfare, Birds of California, 
Education, Better Books, Music, International 
Understanding and International Relations, have 
already been represented. 

On January 28, the Drama and Literature 



section had charge of the day's program, 
and under the direction of Elgie Lowry Fischer, 
presented "Manners and Modes" with the 
cast chosen from members of the section. In 
connection with History and Landmarks, Mr. 
Gordon Whitnall, of the Cit)' Planning Com- 
mission, spoke on "The Development of Our 
Parks" and "City Planning." An unusual 
program was given February 25, by the Study 
section, Mrs. Mary Fisk, chairman. The 
day was devoted to China and Japan, and 
Mr. R. Hal Lee and Miss Frances Webster 
Adams gave intimate glimpses of the coun- 
tries. The luncheon and music were ap- 
propriate to the day's program, and all members 
who were able to do so wore oriental dress. 
The day on which practically all of the club 
members vnW be present is March 11, for Mrs. 
James Birney Lorbeer of the Los Angeles Dis- 
trict G. F. W. C. is to be guest and luncheon 
speaker, and the program is to be a Carrie Ja- 
cobs Bond one. Mrs. Bond has promised to be 
the guest of honor if she is in the city. The 
Bible section with Mrs. Abigail Sheriff, chair- 
man, is to have the program on March 25. 

Mrs. Mary Marsh Buff of the Art department 
has announced a pilgrimage to the Pan-American 
exhibition Friday, Januan,' 29, leaving Eagle 
Rock at 1 p. m. 

The departments of American Citizenship, 
Mrs. A. G. Reily, chairman ; Civic Betterment, 
Mrs. Dirks, chairman, and Legislation, Mrs. 
Clausen, chairman, are uniting in a Public Af- 
fairs dinner, Januar}"^ 30. 

The American Home department, although 
new, is getting under way with a flourish and 
has planned an interesting year. On January 
20, it gave a luncheon at which Mrs. Masson 
gave a Health Lecture, and the original Pru- 
dence Penny talked on "The Home." Next 
month, it is to have an exhibition of Arts and 
Crafts made in Eagle Rock, and a discussion 
on the origin and art of manufacturing china- 
ware. In April, Mr. McNabb is to lecture on 
gardening to the members of the section. 



KATE TUPPER GALPIN 
SHAKESPEARE CLUB 

By Elizabeth L. Fisher, Press Chairman 

At the Women's University Club, on Wednes- 
day, February 10, at 10:30 a. m., the Galpin 
Shakespeare Club held its regular monthly meet- 
ing. The program for the morning was furn- 
ished by Mrs. H. T. Pole, who gave an ad- 
dress comparing the young people of Shakes- 
peare's plays and youth as portrayed in modern 
drama. She considers that at heart the young 
are much alike in all ages of the world except 
as molded by environment. 

Mrs. Pole read an extract from a modem I 



MARCH, 1926 



Page 25 



play, "Processional" and said that the idea \vas 
the same as in the well-known scene in which 
Hamlet reproaches Gertrude, his mother, in 
spite of the diiterence of the characters in the 
social scale. Hamlet and Gertrude being of 
course a prince and a queen while the "Proces- 
sional" people are poor and ignorant. 

Mrs. Pole gave considerable attention to eco- 
nomic questions as affecting the heart affairs of 
young people in our time. Shakespeare could not 
have considered the love of Rosalind and Or- 
lando for instance as such as simple matter if 
there had been so many complications about sup- 
port, style of living, etc., as at the present day. 

Our bard's people evidently did not dwell 
much on such considerations as rents and the like. 

In regard to the 5'oung woman who is really 
bad, not just careless and over-independent, Mrs. 
Pole referred any club member who might think 
such a girl was something new in literature to 
Shakespeare's "Troilus and Cressida." 

Another reading from "Processional" and one 
from that painful modern play, "The Adding 
Machine," were incorporated in this thoughtful 
address. 

SOUTH SIDE EBELL CLUB 

By Edna Grace Cooke, Sub-Press Chairman 
The South Side Ebell Club feels that it has 
been peculiarly blessed this month, in that it 



was among those fortunate enough to be paid 
a personal visit by our State President, Dr. Ma- 
riana Bertola. That visit made of the day one 
long to be remembered in the annals of the 
club, as the courage and inspiration with which 
she inbued her listeners is the very stimulus so 
much needed in federated clubdom today. 

Dr. Bertola opened her session with a 20 
minute round table talk, which she called 
"Faults We Find With Our Club," and the 
discussions invoked at this session did much to 
clear the musty atmosphere of fault finding and 
to throw light where light was most needed. 
Following this informal talk came the forceful 
and inspiring talk "The Light of My Candle," 
by Dr. Bertola, in which she planly showed to 
every one wherein their duties lie — a talk that 
all club women should take to heart and strive 
to follow. 

South Side Ebell Club believing strongly in 
reciprocity and passing on to others all things 
good, had invited several other small federated 
clubs to be its guests on that day, and share Dr. 
Bertola's visit with it. Among those clubs in- 
vited were the Slauson Woman's Club, Hunting- 
ton Park Ebell, Huntington Park Woman's 
Club, Florence Woman's Club, EbeU Club of 
Bell and Hollenbeck Ebell. Following the reg- 
ular morning session an informal reception was 
held, thus giving all an opportunity to informal- 



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you Can Buy 3C At These 

Places — , 

LOS ANGELES 

A. & O. 

Broadway Department Store 

The May Co. 

HOLLYWOOD 

Carty Br03. 

FLINTRIDGE 

Flintridge Grocery Co. 

BEVERLY HILLS 

R. P. O'Connor 

PASADENA 

F. C. Nash Co. 

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LONG BEACH 

The Wall Co. 

RIVERSIDE 

C. F. Elder 

Alfred M. Lewis 

Sweet Grocery Co. 



CHARM 



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SAN BERNARDINO 

McNeil's Grocery 

Golden Rule 

Bates Grocery 

ARCADIA 

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MONTROSE 
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MONROVIA 
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SIERRA MADRE 
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MONETA 

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GLEN DALE 

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COLTON 

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Page 26 



The CLUBWOMAN 




The Spacious Gardens of Elliott School for Girls Oiier Unusual Opportunities for 
Presenting Colorful Pageants and Pantomimes. Students of all Ages Eagerly Antici- 
pate the Annual' May Day Programs and Special Numbers are Arranged Weiks 
in Ad'vance of Presentation. 



EDUCATIONAL NOTES 

!' i - By Jean B. Kentle 

A delightful entertainrn«nt was given recently by 
Miss Gladys Lott at the Girls' Collegiate School in 
Glendora, with Mrs. Blanche Rogers Lott at the 
piano. Miss Lott has come recently to the school as 
teacher of expression, and is widely and favorably 
known for her charming recitals. With inimitable 
grace she rendered songs and sketches of childhood in 
three groups entitled, "Memories of Childhood," 
"What Mother Nature Tells" and "Just Kiddies." 

The annual formal dance was given recently at 
Westlake School for Girls with Miss Frederica Dc 



TO OUR PRESS CHAIRMEN 



Articles not appearing in February issue 
of the Clubwoman were received too late and 
will appear in our next issue. 



VOICE AND SILENT SINGING 

Exercises by which great singers build and restore the 

voice. Equally ^ valuable for the health and speaking 

voice of those who do not sing. 

Mme. Irwin Kellogg 

Friday Morning Club House. Mondays and Fridays. 
Res. Phone WHitney 7793. FAber 16+8. 



Laguna and Miss Jessica Smith Vance as hostesses. 
Members of the faculty assisted the hostesses. The 
auditorium, class rooms and promenades were beau- 
tifully decorated with palms, spring flowers and flags. 



WESTLAKE SCHOOL 

FOR GIRLS 

Resident and Day School 
333 S. Westmoreland Ave. Los Angeles 



KENWOOD HALL 

Resident and day school for girls. Sub-primary 
through High School. Spanish, French. Expres- 
sion. Dancing included in regular tuition. 675 
S. Vermont Ave., Los Angeles. WAshington 1612. 



LosANGELES : 617.6I9S.Broadway 
Pasadena : Colorado al Los Robles 

Apparel for Women, Misses and Juniors 



iMARCH, 1926 



Page 27 



SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 

As a result of personal inquiry The Clubwoman takes pleasure in commending to California 
clubwomen the schools whose announcements appear in The Clubwoman. 



NEWLY LOCATED IN GLENDORA 
FOOTKILLS 

(§irls!' Collegiate Retool 

Day and Boarding School 
Thirty-fourth year. Accredited Elast and 
West. New Buildings. Miss Parsons and 
Miss Dennen, Principals. Tel. Glendora 

44783. City office "Ask Mr. Foster." 

Information Service — Robinson's Dept. 
Store, 7th St. and Grand Ave. Tel. BR. 
4701. 

. Cumnock ^cftool 

Thirty-First Year 

School of Expression, Academy and accredited 

high school in Class A, preparing for western 

and eastern universities. 

Complete courses in 

Vocal Interpretation of Art 

Literature Public Speaking 

Literary Appreciation Journalism 

Story-Telling Story Writing 

Voice and Diction Dramatic Art 

Aesthetic Dancing 

HELEN A. BROOKS, Director 

5353 West Third Street 

GRanite 3253 GR anite 3353 Los Angeles 



University of Southern California 

Bulletins with full description of 

courses on application 

Address Registrar 

University of Southern California 

35th and University Ave. Los Angeles 



ELLIOTT SCHOOL 

FOR GIRLS 

Residence and Day School. Sub-Primary 
through Eleventh Grade. Ideal Home 
Life. Character Building. Superior Edu- 
cational Advantages. Out-Door Classes. 
MARTHA COLLINS WEAVER. Principal, 
Gramercy Place at Pico Blvd., Los Angeles 



"The Coming West Point of the West" 

San Diego Army & Navy 
Academy 

The Academy enjoys the highest Scholastic rat- 
ing of the Univ. of Calif. — "Division A." It is 
under Government supervision. It emphasizes 
Christian Character Training. Address for infor- 
mation Col. Thos. A. Davis, Pres. Pacific Beach. 
Calif. 



jUatlborougf) ^cijool for (girls! 

Established 1889 
S029 W. 3rd St. Los Angeles 

Boarding and Day School 

Accredited to Eastern and Western 
Colleges 

Ada S. Blake, A. B., Principal 

PAGE MILITARY ACADEMY 

A BIG SCHOOL FOR LITTLE BOYS 

The largest of Ita class In America. Everything adapted 
to meet the needs of the smaller boy. Five fireproof 
buildings; seven-acre campus; seventeen resident teachers. 
Here a boy la taught self-reliance. Through military 
training he acquires habits of exactness, the spirit <A 
team work and co-operation and also energy and initia- 
tive — the best preparation for life, no matter what pro- 
fession he may follow. Let our Catalogue tell you all 
about our echool. 

ROBERT A. GIBBS, Headmaster 

1257 Cochran Avenue 

laiplre 9103. LOS ANGELES. CAL. 



URBAN 

Military Academy 

The Great Outdoor School 

for the building of Body and Brain and Character 
with Sports and Pastimes. Under Matchless Con- 
ditions. Address the Secretary, Miss Keller, 637 

Wilcox Ave., Los Angeles. 



Pacific Military Academy 

Culver City 

Boarding and Day School. Beautiful new Italian 
Renaissance type buildings. Excellent Faculty. 
Out-door Classes. All athletics, swimming, gym- 
nasium, horseback riding and music. Enter any 
time in Grammar or High School. References 
required. For catalogue write Secretary or Phone 
Culver City 3294. 



The Greenwood School 

FOR GIRLS 

Select Resident and Day School. Limited Num- 
ber. In Session All Year. Principals: Mrs. M. 
Greenwood (Newnham College, Cambridge), Mr. 
H. F. Greenwood. B.A. (Corpus Christi College. 
Cambridge). 5928 Franklin Avenue, Hollywood. 



Page 28 



The CLUBWOMAN 



ly meet and greet Dr. Bertola. 

On February 26 the South Side Ebell nTade 
the yearly pilgrimage to the County Farm. The 
Social Service section and the Rambler section 
joined forces this year in sponsoring the affair 
and believing there might be others than them- 
selves virho might care to share in this visit 
of mercy, extended an open invitation to anv 
and all who might care to go. The affair was a 
tremendous success, and all who had even a 
small part in thus making it a gala day fof the 
dear old people at the farm, felt more than amply 
repaid for their effort. Scores and scores of 
home-made cakes were made and taken out, that 
each of the more than 1600 inmates might have 
his or her share. A splendid musical and liter- 
ary program — especially appropriate to the oc- 
casion — had been prepared and as ward after 
ward was visited and heart after heart had been 
cheered, none but felt a sense of exoiltation and 
realized that after all we are our brother's 
keeper and it is the duty of everj' one to do all 
in their power to lighten the last days and hours 
of these old people, who though less fortunate 
than ourselves, are, when all is said and done, 
God's people, even as you and I. 

The programs at the regular meetings this 
month have been all that could be asked for, 
as speakers have been above par, each and every 
one delivering his message in a manner that 
"all who run might read." And the assisting art- 
ists have also done much to add to the success 
of these meetings. 

At the club's regular monthly luncheon, Mrs. 
Mary Pulling, South Side's second president, 
was guest of honor. 

This being a month replete with birthdays of 
national note, the most of the decorative scheme 
was patriotic. Mrs. Custer, chairman, used the 
ever effective red, white and blue. Bess Maberry, 
toastmistress, and those following with responses, 
also carried out the patriotic trend of thought 
and toasted many of our most famous and be- 
loved national presidents. 

Spring is here but South Side Ebell shows no 
sign of ennui as each and every officer, chairman 
and curator is teeming over with a readiness to 
make our club numerically as it is now in all 
other qualifications, the best among the best. 



MONTEBELLO WOMAN'S 
CLUB 

By Mabel E. Kennedy, Press Chairman 

The Montebello Woman's Club has been do- 
ing big things this year and the high lights of her 
accomplishments will always be important events 
in her history. 



First, the building and moving into her new 
clubhouse. 

Second, the community activities that the club 
has taken part in, and third, the interest of the 
club in international and California history. 

The club has played a large part in making 
possible the landscaping of and planting the new 
city park of Montebello. It is urging the plant- 
ing of trees on all streets which are now with- 
out them, and it is also cooperating with the city 
trustees in their plan to build a city library. 

The programs of the club have stressed "In- 
ternational Relations" and "California History." 
Miss Lloy Galpin, teacher- of history in the 
Los Angeles High School, spoke on "The World 
Court," and on May 20 an interesting program 
on Foreign Relations will be given. At the 
Washington Birthday banquet Mrs. J. C. Mc- 
Manus of Los Angeles, sp>oke on "The League 
of Nations." Mrs. Florence Schoneman spoke on 
"Early California History" and on March 18, 
Mrs. A. S. C. Forbes, district chairman of land- 
marks, will speak on "History and Landmarks 
of California." Mrs. George E. Wilfert, chair- 
man of landmarks of the Montebello Woman's 
Club, spoke on "The Battle of Montebello" be- 
fore the History and Landmarks Club of Los 
Angeles. 




For 
Every Baking 
Purpose 



^s Flour 




Your Grocer Has It 



MARCH, 1926 



Page 29 



One of the most delightful sodal affairs of the 
club was the annual Washington's Birthday ban- 
quet at which the husbands of the club members 
were the honored guests. Mrs. Truman Cole 
was the general chairman in charge of the din- 
ner. Mrs. N. J. Brown, Jr., vice-president, 
prepared and presented a very pleasing program. 
Seated at the table of the president, Mrs. Charles 
W. Schaack were the officer; and past-presidents 
of the club and their guests. 

Mrs. J. D. jMintier gave a history of the club 
and the following members who have belonged 
since 1909, responded: Mrs. S. C. Hichborn, 
Mrs. R. N. Bird, Mrs. Ella D. Townsend, Mrs. 
B. E. Coffman, Mrs. George E. Wilfert, Mrs. 
W. P. Temple, ]Mrs. B. L. Stevenson, Mrs. 
Mildred Taylor, Mrs. F. H. Allen, Mrs. A. 
Taylor, Mrs. Fred Darcy, and Mrs. J. D. Min- 
tier. 



THE CALIFORNIA HISTORY 

AND LANDMARK STUDY 

CLUB OF SANTA 

MONICA 

By Mrs. Fred G. Norton, Corresponding Secretary 

An historical pageant was held at the home of 
the president, ^Irs. A. X. Wilmot, for the 
Christmas party. Members came in costume 
and several carried flags for the period they 
represented. Each spoke of her date, giving in- 
teresting data about that time. Some little girls 
held the flag of that particular time of which 
the speaker was telling. 

The large fireplace was filled with stockings, 
which the members brought, filled with a gift 
and something pertaining to the country repre- 
sented, such as candy tamales from the "Mex- 
ican senora." Refreshments were served by the 
"Chinese ladies." The dining table w^as deco- 
rated with California's flags, as well as larger 
flags in a group in the living room. These the 
president made for the occasions when she gives 
a talk on "California and Her Flags." 

This club was the first in the Bay District to 
instigate a movement for the naming of the new 
Second Street (Santa Monica) bridge according 
to historic precedents. 



NEWHALL WOMAN'S CLUB 

By Mrs. A. B. Perkins, Press Chairman 
It has taken a number of years for the wom- 
an's club to become firmly established and now 
we are coming into our own. 

Four years ago last month a comparatively 
small group of women gathered in a hall and 
decided to organize a club. The following month 
these same women again gathered, augmented by 
a few more. The third month our club was 
fairly established. 

Four years — to some long years, but to us short 



joyful years. Our town was then considered 
unfriendly but now, thanks to the spirit and zest 
of our women, strangers at our parties leave 
feeling that they are no longer strangers. 

Our clubhouse is a club home, not merely four 
walls with a roof and in this delightful home we 
have our meetings, dances, dinners, card parties 
and various gatherings. The mere mention of 
an affair of any kind brings forth our members 
and in this kindly atmosphere we work or play. 

Afternoons, there have gathered members 
armed with needles, thimbles and scissors. The 
result — three quilts sold or given away and one 
well started to be raffled. 

At a recent meeting the World Court was dis- 
cussed and I really believe America's leading 
statesmen would have been keenly interested in 
the opinions of the various members. 

There being only a limited space it is diffi- 
cult to tell even a small percentage of our 
achievements but I repeat that clubs are coming 
into their own and must be credited with their 
accomplishments. 



LETTER CARRIERS' AUX- 
ILIARY 

By Grace M. Gage, Press Chairman 
Ladies Auxiliary No. 52, National Association 
of Letter Carriers, having closed a pleasant and 



If the 
Ladies 



would insist on "Inglewood Chairs" 
from their dealers, our factory could 
give employment to many more peo- 
ple. We make quality dining chairs in 
period patterns, breakfast tables and 
chairs, arm rockers, etc. 

Building up California industries 
helps you as well as us. 



Inglewood Manufacturing 
Compauiy 

Inglewood California 



Page 30 



The CLUBtVOMAN 



prosperous year, is starting the New Year full 
of enthusiasm and inspiration. 

Our new officers: President, Mrs. Harry 
Lamp ; vice-president, Mrs. F. Frank ; recording 
secretary, Mrs. B. R. Jordan ; financial secre- 
tary, Mrs. E. O. Linton; treasurer, Mrs. D. L. 
Morton; mistress-at-arms, Mrs. Rhoda Miller, 
have been installed, our various committees have 
been appointed and are on the job. We are 
sure this will be the best year yet because we 
aim to make it that. 

In line with the main purpose of our organ- 
ization, as auxiliary to the National Association 
of Letter Carriers, Branch 24, our special effort 
will be concentrated on H. B. 7 and S. 786, the 
enlargement of our membership and problems 
which present themselves for solution from time 
to time in the carriers' line of \\ ork. 

At our social meetings we expect, as in the 
past, to devote ourselves to needlework for the 
General Hospital or other worthy causes. 



CALIFORNIA HISTORY AND 
LANDMARKS CLUB 

By Mrs. E. M. Timerhoff, Press Chairman 

As usual the February session of California 
History and Landmarks Club, Mrs. Florence 
Schoneman presiding, was held at the Ebell, on 
the 18th, the program opening at 3 o'clock with 



Mary Belle Chapman in a group of "Old Cali- 
fornia Songs," her interpretation a replica of 
Delphina Sarta Cuz de Chapman, of a quartei 
of a century ago, her own "beautiful songbird 
mother." Speaker for the afternoon, Mrs. 
George Wilfert of the Montebello Woman's 
Club, gave "The Battle of Montebello." This 
was the second in a list of programs on the "Bat- 
tlefields of Los Angeles County," these to lead 
up to the marking of Dominguez Battlefield, in 
which the club plans to have a part before the 
close of the year. 

The club will entertain the State President, 
Dr. Mariana Bertola, jointly with the Catholic 
Woman's Club, at the latter's clubhouse, March 
4. From 12 to 2 p. m., a luncheon honoring 
the state guest by the Catholic Women's Club 
will prevail, Dr. Bertola speaking on "Federa- 
tion." From 2 to 4, the California History and 
Landmarks Club present a short program, the 
artists being Elenita Sepulveda Snyder, soloist ; 
Francis Dexter, violinist ; Florence Howard 
Millare (composer) pianist; and the Senoritas 
Rowland and Yorba, dancers; at the conclusion 
of this Dr. Bertola will speak on the Department 
of California History and Landmarks. The 
club press chairman will be hostess to the city 
club editors who will be special guests. 

Tea will be served by the Junior Auxiliary 
Girls of the Catholic Woman's Club, under 




Produced for 
ParticulcU* People, 
People That Think, 
People Not Satisfied 
With Common Milk. 
People willing to pay 
A Small Advance for 
Particular Milk. 



CALL ARDEN PAIPV 



MARCH, 1926 



Page 31 



chairmanship of Miss Georgia Sinclair; Miss 
Grace Stoermer, state chairman, and Mrs. A. S. 
C. Forbes, district chairman of California His- 
tory and Landmarks, will pour. Guests will be 
members of the C. H. and L. sections, and their 
presidents. Miss Mary Rhjdes, first vice-presi- 
dent of the club, will serve as hostess chairman. 
Her committee, the officers and directors of the 
club, and the chairman, curator, and secretary 
of the History and Landmarks section of the 
Catholic Woman's 'Club. Mrs. James Birney 
Lorbeer, district president of the federation, and 
her board of officers and chairman, in session 
that day, will adjourn in time to be special guests 
for the tea hour. 



RAILWAY MAIL AUXILIARY 

By Mrs. M. I. Clemmens, Press Chairman 
Interest in better films was manifested by the 
Women's Auxiliarj' of the Railway Mail Asso- 
ciation when its February meeting was turned 
into a picture party and a goodly number of 
members and their husbands, under direction of 
Mrs. Dr. Floyd Jackman, chairman of good 
films, spent the forenoon at the Loew State 
Theater. "Just Suppose" is being shown there 
and Richard Barthelmess is very pleasing in the 
role of Prince Rupert, heir to the throne of Ko- 
ronia. A pretty romance woven into the story 
involves Lois Moran, a comparatively new star. 
Although rated as a Class B production, the play 
is clean and the acting good, both of which qual- 



ities make for better films. 

Dinner at the Rosslyn Hotel was particularly 
enjoyable because a number of postal clerks were 
able to accompany their wives. 

At 2 p. m. the meeting was called to order by 
Mrs. H. H. Graham, president. A very impres- 
sive and loving tribute to the memory of Mrs. 
Charles H. Toll written by Mrs. J. B. Lor- 
beer, district president, was read by the secre- 
tary. 

A motion was made and carried to furnish the 
English-speaking women of the Goodwill In- 
dustries with a noon luncheon soon. An appeal 
from the Goodwill Day Niursery for bibs is be- 
ing taken care of by the Philanthropy committee. 
Reports were given by good films, courtesy, fed- 
eration and press chairmen. 



GLEASON PARLIAMENTARY 
CLUB 

By Mrs. Thomas R. Murchison, Press Chairman 
Owing to the illness of Mrs. F. T. Bicknell, 
president emeritus of the Los Angeles Audobon 
Society, Mrs. Arthur Mix, district chairman of 
Birds and Flowers, kindly consented to substi- 
tute for her at the last meeting of the Gleason 
Parliamentary Club. 

Mrs. Mix in a very charming manner told of 
the usefulness of birds and described in detail 
one bird family which included the Blackbird, 
Cowbird, Oriole, Meadow Lark and Bobolink, 
and exhibited specimens of each. She called at- 



r I ^HIESE are tHe positions and scores 
* gi-ven AdLoHr samples in five import- 
ant and competitiAre contests for certified 
milk during tHe year 192S: 



February City Health Department, Los Angeles First 

May National Contest, Atlantic City, N. J. First 

July City Health Department, Los Angeles 

September California State Fair, Sacramento First 

November Pacific Slope Dairy Show, Oakland First 



comparative 
scores not 
announced 



98.4% 

99..5% 
99.0% 

97.7% 
98.7% 



The quality and cleanliness of 

this nationally famous milk are 

. unchanging day in and day out. 

JDOVR GUERNSEY CERTIFIED MILK 

for service, telephone TUcker 3560 



Page 32 



The CLUBWOMAN 



tention to the fact that in California we have 594 
different kinds of birds — being surpassed by only 
one state — Texas. Our own state being so long 
from north to south and having such a deh"ghtful 
winter ch'mate, it naturally has a large bird mi- 
gration in spring and fall. In summer there is 
a large vertical migration, the birds going to the 
mountains and canyons and returning in the fall. 

She told the great economic value of birds to 
agriculture by feeding upon insects, larvae, 
worms, weevils, etc., and that they also feed upon 
the destructive weed seed which otherwise would 
choke out many of our beautiful wild flowers. 

In conclusion, Mrs. Mix urged everyone to 
do all in her power to protect birds and wild 
flowers which mean so much to the state of Cali- 
fornia. 

Mrs. E. C. Kesling, circulating chairman for 
the Federation News of the Los Angeles Dis- 
trict has been elected delegate of the Gleason 
Parliamentary Club to the Biennial Convention 
of Women's Federated Clubs in Atlantic City. 

At the meeting on Februar^^ 27 at the Friday 
Morning Club House, Mrs. M. D. Yale spoke 
upon "Proposed Legislative Amendments of the 
State of California." The topic on American 
Citizenship discussed was "Public Education," 
especially California's school system. 



WOMAN'S CLUB OF DOWNEY 

By Judith McKellar, Press Chairman 

Meetings for the month of February of the 
Woman's Club of Downey were exceedingly in- 
teresting and instructive. On February 3 the 
program for Better Films, with Mrs. E. H. 
Welcome, chairman, presentin g Mrs. Alfred 
Graham, district chairman of Motion Pictures, 
and Mrs. E. H. Jacobs, district chairman of 
Preview, each giving splendid talks on their re- 
spective topics, stressing the approved pictures 
for Junior matinees, and the placing in theaters 
of every community, pictures suitable for chil- 
dren. 

As this was the first meeting of the club since 
the passing of the beloved junior past district 
president, Mrs. Charles H. Tole, a feeling of 
sadness was manifest throughout the audience. 
Mrs. Lillian B. Robinson, president, paid a 
splendid tribute to the departed executive, in a 
short talk. 

The "Red Letter Day" and outstanding event 
of the month was the visit of the state chief. Dr. 
Mariana Bertola, on February 8, when the 
Downey club was hostess to representatives from 
the following: Whittier Woman's Club, East 
Whittier Club, Norwalk, Artesia and Bell- 
flower clubs, joined in honoring their State Pres- 
ident. 

At 1 o'clock luncheon was served by the pres- 
ident, Mrs. Robinson, and board of directors. 



and advisory board, with Dr. Bertola and Mrs. 
Harry Louis Stroh, district chairman of Infor- 
mation and Reciprocity, as honor guests. The 
Girls' League of the High School, and the dean 
of girls, Mrs. Glen Campbell, and eighth grade 
girls were present to hear Dr. Bertola, who in 
addressing the audience on club work, said that 
"the first requisite of an ideal club is the fos- 
tering of organized friendliness which goes far 
toward the success of any organization." On this 
line she speake very feelingly of the last meet- 
ing she had with Mrs. Toll, when they were 
planning the program for the state meeting in 
May. One item was the formation of ont 
grand chorus from the Music section of clubs 
of the northern and southern parts of the state, 
thus united. 

We must have the cooperative spirit in every 
club that it may function in club life and be one 
of the real constructive forces in the whirl of 
wheels that go to make up the general federa- 
tion. Dr. Bertola spoke to the girls of the 
school on character building, self control and 
service, saying, "We pay for the space we oc- 
cupy by service." 

The Woman's Club of Downey was exceed- 
ingly fortunate in being the first club of the •^ 
Southland to receive the official visit of the state 
chief, she coming to Downey on the day of her 
arrival in the south. 

The second of a series of luncheons to be 
given by the combined Music sections of the five 
clubs, namely, Woman's Club of Downey, 
Whittier, East Whittier, Norwalk, Artesia and 
Bellflower, was given at Downey on Febru- 
ary 25 when early American music was fea- 
tured, each section represented furnishing one 
number and Grace Widney Mabee, state chair- 
man of Music was honor guest and speaker. 
A 1 o'clock colonial luncheon was served by 
dames garbed in gowns of colonial times. These 
united section meetings from the different clubs 
is proving a splendid force of cooperation. 



THE NEPTUNIAN CLUB 

By Maude C. Withers, Press Chairman 
The Neptunain Club has, through necessity, 
been devoting most of its time toward raising 
funds, serving dinners, luncheons, giving dances 
and holding food sales, card parties, etc. To- 
morrow we are anticipating a very successful 
luncheon with Mrs. Rene Knox as chairman. 
Mrs. C. E. Jenkins, Ways and Means chairman 
is working on a Plunkett manufacturer's dinner 
for April. However, our social days have not 
been altogether without profit. Some interesting 
pai>ers have been given on the Missions, early 
California history, traces of Chinese settlers in 
California, pioneers, natural beauty spots, land- 
marks and interesting facts brought out on birds, 



MARCH. 1926 



Page 33 



Directory of California Products 



For the convenience of the seventy thousan 
who have enthusiastically subscribed to the campa 
sible way the use by Californians of California pr 
paign, presents the following partial classified lis 
ping, clubwomen will find this list handy referen 
pledge to buy Califronia-made goods wherever po» 

AWNINGS 

Acme Tent and Awning Co. — Canopies. 
4069 Mission Road, Los Angeles. Tele- 
phone CApitol 7380. 

BUILDING MATERIALS 

Doors-Sash-Screens — Veneered Doors, High 
Grade Interior Finish — Pacific Door & 
Sash Co. 

Hardwood Floor Finishers and Contractors 
— National Floor Co., Los Angeles. 

Mirrors, Sand, Plaster, Vitrolite — Raphael 
Glass Co., Los Angeles. 

Pioneer Paper Co., Manufacturers of Roof- 
ings. 

Sash-Doors-Hardwoods-Hardware — Frank 
Graves Sash, Door and Mill Co. 

CLOTHING 
"Ribstitched," Bathing Suits 
-Pacific Knitting Mills, Los 



"Bentsknit," 
and Sweaters 
Angeles. 

"Summers Quality" outing and work cloth- 
ing for men and boys — Summers Mfg. 
Co., Inc. 

CARPET CLEANING 
City Steam Carpet Cleaning Works, John 
Bloeser, Main 0430. New Rugs. 

FOODS 
Honey Nut Bread — "It's the Flavor" 
Baruch Baking Co., 3545 Pasadena Ave. 
Phone CApitol 5 770. 

Biscuits, crackers, etc. — Pacific Coast Bis- 
cuit Co., Los Angeles. 

Capitol Products, flour, etc. — Capitol Mill- 
ing Co., Los Angeles. 

Christopher Co., L. J. — Quality Ice Cream 
and Candies. 

Faultless Bread — "Let your daily bread be 
Faultless." Faultless Bread Bakery, Los 
Angeles. 

Globe "Al" Flour, Macaroni Products and 
Cereals — Globe Grain and Milling Co., 
Los Angeles. 

Iris Brand "Over 200 Wonderful Things to 
Eat" — Distributed by Haas, Baruch & 
Co., Los Angeles. 

Morola — Nut Margarine, Morris & Co., Los 
Angeles. 



d clubwomen of California and the many others 
ign of the women's clubs to promote in every poa- 
oducts, The Clubwoman, mouthpiece of the cam- 
t of Classified products. In planning their shop- 
ce guide to what to order in carrying out their 
sibie. 

Olson's Bread, "O So Good" — Olson Bak- 
ing Co., Los Angeles. 

Puritas Vacuum-packed Coffee — a Los An- 
geles product, at most grocers. 

Miss Saylor's, Inc., Unusual Chocolates, 
6752 Venice Blvd., Culver City. 

FURNITURE AND HOUSE FITTINGS 
Barker Bros., 716-738 South Broadway — 
Complete Furnishers of Successful Homes 
— Our "Own Make" and "Mastermade" 
Upholstered Furniture and Hand-tailored, 
"individualized" Mattresses and Box 
Springs. 
Inglewood Furniture — Inglewood Manufac- 
turing Co., Inglewood, Cal. 

Kling Furniture — Kling Manufacturing Co., 

Los Angeles. 
Kwality Pillows, etc. — Kwality Feather Co., 
Los Angeles. 

Los Angeles Can Co. — Manufacturers of 
Tin Cans for all purposes. 
Sanotuf Mattress, furniture — Roberti Bros., 

Los Angeles. 
Stockwell Neverstretch Mattress — L. W. 

Stockwell Co., Los Angeles. 
Upholstered Furniture — Soronow's Furni- 
ture Manufacturing Co., Los Angeles. 
Window Shades — Window Shade Products 
Company, 910 East Fourth St., Los An- 
geles. 
"Zenith" Upholstered Furniture and Mat- 
tresses — Bailey-Schmitz Co., Los An- 
geles. 
Citizens Independent Ice & Cold Storage 
Co., 61 0-620 South Raymond Ave., Pasa- 
dena, California. Phone Colorado 30. 

GASOLINE AND MOTOR OIL 
Ventura Gasoline "California's Best," Ven- 
tura Motor Oil (Paraffin-Base) — Ventura 
Refining Co., Los Angeles. 

MOTOR TRUCKS 
Moreland Motor Truck Co., Los Angeles. 

ST ORAGE BATTERIES 
Hobbs Storage Batteries, Hobbs Storage 
Battery Corp., Los Angeles. 

WATER HEATERS 
De Luxe and Supreme Gas Water Heaters 
— General Water Heater Corp., 1601 
Compton Ave. 



Page 34 



The CLUBWOMAN 



lakes, trees and mountains of California. 

Eleven club members motored to Long Beach 
to attend the President's Council last Wednes- 
day, a day thoroughly enjoyed. Our official 
board has been invited to act as co-hostess with 
Redondo and other clubs in this vicinity on the 
occasion of Dr. Bertola's visit on the 8th of 
March to the Redondo Woman's Club. 

Not least of all we have had several new and 
valuable members added to the roll. 



SOROPTIMIST CLUB 

(Continued from Page 12) 
the happiness of seeing the working out of our 
educational plan is quite as great in attainment 
as in anticipation. We have named three of 
these for our first three presidents — we have had 
but three for Mrs. Maynard is serving her sec- 
ond term in office — so that we have The Oda 
Faulconer, The Mary Jean Henley, and The 
Gertrude C. Maynard Scholarships of The Sor- 
optimist Club already established in the Univer- 
sity of Southern California, Southern Branch. 
Three more are to be named by popular vote at 
the next business meeting. 

Our Parisian Business and Fashion Show on 
March 23d, from 11 a. m. to 3:30 p. m. in the 
Supper and Palm Rooms of the Hotel Biltmore, 
is our next big interest. Luncheon tickets are 
$1.50 and it is open to the public if reser\'ations 
are made beforehand with the secretary'. Mar- 
ion Lois who has staged affairs of this sort in 
Paris has some clever ideas and we are on tip toe 
to see what she will do with the abundant ma- 
terial she has on hand for a "different" kind of 
a display. 



A TRIBUTE TO 
ELEANOR JOY TOLL 

Because it has been our privilege to have had 
so intimate a glimpse of the rare and beautiful 
spirit of Eleanor Joy Toll: 

We, the Soroptimist Club of Los Angeles, 
wish to express to her bereaved family and her 
many friends, the understanding sympathy of a 
sorrow shared. 

As our tribute to her self-forgetting devotion 



ASK FOR 

CAPITOL 
PRODUCTS 

MANUFACTURED BY 

A HOME INDUSTRY 



to her home and to the world we hereby pledge 
ourselves as Club Women, as waives and as 
mothers, to carry on the torch of vision and of 
loving service which she so unfalteringly bore. 
We shall be satisfied with no lesser goal than the 
shining fulfillment she has attained, the knowl- 
edge of good rendered to every soul her radiant 
personality touched. 

Adopted at meeting of the Board of Direc- 
tors for The Soroptimist Club of Los Angeles 
at the meeting of February the eighth, 1926. 



MARY WILLIAMS CLUB OF 
AVALON 

By Mrs. D. M. Renton, Press Chairman 
It has been some time since we have written 
for The Clubwoman, but we want the readers 
to know that the Mary Williams Club of Ava- 
lon is very much alive, under the leadership of 
our president, Mrs. M. B. Dunkle. In 1925 
we celebrated our twenty-fifth birthday. Twen- 
ty-five years ago Mrs. Mary Page Williams, of 
Avalon, invited a few of her friends and neigh- 
bors to her home for the purpose of reading late 
books, magazines, etc. They kept this up till 
finally they organized a club and called it the 
Mary Williams Club of Avalon, in honor of 
the founder, whom they dearly loved. 

Mrs. Williams passed away quite a few years 
ago, but the work she started goes on, and we 
feel sure she would be very happy could she but 
know how interested the ladies are in this club i 
and the many worth while things we are doing | 
for the good of the community. 

We have about 50 active members. At our 
meeting on Thursday afternoon, we took in five 
new members and four more names were pro- 
posed for membership. So you see we are grow- 
ing. Last September over 70 children of the i 
Orthopaedic Hospital were entertained at Ava- '| 
Ion, as the guests of Mr. William Wrigley and 
the ladies of our club acted as hostesses. At 
Christmas our club sponsored for the Commu- 
nity Christmas Tree which was given at the 
Strand Theater. We arranged the program 
which consisted of two numbers. The first was 
a Radio Humanophone number and it made a 
great hit; the second number was "School Days, ; 
given by the grown ups. They were dressed as-l 
children and the things they did were most amus- 
ing. The ladies made 350 red and white flan- 
nel stockings for the children and filled them 
with oranges, nuts and candy. Our- tree was 
beautiful and of course we had a Santa Claus. 
Over 200 were turned away. We have quite a 
large winter papulation and of course many 
visitors. We also sponsor the Easter Sunrise ; 
Service. 



i 




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APRIL, 1926 



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Office, 706 Pacific Southwest Bank Bldg. 
Telephone EL. 2734; if no answer, EL. 1170 
Mail Address Box 26, South Pasadena, Cal. 

Subscription Price 50 Cents Per Year, Ten Cents the Copy Send subscriptions to Mrs. Bert Clifford, Box 26, 

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Edited by the Press Chairmen of the Clubs Represented 
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AVERILL STUDY CLUB 

By Clara S. Wardner, Press Chairman 
The Civics programs of the Averill Study Club, 
Mrs. Estelle B. Omdalen, chairman, have dealt 
with the plans for the union station. 

Mr. Storrow spoke in January on the Plaza 
plan for a station. March 9, Mr. Brennan told 
of the "Carriers' Los Angeles Railway Station 
Plan." 

For its social service work, the club has been 
interested in Maternity Cottage, Dr. Maude 
Wilde's milk bottle fund, and the Needle Work 
Guild. March 16 Mrs. William Baurhyte, 
president of the cottage, gave a talk on the work 
that goes on, down at this hospital for mothers 
and babies. 

Since the club is essentially literary, programs 
given over to the review of books and magazines 
are much enjoyed. 

.March 23, Mrs. Anna Smith, chairman of the 
Books and Magazines section had different mem- 
bers give short articles, poems and quotations. 

Mrs. William B. Hunnewell, on March 30, 
gave a travel talk, "Half Around the Globe." 



"SILENT SINGING" CLASS 
The first of a series of large classes in the 
new breathing and enunciation course called 
"Silent Singing" was begun on Monday, March 



22 and Friday, the 26th, at the studio of Mme. 
Irw'in Kellogg, in the Friday Morning Club- 
house. The idea is original in that the exercises of 
the greatest singing teachers, formerly attainable 
only through long and expensive vocal study, 
are brought into a short course for club women 
at a nominal price, and for the promotion of 
better speech and better health. 

Mme. Kellogg has talked on the subject over 
radio, at West Side Ebell, Friday Morning Club 
House, and is to talk April 6 at Ebell Better 
Speech section and April 7 for the Woman's 
University Club, and later in the month for 
Rotary. Voice students appeared in recital on 
March 11th, and gave programs for the 
Woman's City Club, March 17, the West Side 
Ebell March 23, Woman's University Club, 
April 7. 



FRIDAY AFTERNOON STUDY 
CLUB, BIG PINE 

By Mrs. Thomas If ebb, Press Chairman 

Burning punks and bursting firecrackers, dis- 
pelling the "devils" or evil spirits that constantly 
obsess the Chinese mind, and fragrant sacred 
lily blossoms, gave a hint of Old Cathay to the 
atmosphere, when the Friday Afternoon Study 
Club met, under the chairmanship of Mrs. 



Page 4 



The CLUBWOMAN 



Thomas Webb, to give its first program on 
China. Members greeted each other — as do the 
Chinese ladies — with hands crossed at airm's 
length, bowing low three times in rapid succes- 
sion. Roll call responses — Current Events in 
China — brought items clipped from the latest 
issue of a Chinese daily. Translated ? No. "A 
little nonsense now and then is relished by the 
wisest men." Instead of the usual opening song, 
Mrs. Ira Uhlmeyer gave a short talk on Chi- 
nese poetry, and followed with the reading of 
several translated poems. Mrs. Zetta Joseph 
provided the program.. Not being able to be 
present, she selected from her Seventh and Eighth 
Grades a number of pupils who under her super- 
vision, prepared and gave the following interest- 
ing numbers, with great credit to themselves and 
their teacher: Physical Geography, illustrated 
with a fine map of her own drawing, Maxine 
Brown; Houseboat Life, Ethel McAfee; The 
Great Wall, Malcomb McDonald ; Agriculture 
and Industries, Henry Houghton ; Silk, Ward 
Rogers. It was a rare treat "Young America" 
— the probable club members of tomorrow, gave 
the ladies, while entertaining them^ with the fas- 
cinating history of this people. Proud mothers 
and friends must have gone away convinced that 
the club efforts are worth while. Light refresh- 
ments and candy — with a box of firecrackers for 
the younger element, closed a pleasant afternoon. 



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CALIFORNIA HISTORY AND 
LANDMARKS CLUB 

By Mrs. E. M. Timerhojf, Press Chairman 

Peculiar interest centered about the month's 
session of California History and Landmarks at 
the Ebell clubhouse, March 18th, at 2 p.m., Mrs. 
Florence Schoneman, presiding. First there was 
the informing talk of Hugh R. Pomeroy, chair- 
man, of County Planning Commission, on "Se- 
pulveda Boulevard Plans," which include all the 
way from San Fernando to Whittier. Ethel 
Graham Lynde followed, speaking on "The 
Status of the Mission Play." The finale was 
also a home interest, being "The Magic Grab 
Bag," by Lillie Newlon Douglas, secretary of 
the Women's Auxiliary of the Goodwill Indus- 
tries, and put many facts regarding the timely 
assistance of the poor, especially the Mexican 
colony, in possession of the audience. One of the 
city's old landmarks, the famous Baker Block, is 
lending itself for the necessary housing. 

The varied interests of this president are wide 
and far reaching. With equal ease, she gives 
a talk on "Spanish Dancing" before the Wa Wan 
Club, then hurries to supervise the sewing class 
(Lenten) of the Catholic Girls' Auxiliary for 
the children of disabled veterans ; going on from 
that point to help plan the benefit performance 
at the Philharmonic, for the rehabilitation of the 



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APRIL, 1926 



Page 5 



^-^-^ Contents '-^ 



Averill Study Club 3 

Friday Afternoon Study Club 3 

California History and Landmarks Club 4 

Friday Morning Club 6 

Woman's Club of HolljTvood 10 

Los Angeles Ebell Club _ 12 

Woman's University Club 16 

Highland Park Ebell Club ,^.... 18 

Wednesday Morning Club 19 

Pasadena Shakespeare Club 20 

Galpin Shakespeare Club 21 

South Side Ebell Club 21 

Los Angeles Audubon Society 22 

Wa-Wan Club _ 23 

College Woman's Club of Long Beach 28 

Woman's Club of Torrance 28 

Woman's Auxiliary R. M. A 28 

Philanthropy and Civics Club 29 

Lincoln Study Club , 29 

Gleason Parliamentary Club _ 29 

Pure Milk 30 

Los Angeles Teachers' Club _ 30, 

Soroptimist Club 32 



Cas^ Adobe, on April 6. This is sponsored by 
several universities, and under supervision of 
the Southwest Museum. On the way home she 
plans her costume for the Spanish Ball of the 
Los Angeles Parlor, Native Daughters given 
the San Bernardino Woman's Club ; her sub- 
ject "History and Landmarks of San Bernar- 
dino County," was well suited to this former 
Mrs. Schoneman was a special speaker at 
March 24. During the recent Orange Show 
worthy owner of one third of the great "San 
Bernardino Rancho," the home place being at 
Yucaipa. 

At the recent reception and tea given by the 
California History and Landmarks club at the 
Catholic Women's clubhouse, Mrs. R. F. S. Dod- 
son, mother of Mrs. Schoneman, wore a three tier 
cream lace costume, of 200 years ago, that was 
most becoming to the dignified little lady of for- 

|nier Spanish glories. Her wrap was one pur- 
chased in Spain 300 years ago, costing at that 

• time $3000. The years since have added to its 
worth. Amethyst beads woven in the fringe 
add to the beauty of the garment. 

Mrs. Grace Goucher, who decorated the audi- 
torium stage with gorgeous Spanish shawls of 

^priceless value, inserting an Indian motif with 
^kill by the use of her own collection of blan- 
kets and baskets, etc., was gowned in splendor 
also, representing old pioneer days. Mrs. 

fGoucher presented the club's offering, a great 

|basket of blossoms, to Dr. Mariana Bertola, 
istate president, and guest of honor. 




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Page 6 



The CLUBWOMAN 




iiimiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiDiiiiiiiiiimiiiDniwiiiiniiiiiiHiiUiiiiigiiiH 

FRIDA?^ -MORNING GliUB 




The Prize Play Contest of the Friday M orn'ing Club by Mabel Wing Castle. 
Chairman Prize Play Committee 



Contest in itself is a dramatic word. It con- 
notes challenge, conflicts, conclusions. It is the 
focus of attention and energy at a given time. 
Contest is pre-eminently the method of nature 
and of our present civilization, however waste- 
ful. How many apples come from a shower of 
apple-blossom petals? What is the percentage 
of "turn-over" in any great industrial plant? 

Ours is, pre-eminently, a dramatic community 
with theatres and theatres and Little Theatres, 
with motion-picture palaces and their blazing 
first nights ; with its yearly Mission Play runs, 
and its Pilgrimage Play parallel run ; with its 
Pasadena Community Theatre and its many 
small semi-professional and amateur groups of 
players ; with its Writers' Club and always the 
challenge of Hollywood. 

Courses in dramatic history, criticism and com- 
position are offered by the Universities and Uni- 
versity Extension, by public and private schools, 
Drama League and private teachers. The way 
to technique is open — and the way of play-writ- 
ing without gruelling technique does not exist. 

What woman's club does not have its active 
drama section? In the few years that I have 
known the Friday Morning Club Drama Com- 
mittee under Dr. Dorothea Moore, Mrs. J. 
Wells Smith, the late Mrs. May Goldman and 
Mrs. William French Thurston, it has been 
the center of much enthusiasm and much activ- 
ity. The last two years, especially, have pro- 
vided a multiplicity of meetings, luncheons and 
plays readings and animated discussions of "the 
written play," conducted by Mrs. J. Wells 
Smith ; a motion-picture pre-vie^v committee, 
headed by Mrs. Louise Castle; a children's mat- 
inee motion-picture committee under Mrs. John 
Vruwick ; an amateur dramatic committee, this 
year having Mrs. Andrew Blackmore as chair- 
man ; matinee luncheon, with Mrs. William 
Kirtley Chambers as hostess, and prominent pro- 
fessionals of the stage and screen as luncheon 
speakers. The Dr^ma Committee has provided 
also professional drama — Miss Van Valkenburg 
and Mr. Maurice Browne in the powerful trag- 
edy, "The Mother of Gregory," and the Burn- 
ham Players in a delightful comedy, "Mr. Tis- 
ter's Temerity." 

A most interesting class in psychology had its 
beginning under the wing of the Drama Com- 
mittee, with university professors for lecturers, 
the whole undertaking being financed by the 
guest tickets that were sold. 



Theatre audiences, Mr. Clayton Hamilton 
points out, are found by Mr. Belasco to aver- 
age twenty-two or twenty-three years of age. 
They are, of course, mixed audiences. A Fri- 
day Morning Club audience, on the other hand, 
viewed from the platform or the balcony, pre- 
sents a soft and pleasant pattern of women's 
heads, bobbed, marcelled or otherwise beautifully 
coiffed, with a striking sprinkling of white or 
graying hair. It is preponderatingly a mature, a 
middle-aged, audience, keen, intent. The findings 
of this audience possibly might be typical of many 
other women's clubs, which like this one has a 
coveted platform. 

Can there be, between the mature audience 
of women's clubs and the rather immature audi- 
ences of theatres any closer contacts than by 
committees announcing their winnowings in 
club bulletins, — estimates of current plays and 
motion-pictures? Or should the contacts con- 
tinue to be by admonition of the young who 
come into the domestic radius of club-women? 
It is possible for us, consciously and directly to 
work for Greater Los Angeles in a dramatic 
sense ? 

Audiences like the Friday Morning Club 
include women of all ages, representing char- 
acter, culture, social and civic leadership ; and 
contains recognized writers in its membership. Is 
it thinkable that they cannot draw upon their 
ripe experience for interpretations that might be 
life-savers to wistful, wondering, often blunder- 
ing youth ? But youth is restive under sermons — • 
as is middle age. Both resent censorship and 
admonition. Both go to school — witness night 
schools and University Extension. Both youth 
and middle age attend the theatres, one to en- 
joy, the other, often, it is to be feared, to decry. 
It is no news that sermons, hidden in plays, are 
heard, perhaps heeded. Note how gaily, how 
inevitably Mr. George Bernard Shaw's bril- 
liant ideas flash over the footlights where ser- 
mons per se would drop dead. So it is in plays, 
probably, if plays could be produced by our own 
club-members, that we could pass along what we 
thought important in our ideals, our achieve- 
ments, our points of view, or, if it must be, hor- 
rible examples to be avoided. 

Littera scripta manet is used, I think, as a 
legal warning: "Be careful what you write. It 
can be used against you." Rather I would para- 
phrase the Latin: Writing may i>e an earthly 
immortality . In letters, it can bring lost person- 



APRIL, 1926 



Page 7 



alities back to life. In the briefer forms of lit- 
erature, — poem, one-act play, short story or essay 
— it can be the first step to trying out our crea- 
tive imagination. The second would be to build 
up the indispensable technique that would be an 
unfailing resource in life. 

Why do we fill our days with objective activ- 
ities? If we could compass even a brief quiet 
time daily for the creative spirit, how worth 
while! Perhaps. If we possess the creative imag- 
ination and heart and hand for the drudgen' of 
technique. If not, there is always available the 
game of the honest dairy. 

1 compare the one-act play with the sonnet, 
the orchestral program-piece, the small strug- 
gling group of sculpture. Each expression of 
art is dramatized, simplified, unified, — each has 
climax and emotional appeal. The one-act play 
can make a more direct appeal. It is, says Mr. 
Percival Wilde, "an orderly representation of 
life, arousing emotion in an audience. It is 
characterized by superior unity and economy; it 
is playable in a comparatively short space of 
time; it is intended to be assimilated as a whole." 
One summary of Mr. Wilde's might well be 
framed for every pla}-Avriter's desk : 

"Truth of theme makes a play valid. 

Truth of character makes a play persuasive. 

Truth of situation makes a play entertaining. 

Truthof tmosphere, mood, point of ciew makes 
a play real." 

And, to prove the truth of all of these truths, 
I find they fit exactly the prize plays chosen 
this year by the committee. 

Mr. Wilde, however, will not have the one- 
act play considered as "a trial balloon" for those 
who wish to write or direct or act. He calls 
the one-act play an independent art-form, worth 
while and enduring in itself. "It is the one-act 
technique that is advancing the modern drama 
to the plane upon which it rightly belongs" — 
tlie tightly-u'ritten, logically-connected^ intense- 
ly honest drama of today." I have italicized 
his words as text for all of mine. 

All these ideas float more less hazily in the 
club region, penetrating a little into our sub- 
consciousness. Aside from the noble motive a 
club may have of passing along anything, we 
have our drama committee functioning freely, 
we have our own beautiful stage, our own ama- 
teur dramatic sub-committee, eager to produce 
plaj's; and our own perfectly good professional 
director, Mrs. Park French. Plays appropriate 
to our purpose are scarce as hen's teeth. Per- 
haps we might write our own. 

So, discussing the matter last year in some 
such fashion, Airs. Samuel L. Kreider, presi- 
dent, and her oflScers and Mrs. Thurston, drama 
chairman, organized the prize-play contest of 
one-act plays, suitable for production before the 
Friday Morning Club with the help of the fol- 




Mabel Wing Castle 

Chairman Prize Play Committee of the Friday 

Morning Club 

lowing distinguished and efficient Prize Play 
Committee : 

Mrs. Milbank Johnson, Chairman. 

Mrs. Alexander Macbeth. 

Dr. Dorothea Moore. 

Mrs. Lee A. Phillipps. 

Mrs. John Ne%vton Russell. 

Mrs. Tully Marshall. 

Mrs. Unity Pegues. 

Mrs. Charles L. Wright. 

Certain rules were prescribed to secure with 
greatest fairness to all, original one-act plays, 
to be submitted anonymously by members of the 
club. Certain prizes were offered, to be with- 
held if the judges thought best. 

In the Friday Morning Club Bulletin of 
April, 1925, Mrs. Milbank Johnson announced 
the findings of her committee. A first prize of 
$50.00 had been awarded to "The Delicate 
Child," written by Mrs. E. E. Mclntyre. The 
second prize of $25.00 to "A Pair of Pierrots," 
written by Madeline Blackmore. Honorable 
Mention was accorded to "The Happ)"^ Man- 
ningtons," written by ]VIrs. Lewis A. Groff, a 
charter member; to "An Interlude," written by 
Louise W. Watkins ; and to "In the Comman- 
date's Garden," written by Bertha de Lecuona. 
Mrs. Johnson also reported that the committee 
believed this first contest had been thoroughly 
justified and trusted that a similar contest would 
be held the ensuing year with even larger re- 
sponse. 

In March, Mrs. French and the amateur 
dramatic committee had given a delightful 
morning of three one-act plajs. One by Alice 
Brown, "Joint Owners in Spain," being done 
so very well that it was entered in the California 
Eisteddfod and won the Los Angeles first prize 



Page 8 



The .CLUBfFOM/lN 



banner^ — purple satin with much gold embroid- 
ery of letterings, — to the entire satisfaction of 
the club. This same group has given this play 
elsewhere. 

After this tribute to the indefatigable Mrs. 
French and her Friday Morning Club player- 
group, she was invited to produce in June the 
prize plays with the greatest production pos- 
sibility. These were : 

"A Pair -of Pierrots," by Madeline Black- 
more ; "In the Commandate's Garden," by Bertha 
de Lecuona. Another play rounded out the pro- 
gram, "Venetian Glass," by Amy Requa Russell, 
a club member. Much time and effort were 
given to the production and it was a pleasantly 
excited, proprietary audience that attended the 
prize play program. 
•'' The delightful Pierrot play vras presented 
with much rhythm and the lightness needed. It 
had a certain freshness in the clever psycholog- 
ical twist at the end. Mrs. Blackmore had the 
satisfaction of playing First Pierrot, a charac- 
ter of her own creating. "Venetian Glass" had 
its own mediaeval love-story, ending happily, and 
was very well done. The stage was richly set 
with the club's furnishings, and added to the 
lovely bit of life and color. 

"In the Commandante's Garden" was semi- 
historical, offering a California garden setting 
of real loveliness, and opportunity of various 
lighting effects with plausible and interesting 
dramatic conflict (the need of a play), once the 
mysticism and spirtualism of the play were ad- 
mitted. All parts were creditably taken by mem- 
bers of the club Including, besides Mrs. Black- 
more, Mrs. William Kirtley Chambers, Mrs. 
Richard S. Davis, Mrs. Alfred William Elwood, 
Mrs. Herbert Staunton ]\larshutz, Mrs. S. Les- 
lie Wright. 

It was a well-balanced program, succeeding 
even beyond Mrs. French's hopes, and so much 
enjoyed by the club that the Prize Play Con- 
test apparently was voted quite worth while by 
the audience as it -had been by the committee 
making the awards. 

The Second Prize Play Contest followed "as 
the night the day." And it followed very closely 
in the footsteps of the first. Rules were more 
defined, collaboration was not allowed, public 
reading of plays to be in the contest not per- 
mitted before entering the contest or after that, 
until the prize plays should have been presented 
to the club. This, for the courtesy due the club. 
The greatest stress was laid on preserving the 
anonymity of the writers. This necessitated the 
chairman's working very much in the dark, not 
knowing who had competed the first years — 
and never, even now, knowing the unsuccessful 
contestants. It seems as if a small sub-commit- 
tee of drummer-ups might assist, so that the 




of the Public Library 

able books on the one 

'Mrs. O. P. Clark, 



Photo by VxToque Baker 
Mrs. Park French 

chairman and the committee who were to judge 
need not be embarrassed by possible clues. All 
prutative candidates were asked not to read 
their productions, to others or discuss the char- 
acters or plots. The general literature section 
furnished a list of avail- 
act play. 

president this year, made 
several announcements about the contest. She 
herself hoped there might be heartening comedy 
to delight us all. Surely some plays must have 
been written for her. 

The Second Prize Play Contest opened Octo- 
ber 15 and closed February 15, and not a play 
too late. The chairman was thrilled to receive 
the seventeen pla^s submitted with no clues 
to their authorship. For one person to read sev- 
enteen anonymous plays judicially is an adven- 
ture. For seven very busy persons, widely scat- 
tered in this city and near-by, to read and to 
reach a super-conscientious, and, at last, a unan- 
imous decision, is an achievement. This has 
been accomplished by the following committee : 

Three professional, non-club members, Mrs. 
Eleanor Waring Burnham, Mr. Roger .Noble 
Burnham, Miss Doris Lloyd ; another non-club 
member, ]\Irs. Robert A. Mllllkan, vice-president 
of the Pasadena Community Theatre, and three 
members of the Friday Morning Club, Mrs. 
Alexander Macbeth, ^Jrs. J. Wells Smith and 
the chairman. 

We regret that our owVi Dr. Dorothea Moore, 
and Mr. Dickson Morgan, another professional, 



who were appointed by the committee, were out 
of town on the crucial day of the decision, and 
so, unable to serve. 

Out of deference to the club who furnished 
the prizes and the incentives, including the great 
one of professional production to the play win- 
ning first prize, the committee measured the 
plays primarily by dramatic value and produc- 
tion possibility, — then by significance of theme. 
The universal took precedence over the partic- 
ular, the permanent over the ephemeral, to carry 
out Mr. George D. Baker's important ruling in 
his famous 47 Workshop. Truth of character- 
ization and situation were required, with fresh- 
ness of aspect and dramatic technique sufficient 
to secure a genuine emotional reaction from the 
audience. The result brought delicious comedy, 
timely comedy-drama and genuine tragedy, old 
as the hills — something, we hope, for every taste. 
Four of those who read the plays last yeai 
served this year jan the committee and were able 
to mark a distinct advance in the quality ot 
plays presented in this second prize play contest, ^ 
— more of the "honest drama," more regard foi 
closely-knit construction of plays, more balance 
in the clash of characters, more regard for the 
modern trend, more of what Mr. Brander Mat- 
thews calls "story stifiFening into plot." When a 
prize play contest can provide five plays that 
can be produced — if they are ! — on the Club 
stage, if these plays can be saleable, as the com- 
mittee hopes and produce not only royalties but 
professional rating for the authors, then the club 
may be proud to have unearthed real pla>'vvrights 
and the second prize play contest may well be 
followed by others. 

The other contestants as well as the winners 
have had the thrill of the creative drive and an 
opportunity of measurement which with another 
' committee might have been different. The audi- 
ence, who witness any of the plays produced, 
will see new flashes of truth from that great 
diamond of ten thousands facets that is life. 

I am proud to announce the prize-winning 
plays and their authors, whose names I learned 
a quarter of an hour before I announced them 
to the club : 

First Prize, $50.00 and professional produc- 
tion before the club, to "The Beauty^ Contest," 
by Madeline Blackmore. 

Second Prize, $25,00, to "Gay Draperies," by 
Alice Alden. 

Honorable Mention for "Florida Water," by 
Ada Gilbert Close, and to 

"His Mother," and "Whipped Cream," by 
Marion L. Davidson. 



Bullocks 



Braaaway-HUl 
ana— Seventro 



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The CLUBWOMAN 



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SHAKESPEARE'S LONDON 

By Mary E. Hamlin 
A Talk Given Before the Shakespeare Section of the Woman's Club of Hollywood 



Once upon a time greatness was considered to 
be the outcome of fate, genius, God — but the old 
order changeth, yielding place to new, and in 
this present age, the current belief runs strongly 
toward environment as the great, first cause for 
greatness. 

Age is not always, though often, more right' 
than youth, but certainly few will care to argue, 
much less to deny, that Shakespeare is the prod- 
uct of London, and that the quality of that 
which he gave to posterity is richer, fuller, 
deeper, not in spite of the fact, but because of 
the fact that he came to London while his mind 
was still open and impressionable, and because 
of the further fact that he used the environments 
of that great city much as a general uses armies. 

During his early years in London Shakespeare 
must have been conscious of spiritual growth 
with every day that passed. With his inordi- 
nate appetite for learning, he must every day 
have gathered new impressions in his many- 
sided activities as a hard working actor, a furb- 
isher-up of old plays and finally as a budding 
poet, in whose heart even,' mood thrilled into 
melody and every conception clothed itself in 
dramatic form. He must have felt his heart 
light and free, not least perhaps because he had 
escaped from Stratford. 

The London of Shakespeare's day was not so 
gay as that of Paris, nor so bustling and prosper- 
ous as that of Antwerp, nor so full of splendor 
as that of Venice, yet to the Englishman of that 
day, it was an everlasting wonder. Its towers 
and palaces ; its wonderful old residences, its 
gentlemen's inns ; the beauty of the river ; the 
bustle of commerce ; the number of its foreign- 
ers and its wealth — all invested it with more 
poetry and romance that can be claimed for it 
today. 

Ambitious courtiers, hopeful ecclesiastics, push- 
ing merchants and poetic dreamers, were all 
caught by the fascination of London. Site, an- 
tiquity, life, above all, the abundance of good 
things that make up half life's charm, in the 
shape of early delicacies, costly meats and choice 
wines, all combined to make it a miraculous 
city. 

The external appearance of the city was de- 
cidedly picturesque — old gray walls threw round 
it the arm of military protection. Surrounded 
by villages, splendid oaks and beeches, with its 



skyline broken by walls, towers and fluttering 
flags London's exterior, with little but wood- 
smoke to dull the brightness of the atmosphere, 
presented a charming picture. 

When in 1585 Shakespeare, a provincial youth 
of twenty-one, arrived in London, the original 
limits of the city, the walls thereof, though 
somewhat dilapidated, were still standing and the 
population, variously estimated at between 125,- 
000 and 250,000 was mainly within the walls, 
though beginning to spread beyond it. 

The circuit of the walls was outlined by the 
gates, which were conspicous in structure and 
were still guarded and locked at night. Begin- 
ning at the Tower of London, the names of these 
gates, names which exist to this day, were Aid- 
gate, Bishopgate, Moorgate, Cripplegate, Lud- 
gate and Newgate, the last named being the gate 
through which Shakespeare passed the first time 
he entered London. One wonders if he had any 
premonition of the great and mighty changes that 
^vere to take place in his life, not only his ma- 
terial life, but his thought life, before he finally 
shook the dust of that city from his feet. 

In and around the city were the ruins or par- 
tial ruins of priories and other religious houses, 
the chapel or some portion thereof generally be- 
ing saved for the purpose of the Reformed wor- 
ship, for with Elizabeth, Protestanism came to 
the throne. For the rest, stately ruins, cloisters, 
grassy slopes, evidences of a past, not remote, 
when one of the bulwarks of London against in- 
vaders — bulwarks stronger than the walls of 
the city, was the existence of these ecclesiastical 
demesnes outside the defense of the city. 

The main streets of Shakespeare's London 
were not lighted, and but poorly paved. They 
were thronged, not with wheel traffic, for the 
first carriage was imported into England during 
Elizabeth's reign, but with people qn foot, on 
horseback and even occasionally in litters, while 
these Thames was alive with thousands of boats. 
The Thames presented a dazzling scene ; for cen- 
turies London had grown by the side of her 
river and there only perhaps, was London to be 
seen in her greatness. It did not matter that the 
streets were narrow, for the heart of the city 
was on the river. 

It is not necessary to read the books written 
to prove that Shakespeare must have made an 
ocean voyage, to know where he derived his 



APRIL, 1926 



Page 11 



stories of ocean travel and mishap which we 
find in the Comedy of Errors, Twelfth Night 
and the Tempest. We need not go beyond 
Shakespeare's London for them. 

The English Fleet was often present in the 
river ; there was a large amount of merchant 
shipping and above the Bridge the Thames was 
the chief highway of London. There were thou- 
sands of watermen earning a living on this silent 
highway. Sunburnt men. scarred and bearded 
men, men with looped ear-rings, men who had 
crossed the ocean and from these sources, stories 
of foreign ports and isles would come to Shakes- 
peare's ears, almost without his seeking and 
names of great and interesting cities would strike 
upon his ear, amid London surroundings, while 
the creations of his genius were taking form 
and shape. 

London life in Shakespeare's day was not the 
distinctive town life which we associate with 
the London of today. L'sed as he was to rural 
siehts and sounds, endowed, as we know he \vas, 
v.'ith a love of nature, he would not pine for the 
green fields at home ; he could take a walk out 
into the country ; he could find a forest or as he 
walked through the streets, a flock of wild ducks 
might fly over his head, taking flight from the 
marshes on the north of the city to the river or 
marshes on the south. Nature called to 
Shakespeare ever while he worked and lived in 
London and his habit of loving observation of 
nature and her ways, ^vas not checked bv his 
removal from the meadows and lanes of Strat- 
ford and the winding banks of the Avon. 

In the life of Shakespeare's London the tav- 
ern played a large part. The characteristic of 
Elizabeth's time has been said to have been so- 
ciability ; family life \vas almost unknown and 
men, and women as ■well, gathered at the tav- 
ern to drink, talk and enjoy themselves. Most 
' famous of the taverns of that day was the Mer- 
maid, where poets and wits assembled in the 
memorable "Mermaid Club." There is a tra- 
dition that Raleigh was the founder of these 
meetings of wits at the Mermaid. Here Shakes- 
peare as he listened to the out-pourings of that 
gallant and restless spirit may have heard stories 
of the wars in Flanders and in Ireland in which 
Raleigh served, which afterwards found an echo 
in Othello or the Merchant of Venice. 

When Shakespeare arrived in London, play- 
houses were not allowed in the city proper, they 
; must be outside the walls of the city. For the 
most part they were situated on the swampy 
ground beside the Thames. Ben Jonson as well 
as other writers of that day referred to play- 
goers as "people o' the suburbs" and it was the 
custom to ride on horseback "into the fields, 
plays to behold." We recall that tradition says 
Shakespeare's first job in London was to take 



charge of the horses while gallants and their 
ladies were in the playhouse. 

From the erection of the first playhouse, to 
their suppression at the outbreak of the Civil 
War in England, the Puritan party wages an in- 
creasing warfare against the stage and but for the 
protection of the Court, the Elizabethan drama 
would have come to an untimely end. Follow- 
ing is a Puritan denunciation of the theatre which 
is interesting: 

"Look but upon the common plays in Lon- 
don and see the multitude that flocketh to them. 
Behold the sumptuous houses — a continual mon- 
ument to London's prodigality and folly, but I 
understand they are now forbidden because of 
the plague. I like the policy well if it hold, for 
a disease is but lodged or patched up, that it 
not cured in the cause and the cause of plagues 
is sin — and the cause of sin are plays — therefore, 
the cause of plagues are plays." 

Toward the close of Shakespeare's stay in Lon- 
don he purchased a house in the vicinity of 
Blackfriars, which was the only London prop- 
erty it is known for certain he ever owned, al- 
though his comparatively early and easy rise to 
affluence leads to the assumption that he must 
quickly have become a shareholder in the theatre. 

There seems to be in the heart of nearly every- 
one a natural love or fondness for whatever was 
done in the reign of Elizabeth. It was a golden 
age — a time when England first began to feel 
her greatness. Everything had flourished in 
England when Shakespeare was young, but the 
blossoming period had been" short and at the 
dawn of 1600, the national mood had changed 
and Shakespeare's with it. 

Samuel Johnson once remarked that when a: 
man is tired of London he is tired of life, for 
said he "there is in London all that life can af- 
ford." We have ample evidence that when he 
left London Shakespeare was tired of life. 

Frank Harrison in his book "Shakespeare, the 
Man,'' says: 

"The truth is that the passions of jealousy and 
rage which are the history of Shakespeare's life, 
after meeting Man- Fitten, at length wore our 
his strength and he crept home to Stratford to 
die." 

The picture of another writer, George 
Brandes, is equally sombre, though painted in 
words more pleasing to the ear: 

"The time arrived when mirth and even the 
joy of life are extinguished in Shakespeare's soul. 
Heavy clouds massed themselves on his mental 
horizon — their nature we can only divine, and 
gnawing sorrows and disappointments beset 
him." 

The great city in which he had spent the bet- 
ter part of his life-time had not so succeeded 
in attaching him to it that he felt any pain in 
(Continued on Page 17) 



Page 12 



The CLUBWOMAN 



•Bo^-atreeifG^ ^^em 



■iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



A TOAST 
To the Three Hundred and Sixty-Second Birth- 
day of William Shakespeare 
The genus of good fellowship 
Lurks in this brew — Come have a sip 
Come fill the glass, and drink to him 
Whose pathos makes our eyes grow dim, 
Whose sadness makes our hearts grow sad, 
Whose gladnesses make all hearts glad. 

Come — Drink to him whose beauteous grace 

Defies all time, expands all space. 

And makes of sorrows mystery 

A towering strength of our today. 

Of fairy lore ■we have a touch, 

Of Love lore not a whit too much 

Nor of his dreams shall we be blind 

When this sweet day is left behind. 

Shakespeare — the poet of the world 

Is ours to toast — let's stand and drink. 

To him, and to his broad art 
And to the past that link by link 
Has kept the fires of his art 
Warm in our souls, ours is the part 
To wish his soul a sweet repose 

Safe in the care of One who knows — . 

* * » 

We hope you've had a merry time 
And pray you mercy — on our rhyme. 

Emma B. Keepers. 



To Mr. Frederick Warde: 

A modest tribute to one who has the genius 
to make human anything he attempts. 

For eight years Frederick Warde has faithfully 
brought to The Ebell Club — in honor of the 
birthday of Shakespeare — precious jewels from 
the poet's work and shyly laid them at our feet, 
and we being mortal have taken them — and bet- 
ter still ; we have grown in the taking. This 
annual recognition has become a custom in Ebell 
Club life of vital importance ; and with Mr. 
Warde guiding its artistic destinies it is an eager- 
ly awaited event. Our school children know 
their Shakespeare better because of Mr. Warde 's 
faithfulness to the cause of beauty. And when 
the children's children in future years shall con- 
tinue in love for the works of Shakespeare — let 
• us pray they will remember, too — THE ART- 
IST — Frederick Warde — who builded better 
than he perhaps knew. 

Reverence is a lovely thing — and we who 
stand reverent in the presence of genius, are wise. 



Like Mercy — "It blesses him who gives, and 
him who takes." — " 'Tis mightiest of the 
mighty." Out of his infinite variety Mr. Warde 
has this year consented to don Cap and Gown — 
and in succession, as they appear, he will with 
his inimitable resourcefulness, introduce each of 
sixteen Women of Shakespeare. She will in her 
time play her part — till all these vivid women 
shall have passed on. 

Constance — Lady Macbeth. Katherine — (In 
Taming of the Shrew) Katherine (of Aragon) 
— Juliet — Portia — Ophelia — Isabel — Portia (in 
Julius Caesar) Viola (in Twelfth Night) Her- 
mione — Puck — Desdemona — Katherine and 
Alice (in Henry the Fifth) Rosalind and Celia. 
Mrs. Page and Mrs. Ford — in Merry Wives of 
Windsor. Then our beloved Mrs. Read will 
take the hostess-ship into her hands and after a 
Shakespeare hymn is sung the evening will be- 
come a social event — and one more year wiir 
have passed to become a part of the ages. 



A MESSAGE FROM THE ART AND 

TRAVEL DEPARTMENT OF THE 

LOS ANGELES EBELL 

A young friend recently informed us that he 
was studying Commercial Art, and he advised 
us to look over the advertising portion of the 
leading magazines, if we wished to know how 
great a field he had chosen for his artistic tal- 
ents. We did so, and agreed with him that 
never had art and commerce been so linked. 
Lovely maidens with a background of purple 
sea, lying on the sands, displaying Somebody's ' 
Never Fade Bathing Suits. Dainty ladies in for- 
est, glades swinging in hammocks, revealing the 
lure of full-finish, all-silk hose. Rolling green 
golf links, a cozy country club in the distance and 
a smiling caddy strolling by proclaiming the 
merits of the golf clubs he carries. This was cer- 
tainly art — of a sort — and a proof that the 20th 
Century has a taste for the beautiful. But we 
recoiled from the expression "Commercial Art" 
with a capital "A". Real Art is begotten by In- 
spiration' and mothered by Leisure, and becomes 
the reward, not of Commerce but of Culture. 
Our brisk young friend telling us triumphantly ■ 
of the prices paid to their artists by certain ad- 
vertising firms, did not remind us of the earnest 
London are realized the intenser life or broader 
men with dreams in their eyes who worked in 
their shabby studios, not for gain but for the very 
joy of creating. Some of them were faddists; 
some painted jazz in colors; some flung their 



APRIL, 1926 



Page 13 



whole palette into the canvas and puzzled us to 
find the meaning ; some looked at Nature and 
reflected her for our joy — but all of them sought 
their ideal of beaut}" with whole-souled devotion. 
Art was its own reward to them ; and the living 
was only incidental. 

Any land must count its age in centuries be- 
fore it possesses an art atmosphere. Pioneers are 
intent on the necessities of life. Wood to build 
houses and to burn ; roads for transportation ; 
forests to be ruthlessly cleared that food may be 
produced on the land ; toil-bowed backs too wearj' 
to be straightened that the eyes may rejoice in 
the m^re beauty of the world — these are the pre- 
occupations of those who conquer the wilderness. 
It is only when wealth and leisure have been ac- 
quired that they think of ornamentation. Cali- 
fornians never cease to wonder at the artistic 
instincts of the priests who with mud and In- 
dians, fashioned the simple dignity of the Mis- 
sions, but those men were bred in old lands 
\vhich had inspired them, and familiarized them 
with the beauty of simplicity. But the Ameri- 
can pioneers came here fresh from the struggle 
with prairie, mountain and Nature's harshness, 
and they brought no art with them. It re- 
mained for generations which followed to em- 
bellish the foundations they laid. 

The child born in an Italian citv open his 
e\-es in an atmosphere of Art. The shadow of 
great statues falls upon his perambulator; his 
parents carry him on half-holidays through gal- 
leries containing the world's masterpieces. He 
imbibes right tastes with the air he breathes. But 
a California infant looks first and oftenest at 
billboard pictures with mis-spelled legends under 
them, and he usually lives in a brand new subdi- 
vision, on which noble old trees have been sac- 
rifices to make rooms for tawdry bungalows over- 
weighted with ornament and tortured into fan- 
tastic originality. Some day when he conquers 
fortune and learns his own limitations of taste 
he can employ one of our fine band of architects 
to build him a home upon a hill slope which will 
be a joy to every passer by. But conquerors are 
few and the great majority must look for the 
elevation of artistic standards to our public mu- 
seums and to our Women's Clubs. Nothing so 
establishes one's faith in the artistic future of 
Los Angeles as a Sunday afternoon visit to Ex- 
position Park. The large number of children 
who wander, wide-eyed, through the picture gal- 
leries, are imbibing unconsciously a love of art, 
and some day when they join the ranks of Coun- 
cilmen. Supervisors and Zoning Commissioners 
this love will be reflected in the city's beauty. 
Speed the day! 

The Art and Travel Department of the Ebell 
Club is composed of a group of women who love 
the beautiful in every form. Long journeys 




Franklina Gray Bartlett. 
Curator of the Art and Travel Department, 
Ebell Club of Los Angeles. 

through historic lands, across the seas, have lead 
many of them to realize that knowledge begets a 
thirst for knowing more. Out of the riches of 
their experience they bring reminiscences which 
delight the stay-at-homes. Others are students 
of art who have both practical and theoretical 
experience. This year they have had a monthly 
review of the notable exhibits which are being 
held in the city, so that they may visit them with 
interest. Discussions of the civic improvements 
in course of construction have stimulated a de- 
sire for a City Beautiful. Architecture, painting, 
prints, etchings and travel have formed the sub- 
jects of the study. In the closing meeting in 
!\Ia\' it is proposed to consider Gardens and 
Parks. 

The often-quoted saying, "What you don't 
know, can't hurt you," is only true in a limited 
sense. It might be paraphrased, "What you 
don't know can't interest you." A mind must 
be trained to see the beauties of land and sea and 
sky before it can delight in the artist's skill in 



Page 14 



The CLUBWOMAN 



depicting them. Eyes which see not and ears 
which hear not, are the result of ignorance. 
Thus the object of all art study is to 
"Scatter diligently in susceptible minds 
The grains of the good and the beautiful. 
They will develop there to trees — bud, bloom 
And bear the golden fruits of Paradise." 



PSYCHOLOGY OF DRESS 
By Pauline Rice Shields 

The very first dress that Eve wore had its 
origin in the tailor bird in the Garden of Eden. 
This bird with its sharp bill pierced the leaves 
and joined them to line its nest, which gave Eve 
the idea of a fig leaf dress. From this we come 
to the garments made to cover the genital or- 
gans, which covering made of bark, in strips 
patched and dyed, forms the costume of the 
South Sea Islanders. 

Carlyle says in Sartor Resartus "among wild 
people, we find tattooing and painting prior to 
clothes." The first spiritual want of a bar- 
barous man, is decoration, as we still see among 
the barbarous classes in civilization. 

The aboriginal savage for decoration must 
have clothes. Havelock Ellis says in the "Evo- 
lution of Modesty," fashion in the more civilized 
countries can easily inhibit anatomical modesty, 
and rapidly exhibit in turn almost any portion 
of the body." 

In Moana, a moving picture, tattooing takes 
on a new meaning in the South Sea Islands when 
a boy reaching manhood, has to undergo the op- 
eration of being tattooed before marriage. The 
semi-nude body does not embarrass the spectators, 
for it is their standard of dress and morality, 
neither does the audience see any thing but dig- 
nity and modesty in such surroundings. Even in 
the dance, the male did not touch the girl of his 
desire, though anointed by her with sweet smell- 
ing unguents, and he was subject much more 
to temptation, than the present day youth. 

Mr. Ruskin has raised the question as to the 
propriety of girls being wooed and won in the 
gay world, where, in a miserable confusion of 
candle light, moon-light and any thing but day 
light, in indecently attractive and insanely ex- 
pensive dresses, in snatched moments, in hidden 
corners in accidental impulses and dismal ignor- 
ances, young people smirk and ogle, whisper, 
sneak and stumble, flutter and fumble and blun- 
der into what they call love. Talk to moralists 
they will find you all the reasons in a breath, 
why young men do not get married. Silks, dia- 
monds, frisettes, gloves, shawls, kilt plaiting, 
lace, milliner's polonaises, queus or trains, shoes, 
velvets, the money ^vomen spend on dress, be- 
cause they are felt to be in keeping with the spirit 



of the times, to which their eye and taste have 
been trained. 

When goodness, purity and virtue are painted 
on canvas, they are made lovely, when we find 
these virtues going about on earth, slatternly 
dowdy, we get a shock. In 1883 it was said, ;i 
gown is a part of the woman, an expression of 
her nature, character, instincts, friends. Herrick 
wrote, "when as in silks, my Julia goes, then, 
then, methinks how sweetly flows, that liquefac- 
tion of her clothes." A man is apt to remember 
the woman he loves in a particular dress. 
Danta said of Beatrice, she appeared clothed in 
noble color, a becoming and modest crimson. 
Petrarch remembered his Laura in a gown of 
green with violets. Chateaubriand in calling up 
his happy moments wrote, "when I first saw 
Madame Recamier, she wore a white gown and 
was sitting on a blue sofa." The woman who 
sets herself squarely against the fashion and 
clothes herself in opposition to its dictates, is 
sure to prove, first, a laughing stock, then a 
failure. She is really in opposition to the spirit 
of her day, often a nice thing in creed or re- 
former, but never nice in a dress. What we see 
habiti^ally we get to like and desire to imitate. 
Dr. Johnson: "A Brussels trimming is like bread 
sauce, it takes away the glow of color from the 
gown and gives you nothing instead of it, but 
sauce was invented to heighten the flavor of our 
food and trimming is an ornament to the man- 
teau or it is nothing." One of the reasons there 
is a decline in fervid and single hearted devotion 
may be, that men's eyes are bewildered and their 
perceptions confused by the infinite and subtle 
variety of feminine resource in dress. A woman 
should not suggest too many bureau drawers. 
What, says Berin, can be more becoming than 
the prevailing dress of our female servants, the 
well fitting cotton dress, the snowy apron, the 
round cap below which, appears the knot of 
glossy well kept hair, the close short sleeve, the 
white stocking The female domestics of good 
houses have hit a happy mean in dress and have 
succeeded in combining the elegant and modest." 
This was in 1863. What would Berin say of 
the present day servant and the effect of the first 
pair of silk stockings, which has a peculiar psy- 
chology all its own? Before, when the touch of 
the silk had not been hers but only of the lisle 
or cotton, the servant was content, but once let 
her wear the silk, tho it be but a cast off pair 
belonging to her employer which was found in 
the waste basket, never again will she go back to 
the kind she formerly was satisfied to wear. Part 
of the recreation of the wage earner are clothes. 
Some one asked a chorus girl what was the 
most disturbing factor in her stage life, meaning 
morals. The girl answered, "A Jacob's ladder 
in a new pair of silk stockings." 



APRIL, 1926 



Page 15 



There was a law regulating dress called the 
Tudor Sumptuary Law of Henry 8th. lasting 
from 1510-1597, but fashion was stronger than 
law and law for regulating dress disappeared in 
1604. Does a well dressed person stand a better 
chance to advance in the world and does a cer- 
tain kind of dress give to the person wearing it, 
a certain personality, clothing his or her con- 
sciousness with the starvation or wealth, the rich- 
ness or poorness of the texture or a feeling of 
being improperly prepared for the struggle of 
succeeding in a life-work, by lack of proper garb, 
which might give the self possession of being 
able to cope with any thing or the lack of it a 
feeling that he or she could not be a part of 
that radiation of prosperity, which certain tex- 
tures and good clothes seem to bring forth ? Mr. 
John Shuff, a prominent, successful insurance 
writer is quoted as saying, "that being well 
dressed has its business value, as others are prone 
to judge by external appearances." The psycho- 
logical effect of good clothes on the wearer is 
varied. A man can actually increase or decrease 
his mental and moral powers by the way he 
dresses. When a man looks successful, he finds 
it easy to feel and act successful and when he 
feels shabby his ability to deal successfully with 
other men and women takes a decided drop. 
One salesman told me, that if he were poorly 
dressed, he shrank from facing other people. 



There are exceptions to this in my mind, in a 
genius, for instance, like Mr. Edison, whose coat 
had to be pinned together, to make him pre- 
sentable, to go to a banquet in a hurry. Clothes 
did not bother him. But of course he is al- 
ways Mr. Edison. Go to the Public Library 
any day and see the men poring over books; 
many have torn, shabby coats out of the sleeves 
and one wonders, are these men really poor or 
have they lost their self-respect? Footgear some 
times exercise great power over the wearers 
thoughts and affections. Nothing delights young- 
sters like new boots. Hans Christian Anderson 
gave an account of new red shoes worn at his 
confirmation, how they absorbed his attention 
and he fancied, the eyes of the whole congrega- 
tion were on them. In New York, there used 
to be a philanthropic institution for the redemp- 
tion of human derelicts. The attempt was made 
to give them moral stamina by exceedingly prac- 
tical measures. A cobbler was hired to put good 
heels on the shoes of these unfortunates. The 
theory was that if their heels were mended they 
would stand straighter, physically than they had 
done before with the improvement in posture 
brought about by this simple device, there would 
be a gain in moral strength. The actual results 
vindicated this theory. The men whose heels 
were repaired showed greater readiness to re- 
(Continued on Page 34) 



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SEVENTH FLOOR 




Page 16 



The CLUBWOMAN 



THE WOMEN'S UNIVERSITY CLUB 

By Iva B. Duer 



The first meeting in February marked the sec- 
ond anniversary of the occupancy of the club 
house, 943 South Hoover. The meeting was 
given over to mock graduation exercises in honor 
of the life members. Mrs. Birney Donnell pre- 
sided as class president. Mrs. Roger Sterrett 
gave the class history, Mrs. Adele Humphrey, 
the class poem and Mrs. Nellie F. Cook, the 
class will. Mrs. Dorothea Moore read some of 
her favorite selections from her book, "Selvage." 
It is a volume of epigrams, poems and stories. 
Mrs. Sarah Bixby Smith also read from her book 
titled " 'Dobe Days." Mrs. Chester Ashley de- 
livered the baccalaureate address. Ilya Bronson 
of the Philharmonic Orchestra rendered a group 
of 'cello solos. He was accompanied at the piano 
by his little daughter. 

The quota of one hundred and fifty life mem- 
bers has been filled. It is planned to set aside 
the first meeting of February each year in cele- 
bration of the life membership. 

The club had the privilege of hearing two 
brilliant and popular speakers during March. 
Dr. Charles F. Aked spoke at the Saturday 
luncheon on the subject of Prophets of the 
Dawn ; a background of histor)' for the study 
of Russia in revolution. He has just returned 
from an eastern lecture tour in which this lec- 
ture was included. Dr. Robert Freeman was a 
dinner speaker Thursday, March 11th. He spoke 
on "The New Note in Religion." Dr. Freeman 
is considered one of the foremost speakers in the 
United States. 

The Sunday Afternoon Teas, the last Sun- 
day of each month, have proved rare treats. The 
intimacy of the home^ atmosphere has brought 
these artists into the inner circle and they have 
given to us accordingly. 

No one who heard Tilda Rohr on that Sun- 
day afternoon when the pouring rain kept many 
away, will ever forget the exquisite sweetness of 
the songs and the singer. Dressed in a native 
peasant costume, she featured the Swiss yodeling 
songs and the songs of the people. The follow- 
ing was the program scheduled, but it was inter- 
spersed with many encores : 
Progr.am 

The Old Refrain ..Kreisler 

Farewell Folksong 



Bergorette Weckerlin 

On the Hill Folksong 

Sleep, Babv - Handlev 

Cattle Call ■ Von der Weid 

From Lucern to Weggis Folksong 

The Lover's Quarrel Tilda Rohr 

The Mary Christine Albine Trio gave the pro- 
gram in February. The members of this trio 
are Mary Christine Albine, piano ; Evelyn Pick- 
erell, violin; Hazel Babbidge, 'cello. They are 
one of the most popular groups in Los Angeles. 
At the March Tea, Homer Simmons was the 
artist. His program favored American music. 
Program 

To the Sea MacDowell 

From a Wandering Iceberg MacDowell 

The Lake at Evening .". Griffes 

Scherzo Griflfes 

Little Dancer Carpenter 

Little Indian '. ..Carpenter 

Etude, D flat major Liszt 

The Tuesday luncheons are increasingly popu- 
lar. In February, Miss Agnes Fallen, author 
;bf stories of the foreign colonies of Los Angeles, 
was the program speaker. Her subject was "The 
Foreign-born Woman and Her Problems in 
America." In March, Miss Ethel Eaton, of the 
Ethel Eaton Studios in the Brack Shops, gave a, 
lesson on the importance of color and line in 
dress. The models for this lesson were chosen 
from the club meritbers. They were chosen as 
representatives of unusual figures, heights and 
coloring. 

The Literature Section counts itself fortunate 
in having Leslie Connor Williams as its leader. 
The discussion this month was upon Jacob Was- 
serman's "Faber and the Lost Years." 

The awards have been made for the best plays. 
Miss Agnes Peterson, vice-principal of the Gar- 
dena High School, won the first prize; Mrs. 
Roger Sterrett the second. Dr. Allison Gaw, 
Mrs. Margaret Gillette and Edwin Schallert 
were the judges. 

The Drama Section is planning the produc- 
tion of these plays for the May meeting. Miss 
Peterson's plaj' is in blank verse. It is a trag- 
edy with a Chinese setting, being based upon a 
Chinese legend. Mrs. Sterrett's play is a 
comedy. It is titled "A Self-made Cinderella." 



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WOMAN'S CLUB OF HOLLY- 
WOOD 

(Continued from Page 11) 

leaving it ; there was neither man nor woman 
there so dear to him as to make their society 
preferable to solitude, or the crowded life of Lon- 
don to the seclusion of Stratford. 

One cannot feel that Shakespeare ever loved 
London or realized the intenser life or broader 
vision that were his because of London. He 
never wrote in praise or love of it, and from 
his epitaph, presupposing he really wrote it, one 
might almost imagine he feared his body might 
be taken there and that he ^\-rote same to for- 
stall any such move on the part of his friends 
and admirers. 

It is by his gift as a playwright that Shakes- 
f)eare holds his world-wide fame, but his appeal 
to his countr\'-men is deeper than this and closer. 
He speaks to them in a language rich in associa- 
tions with their daily life and their daily habits 
of thought. The English nation loved him best, 
not for his greatness, but for his humanit\' and 
while he still lived they invented for him a name 
which can never be bettered — the name of "gen- 
tle Shakespeare." 

"He was not of an age but for all time." 



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The CLUBWOMAN 



HIGHLAND PARK EBELL 
CLUB 

By Mrs. George F. Cook 

As a celebration of Luther Burbank's birth- 
day, a conservation program was arranged for 
March 9 by Mrs. Harriet W. Myers, a past 
president of Highland Park Ebell Club, author 
of several books on birds, and who was for eight 
years General Federation chairman of Birds and 
Flowers, first state chairman of Birds and Wild 
Life and now is Conservation chairman of San 
Joaquin district. Mrs. Myers gave an instruc- 
tive lecture on birds illustrated with beautiful 
slides and also introduced Mr. George Barnes, 
president of American Reforestation Association 
who gave an earnest address on "Reforestation 
in Relation to Bird Life." Appropriate songs 
were well rendered by Mrs. D. J. Matchett, 
accompanied by Ruth Towne Smith. Mrs. 
Matchett sang "My Wind Harp" the beautiful 
\vords of which were written by Dessa H. M. 
Fultz and the equally beautiful music by Ruth 
Towne Smith.- She also sang "I Hear a Thrush 
at Eve", Cadman, and "The Pine", (a tragedy) 
Woodman. 

One of the delightful musical programs of 
the month was given by Miss Leontine Redon, 
soprano, and Mrs. Guy Bush, pianist and accom- 
panist. 

On Public Affairs Day, after club singing 
with Mrs. J. E. Gribble as leader and Mrs. 
Loye Holmes Miller at the piano, Mr. Theo- 
dore Payne gave a timely talk on "Making a 
Spring Garden." An address full of information 



was given by Mr. Burdett Moody, president of 
the Boulder Etem Association, on "The Boulder 
Dam Project and the All-American Canal." 

A lecture of unusual interest during the month 
was given by Mr. Blythe Webster of St. An- 
drew's University, Edinburgh, on "Kipling, Rec- 
tor of St. Andrew's University." Preceding this 
lecture, Mrs. L. C. Hall sang several pleasing 
soprano selections, accompanied at the piano by 
Mrs. George B. Mier. 

A recital by the Apollo Male Quartette was 
the attraction at a reciprocity tea on March 30 
at 2 o'clock. 

Of special interest has been the art exhibit 
throughout February and March by West Coast 
Art Club women painters, through the courtesy 
of the art chairman, Mrs. William L. Judson. 

Heading the section work for March was the 
Literature Section following the monthly lunch- 
eon. Mrs. Charles Oden, one of Ebell's charm- 
ing singers, was chairman of the committee that 
prepared a tastefully arranged luncheon with 
the St. Patrick motif. The curator of the sec- 
tion, Mrs. Dan Hammack, introduced the 
speaker, Mrs. Allison Gaw, wife of Prof. Gaw 
of the English department of University of 
Southern California, editor of the Lyric West, 
president of the Verse Writers' Club and co- 
author with her husband of the drama, 
"Pharaoh's Daughter." Mrs. Gaw's subject was 
"Poetry in a Mechanical Age." 

Mrs. Clarence Shults, curator of American 
Citizenship led a lively discussion on "The 
School System of California." Mrs. M. D. 
Howard, curator of the Bible Section introduced 



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APRIL, 1926 



Page 19 



the leader, Miss Winifred Rouzee, who reviewed 
Chronicles I and II. 

On March 16 at 1 o'clock after soprano se- 
lections by Mrs. Charles Oden with Ruth 
Towne Smith at the piano, a one-act comedy 
"Hearts of Ice" written by Mrs. George F. 
Cook, press chairman of the club, directed by 
Mrs. R. W. Snell, curator of the Drama Section 
and played by fourteen members of the section 
was presented by the Drama Section in the club 
auditorium and was favorably received. The 
story depicts the reluctance with which the 
Brookfield Culturb Club welcomes a mysterious 
celebrity. Members of the cast are as follows : 
Susan Wiggins, the maid — Mrs. William P. 
Dunlap; Miss Mary Andrews, saleslady — Mrs. 
L. Maude Symonds; Mrs. Margaret Bennett, 
hostess — Mrs. K. Daniel; Mrs. Gerald Mon- 
tague, president of the club — Mrs. Harriet W. 
Myers ; members of the Brookfield Culture Club 
— -Mrs. Charles Oden, Mrs. Roscoe King, Mrs. 
Jessie B. Knight, Mrs. Emma Sens, Mrs. Paul 
Franklin, Mrs. Herbert C. Owens, Mrs. Harry 
E. Lawrence, Mrs. Nellie K. Russell and Mrs. 
Madison L. Goflf. 

On the same day at 2:30 p. m., the Rambler 
Section made their annual Easter visit to the 
Southern California Home for Aged Women. 
On March 10 members of this section took a 
vigorous walk to Switzer's Camp. Another 




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"Nowadays in San Diego, It's the Maryland" 



pleasant day was March 24 when this same 
group enjoyed a day at Pacific Palisades as the 
guests of Mrs. N. W. Tupper. Mrs. Samuel 
Weston Hastings and Mrs. E. B. Machin are 
the untiring leaders of the section. 

Program Music was the subject of Mrs. 
Harry E. Fisher, curator, before the Music Sec- 
tion. Committees and Their Reports was the sub- 
ject discussed in Parliamentary Law Section bv 
Mrs. Charles S. McKelvey, Mrs. I. F. Dill- 
man, curator, and the "Comedy of Errors" was 
read at the Shakespeare Section of which Mrs. 
C. W. Foote and Mrs. Lois B. Knowlton are 
curators. 



WEDNESDAY MORNING CLUB 

By Pauline E. Olson, Press Chairman 
March! a month of blustering winds, melting 
snows, very disagreeable but with just a hint of 
spring; — such is the picture we conjure up, those 
of us who have lived in the East but in Califor- 
nia — March — warm, languid days, gentle 
breezes, glorious sunshine ; maybe a shower or 
two ; birds singing, — green, green every where 
with here and there a dash of gold or purple — 
who can tell when winter ends, spring comes in 
and summer begins? March is also a sort of 
interlude in the busy world, the Lenten spirit 
of quiet and rest is felt in club life. 

The first event of the month occurred on 




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The CLUBWOMAN 



March 2 when Mrs. John Hokom, third vice 
president, entertained the executive board at her 
home with a lovely luncheon after which the 
regular business meeting took place. 

On March 2, members were entertained on 
the afternoon program of the Drama .Section of 
the West Ebell Club, who presented two one-act 
plays. These were cleverly done and were greatly 
enjoyed by a large, appreciative audience. 

Members of the Shakespeare Alumnae, of 
which Mrs. Lillian Latham is president, were 
entertained on March 12 at the home of Mrs. 
J. H. Hale in Ocean Park. 

March 17 was "Reciprocity Day" and the big 
day of the month. Officers of the district board 
and club presidents were our guests for the day. 
During the lunch, Mrs. Harold W. Baily, our 
president, introduced the district officers, visiting 
club presidents and representatives ; they in turn 
spoke a word of greeting. Mrs. Baily called 
upon our junior past president, Mrs. S. B. Wel- 
come and later introduced the executive board 
and directors. The program for the afternoon 



was presented by the Music, Shakespeare and 
Drama sections of the club. 

On March 24 we had the pleasure of hearing 
Miss Lloy Galpin lecture on "International Re- 
lations." Miss Galpin is a member of the Los 
Angeles High School faculty, a very brilliant lec- 
turer and one feels it a privilege to hear her. 

The last Wednesday in the month is always 
our open meeting day and every one is invited" 
to bring guests. The program for the day was 
presented by the Hollenbeck Ebell Club, which 
consisted of a California play and was greatly 
enjoyed by .every one. 

The Music Section, under the instruction of 
Professor Ralph R. Laughlin, has started work 
on a new cantata, "Three Springs" by Paul Bliss. 
The music of this is very beautiful and will be 
ready for presentation in May. The Drama Sec- 
tion has secured the ser\'ices of Mrs. Julia Bar- 
ber as instructor. Mrs. Barber was formerly 
with the English department of the Los An- 
geles City Schools and has had a wide dramatic 
experience. 



PASADENA SHAKESPEARE CLUB 

By Mrs. Harry Coleman, Press Chairman 



Starting the every-member canvass towards 
the goal of $50,000 to apply on the new club- 
house debt, the Shakespeare Club of Pasadena 
gave a St. Patrick's Day luncheon to its mem- 
bers March 11. Under the chairmanship of 
Mrs. E. B. Russell the occasion was one of fun 
and clever stunts as well as an introduction to 
the every-member campaign which is o be led 
by Mrs. E. M. Stanton and her corps of cap- 
tains. The luncheon was served by colleen 
w^aitresses who came marching to the lilting 
strains of the campaign song composed by Mrs. 
J. P. O'Mara. 

"It isn't very funny when you haven't any 
money," they sang as they wound in and out 
among the tables. It wasn't a hint but the mem- 
bers laughed and took it just the same and re- 
plied in tips to over $100. There was a jazz 
orchestra and confetti and green candles set in 
gorgeous cabbages and bouquets of ferns set in 
potato holders and horns and other noise makers 
galore. Green balloons floated over the tables 
and vines and Irish flags decorated the bal- 
conies. Three pupils of Miss Anna Gray danced 
the Irish jigs in the program which followed 
the luncheon. Mrs. C. C. Snyder was an Irish 
policeman who made love to a s^veetheart, Mrs. 
Grace Sayre in a duet "Och the Dear Little 
Girl." Mrs. George Stanley played Irish melo- 
dies on her piano accordion and Miss Lucy 
Chamberlain and Mrs. Snyder gave a duet. 
Mrs. Cecil Bryan and Mrs. J. W. Moran were 
pages who announced the "voices from the past." 



Queen Victoria (Mrs. C. E. Ashcroft), Susan 
B. Anthony (Mrs. George Daniells), Rip Van 
Winkle (Mrs. A. J.Wingard), William Shake- 
speare (Ethel Bruton), Nero (Mrs. Philip 
Stone), and St. Patrick (Mrs. Charles Rodi), 
all appeared in authentic costumes and in a few 
well chosen words gave incontrovertible reasons 
why the Shakespeare Club should pay its just 
building debt. There was a slight dispute be- 
tween Shakespeare and St. Patrick as which 
should remain seated on the stage. 

"It's my day," said St. Patrick. 

"It's my club," said Shakespeare. 
Irish speeches spoken with a view of further- 
ing the campaign were wittily given by Mrs. 
Clayton R. Taylor, Mrs. McClellan Reed, Mrs. 
E. M. Stanton, Mrs. J. P. O'Mara and the pres- 
ident of the club, Mrs. Edwin F. Hahn. 



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APRIL, 1926 



Page 21 



Five hundred and fifn-four members were 
present. 

The members of Mrs. Stanton's committee 
are at work in a house to house canvass of club 
members and it is confidenth" expected that the 
desired $50,000 will be raised by April Isi 
to apply on the building debt of $90,000. 

A task which has just been happily accom- 
plished by the committee, Mrs. C. E. Ashcroft, 
Mrs. E. H. Locbwood and Miss Anna Meeker, 
has been the revision of the club by-laws. The 
draft vfBS read on February 24 and adopted with 
' some minor changes on March 2. The chief 
change in the by-laws is that the new executive 
consists of one board of directors instead of two 
boards as formerly. There are to be four vice- 
presidents who shall be chairmen of program, 
public affairs, membership and curator of depart- 
ments. OfEcership is limited to a two-year term 
with the exception of treasurer. 

The prize play, "Uncle Sam's Workshop", 
written by Louise Taylor Gerdine, district 
Drama chairman, was again produced March 12 
at the evening session of the state conference 
of the Daughters of the American Revolution in 
Los Angeles as an offering of Pasadena chapter 
of which Mrs. Gerdine is a member. Mrs. Ger- 
dine is a member also of the Shakespeare club. 

]\Irs. J. H. Jones ^vho is histon' and land- 
marks chairman of the Shakespeare Club with 
her committee. Mrs. George Daniells and Miss 
Lucy Chamberlain, put on a ver>' interesting 
program for the Illinois society recently. Miss 
Chamberlain spoke on the days of '49 and ]\Irs. 
Daniells on the Iron Horse. Both ladies were 
in costume of the period. ^Irs. Jones presided 
in two capacities as historical chairman and as 
an old Illinoisan. 



GALPIN SHAKESPEARE CLUB 

By Mrs. Elizabeth C. Fisher, Press Chairman 

On Wednesday, March 10, at the Women's 
University Club, the Galpin Shakespeare Club 
held its regular monthh' meeting. 

After the president, Mrs. Harry Bender, had 



called the meeting to order, she announced that 
Mrs. W. E. Silverwood had consented to give 
the program. 

The club is working this year on the corre- 
spondences and contrasts between the literature 
of Shakespeare's time and that of our own, and 
Mrs. Silvenvood had chosen as the subject of the 
morning the modern and the older treatment of 
death. 

She read the dreadful little monologue called 
"Before Breakfast" by Eugene O'Neill, and also 
Mr. Frayne Williams' fantasy "The Blue Vase", 
and balanced these with the death scene of An- 
tony from "Antony and Cleopatra" coming back 
to one of the earlier plaj's in the modern style 
bv giving "The Death of Ase" from Ibsen's 
"Peer Gynt." 

Vocal music for the occasion was furnished by 
Mrs. Cora Thorne Bird, accompanied by Miss 
Doris Chadney. 

Before adjournment the club was addressed 
by Mrs. Craigie, a former state chairman of the 
Federation of Shakespeare Clubs, who urged the 
advantages of Federation. 



SOUTH SIDE EBELL CLUB 

By Edna Grace Cooke, Sub Press Chairman 

March has dealt especially well with the South 
Side Ebell Club in that, aside from its regular 
splendid programs, several notable events have 
transpired to make of March a month long to be 
remembered by club members. 

Notable among these events was the visit of 
Mrs. J. B. Lorbeer, district president, made to 
the club on March 25th. Mrs. Lorbeer ap- 
peared not only as speaker but as luncheon guest 
as well. WTiile South Side has always been a 
great admirer of ]Mrs. Lorbeer this visit and 
the wonderfully inspirational talk she gave, has 
endeared her to the club as never before. Shar- 
ing honors with the district president, was past 
president of South Side, Mrs. Warren J. 
Holden, in whose honor the affair was directlj' 
given. The dining room has never been more 



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Page 22 



The CLUBWOMAN 



beautifully decorated as Mrs. Carl Custer — 
luncheon chairman — had used as the motif of her 
decorative scheme spring in all her most beau- 
tiful and dainty shades. And taking a com- 
bination of illustrious guests, beautiful decora- 
tions, together with an exceptionally splendid 
luncheon, all conspired to make a gala affair of 
the event. 

All through the month speakers and assisting 
artists have more than lived up to expectations, 
a fact conducive to an added interest being mani- 
fest among lay members, and resulting in an ex- 
ceptionally good attendance. President Kate 
Thengam is responsible to a great extent for this 
added zest with which the members are respond- 
ing and much is expected to transpire in the near 
future to still further add to this new interest. 

The ways and means committee, under Lily 
Peterson, is still a very active and function- 
ing live wire bunch of women ; for within the 
month they have among themselves made up 
cedar chests full of beautiful linen, which they 
are to raffle off for the club's building fund, and 
to which fund they expect to add at least $500. 

Taking it all in all, March has been a more 
than satisfactory month and though much sor- 
row has visited the club, in that several of the 
prominent members have suffered losses of be- 
loved parents; yet all feel that "God's still on 
his throne, and all's well with the world." 



LOS ANGELES AUDUBON 
SOCIETY 

(Arbor Day Address by Mrs. Warren J. Holden on 
the occasion of hie dedicating of four flowering trees 
in the bird sanctuary, Vermont Canyon. The trees 
were named for Mrs. F. T Bicknell, Mrs. Robert Fargo, 
Mrs. Harriet Myers and Mrs. George H. Schneider, 
respecti'vely.) 

(Arbor Day Address by Mrs. Warren J. 
Holden on the occasion of the dedicating of four 
flowering trees in the bird sanctuary, Vermont 
Canyon. The trees were named for Mrs. F. T. 
Bicknell, Mrs. Robt. Fargo, Mrs. Harriet 
Myers, and Mrs. Geo. H. Schneider, respec- 
tively. ) 

We are about to dedicate these four beautiful 
flowering trees, named, as they are, for some of 
our beloved leaders and co-workers, to one of 
the great causes in which we as a society are 
especially interested, the conservation of wild 
life. 

Tree planting is recognized today as one of 
the crying needs of the hour. It is a duty each 
generation owes to posterity to plant trees, 
whether for fruit, shade, timber, beauty, or, as 
we are doing today, that they may become lodg- 
ing places for our feathered friends. 



Generations ago forests were very plentiful 
and wild life abundant. For centuries it was 
considered the duty of the government in some 
countries to clear land for farms and cities. Our 
own history abounds with stories of sturdy pio- 
neers whose sinews were bent to the clearing of 
land on which to make their homes and raise 
their crops. As population has increased the 
needs of civilization and commerce have depleted 
our forests almost unbelievably and yearly, ter- 
rible forest fires bring ruin to great regions and 
play havoc with the watersheds so essential to the 
welfare and prosperity of our people. Thus, 
ruthlessly, extravagantly, wastefully, our forests 
have been razed until the situation has become a 
serious menace to civilization, and brilliant minds 
are concerned more and more with schemes and 
projects of re-forestation. 

Sometime this will be done by our govern- 
ment as is already being done in many foreign 
lands. In Japan for the greater part of 250 
years it was a well understood and definite regu- 
lation that, whenever a tree was cut down for 
any purpose, two other trees should be planted 
to take its place ; and we hear that Japan is one 
of the most beautiful countries in the world, 
largely on account of its trees. 

In several of our own states tree planting 
has become a government enterprise. Nebraska 
started the ball rolling in 1872, instituting a 
tree-planting contest among her counties. Over 
12 million trees were planted that year, and 
since then more than 605 million trees have been 
set out in that state. This seems like an enorm- 
ous number, but is said to be only a drop in the 
bucket toward meeting the needs of future gen- 
erations, considering the rapidity with which 
forest products are being consumed. 

So we hope for a definite, practical and ade- 
quate program of tree planting to be promoted 
by our government. But until such a program ' 
be instituted, and even should one be instituted, 
it is, and always will be, the duty and privilege 
of every patriotic and beauty loving citizen to 
plant trees here and there, wherever practical. 
Every tree or shrub redounds to the comfort and 
welfare of man. 

Someone has said, "A tree is a deposit in the 
bank of nature which she repays a thousand 
fold." So, today, in planting these trees, I feel 
that we are in this measure fulfilling our civic , 
duty. Who can tell the far-reaching influence 
these very trees may have as they grow on from 
year to year here in this beautiful canyon? Can ' 
anyone visualize their part in the unfolding pan- 
orama of life? To those thousands who may 
come here looking unto the hills from whence 
cometh their help to find surcease from the trials - 
and tribulations of life, their bloom and beauty 
may give comfort and peace and a new' realiza- 



APRIL, 1926 



Page 23 



tion of God's love. If there is a sermon in 
stones, as the poet has said, there must be a won- 
derful sermon in a tree. 

"And he shall be like a tree planted by the 
river of waters," planted firmly in soil of Di- 
vine Life, watered by life-giving streams of Di- 
vine hove, and nurtured by the ever operative 
laws of Divine Truth. 

I hope these trees may mean all this and more 
to all who need healing and inspiration. You 
see I still put people first. We are interested in 
birds largely on account of their value and serv- 
ice to mankind. But we love the birds also for 
their own sake. We plant these trees hoping 
that they may be a resting place and home for 
cduntless thousands of winged songsters that will 
gladden this vale with their happy notes and 
calls. 

These are native trees as is fitting. Wild life 
includes also our native trees and shrubs. So it 
is my great pleasure to dedicate these trees to the 
conservation of wild life. 

He who plants a tree 

Plants a hope. 
(This is Mrs. Bicknell's tree) 
Canst thou prophesy, thou little tree. 
What the glory of thy boughs shall be? 

He who plants a tree 

He plants a joy. 
(This is Mrs. Fargo's tree) 
If thou couldst but know, thou happy tree, 
Of the bliss that shall inhabit thee. 

He who plants a tree 

He plants peace. 
(This is Mrs. Myers' tree) 
Never hast thou dreamed, thou blessed tree, 
Of the benediction thou shalt be. 

He who plants a tree 

He plants love. 
(This is Mrs. Schneider's tree) 
Heaven and earth helps him who plants a tree 
And his work its own reward shall be. 



WA-WAN CLUB 

March Luncheon, Biltmore Hotel, History and 

Landmarks Day. 
By Miss Firginia Calhoun, Chairman of the Day 

For Wa-Wan Club History and Landmarks 
are, considered as raw materials for creative 
genius, whereby the soul of our experiences are 
perpetuated, both of individuals and of the Na- 
tion. Not only because of this fact was the 
March function one of this club's most notable 
events during the year, but especially because 
,its honor guests and speakers were men and 
women foremost among Los Angeles' great con- 




'Ui feeling of 

dewy freshness 

Bathe your face in clean water 
and Mission Bell Soap, It will 
give you a gloriously refreshed 
and invigorated feeling. Make 
it a daily habit, and soon your 
skin will take on a new glow — 
new health and beauty. 

Cleanses Gently 

Its very thorough cleansing ef- 
fect is remarkable because it 
is so gentle, so easy. Give your 
skin the benefit of frequent 
baths in a cool fragrant lather 
of— 

Mission Bell Soap 




Los Angeles Soap Company 
Makers of White King 



Page 24 



The CLUBWOMAN 



servers and administrators of invaluable deposits 
of authentic record, "Lest we forget." 
: Among these were Charles F. Lummis whose 
original Landmark Club was the venerable pio- 
neer of all our present-day institutions of this 
sort, and Arthur S. Bent, Los Angeles Chamber 
of Commerce president, who has already opened 
a great door to a new era for that institution. 
Also there were those who have already availed 
themselves of the "treasure trove" American and 
are pioneers in the formation of American Art, 
according to their various planes of expression, 
having already produced immortal works. Also 
there were masterful interpreters of these their 
creations, and without whom they would remain 
as dead works. 

Among the speakers were Miss Grace 
Stoermer, state chairman of Historv and Land- 
marks of C. F. W. C, and Mrs. A. S. C. Forbes, 
district chairman of History and Landmarks, 
who told the legend of the California Meadow- 
lark. And there were the inimitable whistlers, 
Miss Jean Smally and Miss Helen Ward, of the 
Agnes Woodward Whistling School, the only 
school of its kind in the world, who demon- 
strated whistling as a fine art especially in their 
duet of Minnetonka by Lieur-ance, and the 
whistling solo, "Bubbles" by Friml and in their 
duet of Omaha Love-Call, their greeting to the 
club by its musical insignia. 

After their numbers it was easy to believe the 
story told by musicians, that in the Hungarian 
forests, birds in great choruses, sing almost to a 
complete finish, the well-known Liszt sym- 
phonies, but always stop short of completion, as 
if intending to throw out suggestions only for 
the ear that could hear. 

Dr. William Alanson Bryan spoke o fthe serv- 
ice of the museum to the arts — especially the Los 
Angeles Museum of which he is director. Dr. 
John A. Comstock, retiring director of South- 
west Museum, spoke of the valuable Grant Jack- 
son research library left that museum by the late 
Judge Grant Jackson. Dr. RoUand A. Vande- 
grift, chairman of the Southwest Museum Li- 
brary and Professor of Histon,' of the U. S. C, 
catalogued a list of outstanding epochs of our 
history as the treasure house for American com- 
posers and writers and thereby preserving our 
California inheritance. 

Mrs. Florencia Dodson de Schoneman, chair- 
man of History and Landmarks, spoke of Cali- 
fornia Spanish-colonial dancing — when danced, 
what danced, and how danced — the outstanding 
characteristic being modesty! This in both mo- 
tive and execution. Throwing the feet in air, 
thereby exposing small clothes above the waist 
line — this could not have happened in the days 
of the Spanish dons of California. 

Madam Matildita presented one of her ex- 



pert and lovely pupils, Senorita Pequita del Rey, 
in several entrancing Spanish dances, with Miss 
Nelly Ness at the piano. 

Miss Laura C. Cooley presented a phase of li- 
brary service to the arts entitled — "California 
Bookmarks Among Her Important Landnjarks," 
in behalf of Librarian Everett R. Perry and the 
Los Angeles Public Library. 

Madam Manuela V. Budrow, composer and 
concertist, heard for the first time in Los An- 
geles since her late return from Mexico and her 
thirty-thousand acre estates down there, again 
established her claim by the critics as "Califor- 
nia's Spanish Nightingale." 

Pasadena's brilliant pianist. Miss Olive Heiss, 
gave a masterful interpretation of Farvvell's 
"Dawn" — his international prize composition. 
This work was argument enough for Mr. Ar- 
thur Farwell in his talk on "The Relation of 
American Musical Folklore to a National Mu- 
sical Art." This American composer's long and 
distinguished career vitalized his valuable re- 
marks. He said in part, "By American musical 
folklore it must not be understood that there is 
but one American musical folklore. On the 
contrary there are many different sorts of mu- 
sical folklore in America — this is common knowl- 
edge. From all of these national folklore rec- 
ords — supposing they are, or might be preserved 
for us — together, they will all provide the cre- 
ative motive for an American national musical 
art with its distinctive characteristics. That is, 
if there is to be such a national musical art. 
The important and final element for such a cre- 
ation will depend upon the ability to get the 
original American music to the American people. 
And as long as this possibility depends upon the 
popularity of some composer, or some favorite 
interpreter, or upon the financial returns to some 
management, just so long there will never be a 
national American music — music must be given 
free to all throughout the countn,', if there is to 
be a national American musical art. 

Impressario L. E. Behymer addressed the club 
from his sick-bed by letter, in part as follows: 
"I wish it were possible for members of your or- 
ganization to realize the splendid opportunities 
which the State of California for one hundred 
and twenty-five years has given the creative 
genius of the allied arts in raw material to be- 
come producers of artistic things to hand down . 
to posterity. 

"The old Franciscan Mission in Santa Bar-, 
bara, alone, possesses more than one hundred 
compositions of the early period that extend to 
the delving composer material for hymns, chants, 
ballads, opera, and even instrumental numbers 
that can be given to the musical public of the 
present day in a form not only histrionic but 
pleasurable. 



APRIL, 1926 



Page 25 



"A week could be spent in the Southwest Mu- 
seum where suggestions could be obtained for 
every embellishment of the dress, the shoes the 
coiffure, in beautifying the home in a modern- 
ized form. There is so much of the old Span- 
ish and Mexican art that has entered into the 
home-life of Southern California, which can be 
used today in beautifying our surroundings, mak- 
ing home-life more comfortable and more pic- 
turesque, if the message could only be read, inter- 
preted and understood. 

"The same thing applies to the pictures of 
Remington, Diaz, the Russel brothers, and 
others who are conveying to us the stories of yes- 
terday, just the same as the many things that 
gave to Bret Harte, Jack London, Mark Twain, 
Inez Coulbrith, Ambrose Bierce, and Joaquin 
Miller, the foundation for their messages which 
have given us not only the picturesqueness of yes- 
terday, but the beauty of the home-life and the 
colorful surroundings of the fiestas, and the in- 
tercourse of the peoples of the past. 

"There is so much in the music, picturesque 
poetry, almost the legendary literature of the 
past century that we should study more and 
understand more fully the things of today. It is 
not only the Spanish architecture of this section 
that should appeal to us, but there are many 
things of the pioneers that should give us a far 
more stable value than we have at present, in the 



social, commercial and artistic structure of Cali- 
fornia." 

Wa-Wan Club's patriotism was manifest in 
the display of a large flag— our Stars and Stripes 
— and their enthusiastic reception of a delight- 
ful offering by "Tiny Baby" Jacqueline Sutor 
in her costumed impersonation of The Goddess 
of Liberty in Reverence for Our Flag, composed 
and arranged by her mother, Mrs. Mary B. 
Sutor, with piano prologue, Star-Spangled Ban- 
ner, Mrs. Bess D. Cornell at the piano. 

Baron von Pach-Winther spoke on Visual 
Education whose great opportunity is realized in 
screen productions, educational and entertaining 
for children and adults. 

In connection with this Mrs. William H. An- 
derson presented an entertaining and surprising 
paper on When George Washington Went to 
the Movies and What He Saw, with a large 
authentic crayon reproduction of the projecting 
mechanism used at that time in New York — 
1756. 

She said in part as follows: "It seems to be 
the fashion to announce some startling discovery 
in the personal records of George Washington. 
Many dreadful, unjust things have been said 
about him lately by lovers of wickedness, but up 
to this time, I do not know of his being accused 
of going to a moving picture show and taking 
his wife and her friends. But two items in his 



With 3C 

You can Overcome The 

Handicaps To Skin and Hair 

of the Hard Alkali Water in 

This Country. 

3C is the Modern, Conven- 
ient City Equivalent To 
Putting Out a Wash Tub To 
Catch Rain Water For a 
Shampoo. 



COMFORT 







Also Means 

CLEANLINESS 



You Can Buy 3C At These 

Places— 

LOS ANGELES 

A. & O. 

Broadway Department Store 

The May Co. 

HOLLYWOOD 

Carty Bros. 

FLINTRIDGE 

Flintridge Grocery Co. 

BEVERLY HILLS 

R. P. O'Connor 

PASADENA 

F. C. Nash Co. 

The Model Grocery 

LONG BEACH 

The Wall Co. 

RIVERSIDE 

C. F. Elder 

Alfred M. Lewis 

Sweet Grocery Co. 



CHARM 



If you will use 3C in the water whenever you wash, your friends from the East can no longer 
say "This water is dreadfully hard on your skin, isn't it, my dear?" 

It is a perfect water softener and can be used with your favorite soap for bath or shampoo 
A little in a glass of water absolutely cleans your rings. 



SAN BERNARDINO 

McNeil's Grocery 

Golden Rule 

Bates Grocery 

ARCADIA 

Shular Bros. 



You Can Buy 3C At These Places 



MONTROSE 
Hoffman- Fowler 

MONROVIA 
(Cellar Grocery Co. 

SIERRA MADRE 
T. Salury 



ALTADENA 
Altadena Grocery Store 

TORRENCE 
Paige's 

WATTS 
G. J. Burger 



MONETA 
■ R. W. Ahlberg 

GLENDALE 

All Grocery Stores 

COLTON 

Magills 

Burton-Powell Co. 



Page 26 



The CLUBWOMAN 




Horsemanship and Sporlsmansliip are I'aluable Assets at tlie Urban Summer Camp in the High Sierras 



EDUCATIONAL NOTES 
Urban Military Academy announces that the 
popular camp in the High Sierras will be con- 
ducted again this year. AVith twenty-three 
years' experience in educating bo5'S, it is no won- 
der that the Urban summer camp attracts boys 
from all parts ofthe country. Spectacular field 
days, rodeos and contests are always a feature of 
the summer camp program. 

Mr. Herman Hagedorn read selections from 
his works Friday evening, March 26, at the 
Marlborough School to an appreciative group 
who welcomed the opportunity" of hearing this 
well known poet. Mr. Hagedorn is perhaps best 
known as the biographer of Theodore Roosevelt 
and his poetry is represented in practically all of 
the modern American anthologies. His sonnet 
"Doors" has been included in a collection of the 
hundred best sonnets in the English language. 
At present Mr. Hagedorn is at work on a new 
photoplay "Rough Riders," based on incidents 



VOICE AND SILENT SINGING 

Exercises by which great, singers build and restore the 

voice. Equally valuable for the health and speaking 

voice of those who do not sing. 

Mme. Irwin Kellogg 

Friday Morning Club House. Mondays and Fridays. 
Res. Phone WHitney 7793. FAber 1648. 



in the life of Roosevelt. Alice Coleman Batch- 
elder, pianist, and Laura Kelsey Allen, violinist, 
played the Caesar Franck Sonata as a part of the 
program, which was ' under the auspices of the 
Radcliffe Club of Southern California, for the 
benefit of the Radcliffe College Endowment 
Fund. 



WESTLAKE SCHOOL 

FOR GIRLS 

Resident and Day School 
333 S. Westmoreland Ave. Loa Angeles 



KENWOOD HALL 

Resident and day school for gfirls. Sub-primary 
through High School. Spanish, French, Expres- 
sion. Dancing included in regular tuition. 673 
S. Vermont Ave., Los Angeles. WAshington 1 612. 



Los Angeles : 617.619S. Broadway 
Pasadena : Colorado at Los RobiM 

Apparel for Women, Misses and Juniors 



APRIL, 1926 



Page 27 



SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 

As a result of personal inquiry The Clubwoman takes pleasure in commending to California 
clubwomen the schools whose announcements appear in The Clubvfoman. 



NEWLY LOCATED IN GLENDORA 
FOOTHILLS 

Girls' CollesiatE ^ct)ool 

Day and Boarding School 
Thirty-fourth year. Accredited E^st and 
West. New Buildings. Miss Parsons and 
Miss Dennen, Principals. Tel. Glendora 

44783. City office "Ask Mr. Foster." 

Information Service — Robinson's Dept. 
Store, 7th St. and Grand Ave. Tel. BR. 
470L 

Cumnock ^t^ool 

Thirty-First Year 

School of Expression, Academy and accredited 

high school in Class A, preparing for western 

and eastern universities. 

Complete courses in 

Vocal Interpretation of Art 

Literature Public Speaking 

Literary Appreciation Journalism 

Story-Telling Story Writing 

Voice and Diction Dramatic Art 

Aesthetic Dancing 

HELEN A. BROOKS, Director 

5353 West Third Street 

GRanite 3253 GR anite 3353 Los Angeles 



University of Southern California 

Bulletins with full description of 

courses on application 

Address Registrar 

University of Southern California 
35th and University Ave. Los Angeles 



ELLIOTT SCHOOL 

FOR GIRLS 

Residence and Day School. Sub-Primary 
through Eleventh Grade. Ideal Honne 
Life. Character Building. Superior Edu- 
cational Advantages. Out-Door Classes. 

MARTHA COLLINS WEAVER, Principal. 

Gramercy Place at Pico Blvd., Los Angeles 



"The Coming West Point of the West" 

San Diego Army & Navy 
Academy 

The Academy enjoys the highest Scholastic rat- 
ing of the Univ. of Calif.- — "Division A." It is 
under Government supervision. It emphasizes 
Christian Character Training. Address for infor- 
mation Col. Thos. A. Davis, Pres. Pacific Beach. 
Calif. 



jilarlbotousi) ^ci)ooI for igirlsi 

Established 1889 
5029 W. 3rd St. Los Angeles 

Boarding and Day School 

Accredited to Eastern and Western 

Colleges 

Ada S. Blake, A. B„ Principal 

PAGE MILITARY ACADEMY 

A BIG SCHOOL FOR LITTLE BOYS 

The largest of its class In America. Ererythlng adapted 
to meet the needs of the smaller boy. Five fireproof 
buildings; seven-acre campus; seventeen resident teachers. 
Here a boy Is taught self-reliance. Through military 
training he acquires habits of exactness, the spirit or 
team work and co-operation and also energy and Initia- 
tive — the best preparation for life, no matter what pro- 
fession he may follow. Let our Catalogue tell you all 
about our school. 

BOBERT A. GIBBS. Headmaster 

1257 Cochran Avenue 

EMplre 9103. LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



URBAN 

Military Academy 

The Great Outdoor School 



for the building of Body and Brain and Character 
with Sports and Pastimes. Under Matchless Con- 
ditions. Address the Secretary, Miss Keller, 63 7 
Wilcox Ave., Los Angeles. 



Pacific Military Academy 

Culver City 

Boarding and Day School. Beautiful new Italian 
Renaissance type buildings. Excellent Faculty. 
Out-door Classes. All athletics, swimming, gyni- 
nasium, horseback riding and music. Enter any 
time in Grammar or High School. References 
required. For catalogue write Secretary or Phone 
Culver City 3294. 



The Greenwood School 

FOR GIRLS 

Select Resident and Day School. Limited Num- 
ber. In Session All Year. Principals: Mrs. M. 
Greenwood (Newnham College, Cambridge), Mr. 
H. F. Greenwood, B.A. (Corpus Christi College, 
Cambridge) . 5928 Franklin Avenue, Hollywood. 



Page 28 



The CLUBWOMAN 



private ledger prove this to have been the case. 
They are: 'For taking ye ladies to ye Micro- 
cosm, £1.8, and, for taking j'e ladies to ye Micro- 
cosm, £1.4.' 

" 'The Microcosm,' to condense an adver- 
tisement from the New York Gazette, 1756, 'ex- 
hibited an amazing variety of moving figures and 
scenes, diversified with natural beauties, opera- 
tions of art, of human employments and diver- 
sions, all passing as in real life, besides many 
celestial phenomena ; the pictures are composed 
of a combination of the most beautiful architec- 
ture, sculpture, and painting ; the inward con- 
tents are judiciously adapted to gratify the ear 
and eye and understanding. 

" 'It was built by the late Mr. Henry Bridges 
of London, and received the approbation and ap- 
plause of the Royal Society, and had been the 
admiration of every spectator. 

" 'When the ^vhole machine is in motion, there 
are upwards of twelve-hundred wheels and pin- 
ions moving at once. And during the whole per- 
formance it plays several fine pieces of music 
on the organ and other instruments, both single 
and in concert, in a very elegant manner. " 

"The art-and-craft of moving pictures waited 
for over a century and a half, the inventions of 
photography, electrical appliances, and the cel- 
luloid film reel, for development, and is only 
just now, after nearly two hundred years, begin- 
ning to take up again the idea which Mr. 
Bridges originated, of the delightful and mani- 
fold possibilities of moving pictures as a method 
in education, to quote his own words: 'the most 
instructive as well as entertaining.' " 



COLLEGE WOMEN'S CLUB 
OF LONG BEACH 

By Grace E. Irvin, Press Chairman 

, Members of the College Women's Club are 
expressing themselves as highly pleased with the 
excellent programs arranged by the program 
committee for the year. 

Dinners, which have preceded many of the 
lectures, have placed the audience in that mood 
most adapted to bring forth the best that is in 
both the speaker and the musician, as well as 
strengthening the bonds of friendship between 
the club members. 

The social committee has plans by which the 
entire membership shall be entertained during 
the month of April. They have divided the 
membership, according to residence, into five 
groups. Each group is to be entertained at the 
home of one member of the group. It is hoped 
these sectional meetings, being purely social, will 
enable members to make new and intimate frinds. 

A general reception and tea is being planned by 
the executive board, at the suggestion of our 
president, Mrs. O. P. Bell, for the month of 



May. The guests of honor at this tea are to be 
the girls graduated from the Long Beach High 
School during the current year. It is Mrs. 
Bell's thought that the club should mean some- 
thing to these girls and that the college women 
could, in this way, show the girls that they are 
interested in them and wish to encourage them to 
go forward into some college of learning. 

The scholarship committee has sponsored a 
series of silver teas at the Y.W.C.A. during the 
winter months and netted a small sum for the 
scholarship fund. They are now planning a 
bridge tea and later will give an evening for 
bridge and dancing, thereby materially increas- 
ing the scholarship fund as well as furnishing a 
means by which members may entertain friends. 

Blanks have already been sent to each mem- 
ber of the club, asking that names be suggested 
for each office for the coming year, to enable the 
nominating committee to arrange on the ballot 
those people selected by the club as a whole. 

The club is not only serving the community 
but is offering to its members much of sociability 
and intellectual enjoyment. 



WOMEN'S CLUB OFTORRANCE 

By Phoebe J. Aiilburn, Press Representative 

Mrs. M. L. May, chairman of California 
History and Landmarks, presented a delightful 
program at the meeting of March 16 with Mrs. 
A. S. C. Forbes and Florence Dodson Schone- 
man as speakers. Mrs. Schoneman wore a beau- 
tiful Spanish dress, 150 years old. 

Miss Joanna Neelands, daughter of a club 
officer, attired as a Spanish senorita, gave a 
Spanish dance. Mrs. Schoneman complimented 
Miss Neelands on the correctness of her costume. 

Members of the club are preparing to give 
a minstrel show on April 23. 

A section of Literature has been formed under 
Mrs. H. C. Dolley and meets once a month. 

The Junior Auxiliary has installed a telephone 
in the clubhouse. 

Reciprocity Day was celebrated on March 2 
with 150 out of town guests present. 



WOMENS AUXILIARY R. M. A. 

By Mrs. M. I. Clemmer, Press Chairman 
Honoring its past presidents, the Women's 
Auxiliary of the Railway Mail Association gave 
a luncheon at Serrano Inn, 629 South Serrano, 
March 15. The spirit of St. Patrick hovered 
o'er the long tables and lived again in the vivid 
hues which profusely and in every form imagin- 
able expressed the last word in artistic decora- 
tions, carried out by Mrs. George M. Waldie. 
Mrs. Charles M. Kite, toast mistress, in her 
efficient way took us back to the birth of our 
organization seventeen years ago. Eulogizing 
the memory of Mrs. F. I. R. Moore, mother and 
founder of the club, she referred to the sharp 



APRIL, 1926 



Page 29 



experiences incident to pioneering and emphasized 
the need of continual kindness. 

Mrs. Donald Macdonald beautifully portrayed 
the characteristics of each president in turn, laud- 
ing their loyalty and reminding that Mrs. Moore 
and Mrs. Herbert Jones are ^vith us still in 
spirit. The other presidents when introduced, 
voiced sentiments of love, appreciation and 
service. 

First on the afternoon program ■was Miss 
Sylvia Pederson, who rendered three delightful 
solos with Mrs. S. R. Oates at the piano. We 
are justly proud of this daughter of the club. 
Mrs. Alice Palmer Henderson concluded the day 
of reminiscenses with a very interesting talk on 
"Travel." From Alaska to India she gave us 
intimate glimpses of her life experiences. 

Mrs. John Diephaus announces a dinner and 
card party to be given April 16 at 1828 Ooak 
street, corner Washington. Please make reser- 
vations. 



PHILANTHROPY AND CIVIC 
CLUB 

Py Mrs. Herbert Denitz, Press Chairman 
Honoring those of its members %vhose birth- 
days occurred during February, and especially 
honoring its president, Lillian Burkhart Gold- 
smith, the Philanthropy and Civics Club held the 
most beautiful meeting of the year, Thursday 
afternoon, February 25 when 140 members 
gathered at the clubhouse in South Wilton Place. 
Large baskets and boxes of flowers, together with 
gifts, were artistically grouped about the presi- 
dent's table, these being remembrances from Mrs. 
Goldsmith's many friends, while daffodils, roses, 
and tall silver candelabra decorated the stage and 
luncheon tables. 

Following the welcoming address and birth- 
day greeting by the president, Mrs. Joseph Bon- 
haus, vice-president, toasted Mrs. Goldsmith 
with the following poem, written especially for 
the occasion by Mrs. Albert R. Pennick: 

"This gift to you is a token 14 

Of friendship's golden strand 
That through the years unbroken 
In our fond hearts will stand. 
It's gold to a golden woman. 
It's gold to her that's true ; 
And by this golden token 
Our love to you renew." 
At the conclusion of the reading, Mrs. Goldsmith 
was presented with a purse of gold, with the 
privilege of selecting any gift she might per- 
sonally desire. 

Among the prominent women who attended 
the luncheon were Mrs. J. J. Doyle, Mrs. Wal- 
ter Harrison Fisher, State Chairman of Com- 
munity Service, Mrs. Michael Pehr, Miss Rose 
Bryant, president of the Big Sisters' League, and 



Mrs. Tracy Q. Hall. Other members of the 
club whose birthdays were celebrated included 
Mrs. Frank Graff, Mrs. Fanny Esten, Mrs. 
Charles Seibert, Mrs. Harry L. Rhodes, and 
Mrs. Diane Sukeprts. 

Concluding the afternoon. Miss Tilda Rohr, 
soprano, accompanied by Miss Nina Blanch Hor- 
ner, rendered a delightful musical program. 



THE LINCOLN STUDY CLUB 
OF LOS ANGELUS 

By Margaret Clausen, Press Chairman 

Due to Phoebe James, chairman of Music, and 
Marie McAllister, chairman of Drama, the 
opera reading section of the Lincoln Study Club 
has been a great success. The operas that have 
been presented to the club were Martha, Car- 
men, Natoma and Rigoletto. In December, 
1925, Caroline Pierson, music editor for the 
Daily News, beautifully presented an afternoon 
with Wagner. The following artists have as- 
sisted in the presentations : Gladys Blackwell 
Pickering, Florence Minot, Phoebe James, Mar- 
garet Clausen, James Murray, Percy Riker, A. 
Watson McAllister, Edward Nevis, and at the 
piano Mildred Gay, Mrs. C. Sidney Smith, and 
Phoebe James. Samson and Delilah and Ma- 
dame Butterfly will be last opera? of the ysdiX. 




For 
Every Baking 
Purpose 

Globe ^f^s Flour 



Your Grocer Has It 



Page 30 



The CLUBWOMAN 



GLEASON PARLIAMENTARY 
CLUB 

By Mrs. T. R. Murchison, Press Chairman 

As the name indicates, the Gleason Parliamen- 
tary Club's mr.in object is efficiency in Parliamen- 
tary Lav,". Tvirs. Ida C. Iverson will conduct 
the parliamentary practice at the next meeting. 
It is hoped that all members will be on time for 
this very important part of the program. 

To become a member of the Gleason Parlia- 
mentary Club, the proposed member must pass a 
satisfactory examination before the examining 
committee. An examination was held Saturday 
morning at 10 o'clock, in Studio A of the Fri- 
day Morning Club House on March 27. The 
directors' meeting follo^ved at 11 a.m., parli- 
mentary practice at 1 p.m. and regular meeting 
at 2 p.m. 

Mr. Adams, one of the Federal officers, talked 
on the enforcement of the Volstead Act. He 
told us something of the real status of affairs 
in reference to prohibition in this country. 

The lesson on American Citizenship was con- 
ducted bv Mrs. M. R. Tvler. 



PURE MILK 

"The white race cannot survive without dairy 
products." — Herbert Hoover. 

CHILD WELFARE WEEK 

The San Francisco EHstrict, California Fed- 
eration of Woman's Clubs, invited Mrs. J. 
Koughan, California Dairy Council Nutrition- 
ist, to give a series of lectures at the San Fran- 
cisco Civic Auditorium during the observance of 
Child Welfare Week, beginning March 8th. 
Mrs. Koughan, who is chairman of the Welfare 
Week Committee en Nutritive Value of Milk, 
had charge of Dairy Council's special ex- 
hibit at the auditorium. Dr. Mariana Bertola, 
president of the California Federation of 
Woman's Clubs, displayed great interest in 
Child Welfare Week and was honorary chair- 
man of the general committee. 

BY RADIO 

California Dairy Council is broadcasting a 
series of talks over KQW, the California Farm 
Bureau Radio Station at San Jose. Once each 
week we try to give to the listeners-in some new 
thought about the dairy industr5\ Why not 
tune in on Wednesday nights? 

Fred J. Hart, editor of the Farm Bureau 
Monthly, is director of Station KQW. 

HUMPTY-DUMPTY AT BANNING 

Humpty-Dumpty, California Dairy Council's 
Health Clown, who is Ray Law when his make- 
up is laid aside, was a welcome visitor at the 
schools in Banning. Alary Watson, in the third 



grade at the Beaumont Grammar School, wrote 
her impressions of Humpty-Dumpty, and they 
were printed in the school publication : 

Humpty-Dumpty and his dog visited our 
school. 

He was' a queer looking fellow. 

He wore orange and black trousers, a black 
coat and blue shirt and tie. 

He had red hair. 

He wore a high black hat and big round 
glasses. 

He told what a boy had eaten by using his 
big magnifying glass. 

He told us to eat vegetables and drink milk. 

He spanked a boy for eating greasy meat and 
drinking coffee. 

He knew how to change coffee into milk. 

This is what we said while he was doing the 
trick. 

"Tea is bad, 

Coffee is worse, 

Drink milk, 

Safety First." , ^ 

His dog did tricks too. He went up a ladder 
and brought down a doll. 

They were playing fire, and his dog was sav- 
ing the doll's life. 

We hope they will come again. 

— Mary Watson. 






which is 

'A Particular Milk 

For Particular 

People." 



Distributed in all parts of Los 

Angeles, Orange and San Diego 

Counties. 



CALL ARDEN DAIRVl 



APRIL, 1926 



Page 31 



LOS ANGELES TEACHERS' 
CLUB 

By Anna Davis Clark, Press Chairman 

The Los Angeles City Teachers' Club has 
been the scene of so much activity lately it is 
hard to know where to begin. 

It is the custom of the club to hold Member- 
ship Meetings twice a month, at which time tea 
is serv'ed and some sfwaker of note addresses the 
assembled members. 

We have been fortunate in having an after- 
noon with Mrs. Dorsey, Superintendent of 
Schools, who gave an informal talk on the 
"Duties of the Superintendent," the keynote of 
which was the question, "Are we giving an ade- 
quate return to the public for the vast amounts 
of money spent by the public for education?" 
After hearing of the manifold details connected 
with bond issues, buildings, equipment, teacher 
examinations, supervising the supervisors, spon- 
soring community lectures and concerts, we 
could only say with Hamlet, "There are more 
things in heaven and earth than are dreamed of 
in thy philosophy, Horatio," and feel convinced 
that the teaching body does not do all the work. 

Next on our program came Dr. Mariana Ber- 
tola of San Francisco, President of the Califor- 
nia Federation of Women's Clubs. We congrat- 



ulated ourselves on having Dr. Bertola on her 
first official visit to the South and her address 
on "Truth With the Children" was received 
with great enthusiasm by a large number of 
teachers. Dr. Bertola told of a most interesting 
e.xperiment made by a Harvard professor who 
directed a certain group of students through 
four years of effort to live in public activity and 
in private life by the resolution, "I will not lie." 
The outcome in personal history of the class was 
well worth the trial. Dr. Bertola left with us 
the thought of Mrs. Sherman, "Service is the 
price we pay for the space we occup\." 

Our own State Superintendent of Public In- 
struction, Mr. Will C. Wood, was ^vith us on 
Washington's Birthday and his illuminating re- 
marks on legislation were heard by a large 
number of teachers. The details interest us but 
the general effects are far-reaching in that all 
progressive and beneficial legislation reacts fa- 
\orably upon the school children of today who 
are in turn the citizens of tomorrow. In clos- 
ing Mr. Wood said, "With the exception of tw^o 
>ears we have been treated splendidly and have 
put through a program rightly regarded as one 
of the most advanced in the country. Much is 
yet to be done towards improving the status of 
the teacher, but we are justified in having hope." 



rT^HESE] are tHe positions and scores 
•^ gi-ven AdoHr samples in five import- 
ant and competiti-ve contests for certified 
niillc dixring tHe year 192S: 



February City Health Department, Los Angeles First 

May National Contest, Atlantic City, N. J. First 

July City Health Department, Los Angeles 

September California State Fair, Sacramento First 

November Pacific Slope Dairy Show, Oakland First 



comparative 
scores not 
announced 



98.4% 
99.5% 
99.0% 

97.7% 
98.7% 



The quality and cleanliness of 
this nationally famous milk are 
unchanging day in and day out. 

>DOHl GUERNSEY CERTIFIED MILK 

for service, telephone TUcker 3560 



Page 32 



The CLUBWOMAN! 



SOROPTIMIST CLUB OF LOS ANGELES 



By Alice Mavor Edwards, Secretary 

We are still a bit breathless from it — our 
Business and Style Show which took place on 
March 23 rd in the Biltmore's beautiful ball- 
room. That it was successful we have been told 
b\' the seven hundred guests who attended the 
luncheon program, and by the crowds who took 
in the exhibits in the foyer where nearly a hun- 
dred active business and professional women 
showed what women are contributing to the 
growth of Los Angeles. Almost every variety 
of food ; household appliances ; interior decora- 
tions ; all manner of wearing apparel, automo- 
bile fixtures, furniture, printing, sick-room sup- 
plies, schools of dancing, advertising, music, the 
professions of medicine, law, osteopathy, chirop- 
ody, chiropractic, psycho-analyst, engraving — it 
would take a complete club roster to show the 
varieties of exhibits. 

And the program opened by Mayor Cryer, 
who was reminiscent of our first installation, also 
showed a symbolic setting for classified busi- 
ness. Our president, showed Books by a clever 
dancer in "The Green Hat," "Fairy Stories" 
a tiny dancer with wings, "Little Black Sambo" 
and "The Gingerbread Man" in costume. 
Norma Gould's students formed a large part 
of the program appearing not only in "Books", 
and in the exhibit of "Shoes", but in a wonder- 
ful individual number; "Moth and Flame" and 
in an old fashioned minuet, and also in "Art in 
the Making." Agnes Woodward presented 
"The Whistling News Boy"; Alberta Gude 




Mrs. Gertrude C. Maynard 
President Soroptimist Club 





Marion Lois 

Director Program 
Soroptimist Business and Style Show 



Ada S. Watson 

Director Exhibits 

Business and Style Shoiv Soroptimist Club 

Lynch "The Little Lady in a Golden Shoe" 
with attendant knights. Clever children intro- 
duced "Men's Shoes." The Business Sales Serv- 
ice of Marion Lois; Phoebe Ara White's Music, 
and "My Book House", and Anne Harrison's 
Pageants; a marvelous bagpiper with a group 
of golfers in correct togs and perfect equipment 
showing Ada Watson's Golf. Our City Mother 
showed that her Soroptimist children could com- 
pletely outfit her. A floral fan made of thou- 
sands of lilies of the valley, sweet peas, and or- 



APRIL, 1926 



Page 33 



Directory of California Products 

For the convenience of the seventy thousand clubwomen of California and the many othera 
who have enthusiastically subscribed to the campaign of the v/omen's clubs to promote in every pos- 
sible way the use by Californians of California products, The Clubw^oman, mouthpiece of the cam- 
paign, presents the following partial classified list of Classified products. In planning their shop- 
ping, clubwomen will find this list handy reference guide to what to order in carrying out their 
pledge to buy Califronia-made goods wherever possible. 



AWNINGS 

Acme Tent and Awning Co. — Canopies. 
4069 Mission Road, Los Angeles. Tele- 
phone CApitol 7380. 

BUILDING MATERIALS 
Doors-Sash-Screens Veneered Doors, High 

Grade Interior Finish — Pacific Door & 

Sash Co. 
Hardwood Floor Finishers and Contractors 

— National Floor Co., Los Angeles. 
Mirrors, Sand, Plaster, Vitrolite — Raphael 

Glass Co., Los Angeles. 

Pioneer Paper Co., Manufacturers of Roof- 
ings. 

Sash-Doors-Hardwoods-Hardware — Frank 
Graves Sash, Door and Mill Co. 

CLOTHING 

"Bentsknit," "Ribstitched," Bathing Suits 

and Sweaters Pacific Knitting Mills, Los 

Angeles. 

"Summers Quality" outing and work cloth- 
ing for men and boys Summers Mfg. 

Co., Inc. 

CARPET CLEANING 
City Steam Carpet Cleaning Works, John 
Bloeser, Main 0430. New Rugs. 

FOODS 
Honey Nut Bread — "It's the Flavor" 
Baruch Baking Co., 3545 Pasadena Ave. 
Phone CApitol 5 770. 

' Biscuits, crackers, etc. — Pacific Coast Bis- 
cuit Co., Los Angeles. 

I Capitol Products, flour, etc. — Capitol Mill- 
ing Co., Los Angeles. 

1 Christopher Co., L. J. — Quality Ice Cream 
and Candies. 

Faultless Bread "Let your daily bread be 

Faultless." Faultless Bread Bakery, Los 
Angeles. 

Globe "A!" Flour, Macaroni Products and 

Cereals Globe Grain and Milling Co., 

Los Angeles. 

Iris Brand "Over 200 Wonderful Things to 
Eat" — Distributed by Haas, Baruch & 
Co., Los Angeles. 

Morola — Nut Margarine, Morris & Co., Los 
Angeles. 



Olson's Bread, "O So Good " — Olson Bak- 
ing Co., Los Angeles. 

Puritas Vacuum-packed Coffee — a Los An- 
geles product, at most grocers. 

Miss Saylor's, Inc., Unusual Chocolates, 
6752 Venice Blvd., Culver City. 

FURNITURE AND HOUSE FITTINGS 
Barker Bros., 716-738 South Broadway — 
Complete Furnishers of Successful Homes 
— Our "Own Make" and "Mastermade " 
Upholstered Furniture and Hand-tailored, 
"individualized" Mattresses and Box 
Springs. 
Inglewood Furniture — Inglewood Manufac- 
turing Co., Inglew^ood, Cal. 

Kling Furniture Kling Manufacturing Co., 

Los Angeles. 
Kwality Pillows, etc. — Kwality Feather Co., 

Los Angeles. 

Los Angeles Can Co. — Manufacturers of 

Tin Cans for all purposes. 

Sanotuf Mattress, furniture — Roberti Bros., 

Los Angeles. 
Stockwell Neverstretch Mattress — L. W. 

Stockwell Co., Los Angeles. 
Upholstered Furniture — Soronow's Furni- 
ture Manufacturing Co., Los Angeles. 

Window Shades Window Shade Products 

Company, 910 East Fourth St., Los An- 
geles. 
"Zenith" Upholstered Furniture and Mat- 
tresses Bailey-Schmitz Co., Los An- 
geles. 
Citizens Independent Ice & Cold Storage 
Co., 61 0-620 South Raymond Ave., Pasa- 
dena, California. Phone Colorado 30. 

GASOLINE AND MOTOR OIL 
Ventura Gasoline "California's Best," Ven- 
tura Motor Oil (Paraffin-Base) — Ventura 
Refining Co., Los Angeles. 

MOTOR TRUCKS 
Moreland Motor Truck Co., Los Angeles. 

ST ORAGE BATTERIES 
Hobbs Storage Batteries, Hobbs Storage 
Battery Corp., Los Angeles. 

WATER HEATERS 
De Luxe and Supreme Gas Water Heaters 
— General Water Heater Corp., 1601 
Compton Ave. 



Page 34 



The CLVBWOMAlSl 



chids in the hands of Rose Lathrop told the story 
of her florist shop. There were more attractive 
things, but we shall have to tell the story else- 
where. 

The Style Show with 20 dilTerent models showed 
sports and street wear, afternoon and dinner, and 
evening wear in hats, gowns, coats, furs, flowers, 
scarfs, shawls and shoes. We dreamed ourselves 
into all the mari'elous creations. Won't you all 
come next time ? 



LOS ANGELES EBELL 

(Continued from Page 15) 

spond to good advice. They found it easier 
to assert their will power. They were much 
more like real men than they had been when 
they first shuffled through the doors of the refuge. 

Self realization and self confidence are two 
points of vital importance in achieving success 
in any field and often the effect of good clothes 
brings these out or at least, the effect of being 
properly dressed for the position one occupies. 

I have interviewed dozens of men and women 
and have heard some men say — "when my wife 
feels a bit blue or when she says she is not feel- 
ing well, I tell her to get a new outfit and this 
does the work." You may say, but not all men 
are like that, nor say I, thank God, are all or 
many women, stooping to such measures, 
neither can all men afford to do this, but, I wish 
to emphasize that the idea of having new clothes 
has its psychology' and an effect on the wearer 
often stimulating and changing lethargic people 
into haying a definite aim : some like to exhale 
prosperity and show this to a friend. In my own 
work at the branch Consumptive Hospital, bed- 
ridden patients, when I have asked what I could 
bring them, would say, "a coat please" and the 
social worker would say to me : "She has to die, 
why bring her something she'll never wear"? 
I brought a coat just the same and the patient 
would say: "Walk around my bed in it and l?t 
me see how it looks." That poor soul visualized 
herself in the coat and as walking again and hav- 



ASK FOR 

CAPITOL 
PRODUCTS 

MANUFACTURED BY 

A HOME INDUSTRY 



ing something bright and warm all her own and 
while I do not say that such a granted request 
saved her from death, I do say that its psychol- 
ogy gave happiness in othenvise sad surround- 
ings. Mr. Herbert Spencer said that the char- 
acter of a political meeting can be inferred from 
the dress of those who attend. A mother who, 
in visiting her daughter at boarding school wore 
good clothes, said that her visits were a tonic ; 
if she had gone in shabby, careless clothes, it 
would have depressed the daughter. An actor's 
costume affects the real actor's psj'chology as 
much or more than it does that of his audience. 
He is the man he has made himself appear. 
"No wonder those old-fashioned women, our 
grandmothers, were dignified. Who could be 
anything else, wearing a dozen starched petti- 
coats and a tight, high-necked dress with long 
skirts?" There is a certain psychology quite 
aside from photographic value in permitting the 
star to have the colors and accessories she desires. 
When the director thinks a dark dress in a cer- 
tain episode will best express action, black is 
chosen if the actress prefers it, but if she insists 
on orange or red that photographs dark, the cos- 
tume is made up in that color. Gloria Swanson 
has her own designer, Rene Hubert. After de- 
sign, color and fabric are decided upon, she se- 
lects the accessories and with each costume uses 
a different perfume. In character wardrobe, the 
costume director chose a shop girl to buy the at- 
tire, she being typical of the character the star 
was to portray. Meighan's policeman uniform 
had to be made in New York by a tailor who 
furnishes the traffic policemen ■svith theii* uni- 
forms. When Meighan acted in "New Klon- 
dike", the role of an old-time ball-player, he con- 
ferred with John J. McGraw concerning what 
to wear for a baseball outfit. Carelessness in 
^\hat is worn in a scene may ivreck the picture, 
if a bow tie is seen in one stretch and a four-in- 
hand in the next while the character may not 
have left the room. Therefore, a list of clothes 
for the scene is kept and not only the stars, but 
all players consult that list, to be sure they do 
not make a mistake. The actor receives a list 
when he is told to report with silk hat, bow tie, 
wing collar, tail coat, striped trousers, patent 
leather boots, white shirt and watch and chain 
etc. Actresses like to revive triumphs of by-gone 
days, by turning over their wardrobes. Rachel 
brought out all her raiment, the drapery of 
Phedre worn to display her supernatural emo- 
tion, of Pauline, of Lesbia, of Marguerite and 
Adrienne and, realizing that she must die, ex- 
claimed, "I must leave all." Woman's first attire 
was the fig leaf but now, woman is forever with 
her costume, changing her moods and caprices. 
(Continued in Next Issue) 



§: 



i 



— And now you can have a 

San-o-tie 
Coil Spring 

Like the Sanatuf Mattress, the San- 
o-tie Coil Spring represents the ut- 
most in sleeping comfort. 

Manufactured in Los Angeles 
exclusively by 




I 346 Long Beach Ave. 
For Sale at Your Furniture Store. 



— you might as well have 

BEKINS SERVICE TO 

— move 
— ship 
— pack or 
— store 
your household goods, piano, rugs, trunks, 
motor car 

PLEASE PHONE 
WEstmore 4141 

LOS ANGELES 
1335 S. Figueroa St. 4th & Alameda Sts. 

HOLLYWOOD— BEVERLY HILLS 

Phone GLadstone 4793 

8421 Santa Monica Blvd. 

OFFICES and DEPOSITORIES AT: 

Los Angeles - San Francisco - Oakland 

Sacramento - Fresno - Hollywood 

Beverly Hills 




A. T. BAKER & CO., Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

VELOURS 



am 



CUT VELVETS 

for UPHOLSTERY PURPOSES 



NEW YORK 
41 UNION SQUARE 



LOS ANGELES 
SIXTH AND MAIN STS. 

CENTR.AL BLDG. CHICAGO 

Mills: 28 E. JACKSON BLVD. 

MtiiiayuTik, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Roxboro, North Carolina 



Vol. XVI 
Published Monthly 



MAY, 1926 No. 8 

Office 1425 Mission Street, South Pasadena 



Telephone EL. 2734; if no answer, EL. 1178 
Mail Address Box 26, South Pasadena, Cal. 



Snbacription Price SO Cents Per Year, Ten Cents the Copy Send subscriptions to Mrs. Bert Clifford, Box 26, 

South Pasadena, Cal. 
Edited by the Press Chairmen of the Clubs Represented 
Entered at the South Pasadena Postoffice as second-class matter. 



Gleason's Parliamentary Digest 

1110 West 30th Street ' 
LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 

Cloth Cover Digests, per copy $2.00 

Paper Cover Digests, per copy $1.50 

J* Lesson in Parliamentary Practice — Lesson and Drill 

Number Six — Includes Quiz upon 

Subsidiary Motions and Postponed Indefinitely and 

Drill Discussing 

Law Observance and Law Enforcement. 

Drill is an 8 page folder. 

Price 5 Cents per copy; 50 cents per dozen copies. 




Gifts 
From the Orient 

Tai Chan Co. 

Cloissone, Brass, Lac- 
quer, Porcelain, Kimo- 
nos, Haori and Man- 
darin Coats, Oriental 
Jewelry, Novelties. 

62 1 So. Flower St., L. A. 
(3 Doors No. of The Elite) 




West Ebell Club 



Page 4 



The CLUBJVOMJN 



POMONA EBELL 

By Mrs. Lester J. Fitch 

Pomona Ebell is to have a lawn fete on May 
21. It is to be a wonderful event on our own 
grounds. The committee in charge is planning 
a wide variety of entertainments in an endeavor 
to please every one. There will be a mystery 
fish-pond, baby shows, real and burlesque, booths 
for candy, orangeade, ice cream, hot dogs, aprons, 
etc., with various sideshows and entertainers. 
After a chicken dinner there will be dancing in 
the clubhouse. 

April 23 was our Reciprocity Day. Dr. Deni- 
son of Pomona College, head of the Philosophy 
Department, spoke then on the Federation theme 
"Conservation of Our Forces." 

During the past months there have been many 
programs of great inspiration and interest. The 
outstanding event of February was the visit of 
Dr. Bertola and Mrs. Lorbeer. On this occa- 
sion Pomona Ebell had the pleasure of inviting 
neighboring clubs to join her at luncheon to meet 
the state and district presidents. Dr. Bertola, 
in her talk to the club members, stressed the' 
value of the Federation and Child Welfare. "As 
a federation" she said, "we should stand for the 
best things, which include the care of mothers 
and children, those children who will be the citi- 
zens of tomorrow and who will make the United 
States what it is to be." She also gave a hasty 
resume of her lecture on "The Dangers of Im- 
proper Posture in the Young." 

We have held two evening meetings in lieu of 
regular afternoon sessions. The first one was a 
complimentary program arranged by the faculty 
and students of Pomona College and was given 
in Claremont at Bridges Hall of Music. This 
courtesy extended by the college was very de- 
lightful and the fine spirit of co'-operation was 
much appreciated. The second evening meeting 
was in honor of Ebell husbands. A dinner pre- 
ceded the program which was given by repre- 
sentatives of Russia, China and Mexico who 
spoke on "International Relations." 

The Philharmonic course, which Pomona 
Ebell sponsors, has enjoyed great success this sea- 
son, John McCormack and Claire Dux recently 
sang to crowded houses. The course as con- 
ducted by a committee of Ebell members is a 
splendid contribution to our communjty life. 




T/!e Uille de 
1 arts: 



Sale of yVhite 

— is an Annual Event of first 
Value-importance to women of 
Los Angeles! 

A Sale offering notable savings 
— stressing the Ville's Second 
and Fourth Floors . . . 

Sales of Silks and Woolens 
Sales of Wash Goods and 

Draperies 
Sales of Linens and Beddings 
Sales of Lingerie! 



SEVENTB*^ATOUVE 

aUDYASCO. 




Made by the Bakers of 
Snow Flakes 
Baked in the largest and most modern 
English type traveling oven in the west. 
May be purchased also by pound or 
package from most grocers on the 
Pacific Coast. 



SHORTIE 

OXFORD 

PETIT BEURRE 

BUFORD 



TIFFIN 

ARROWROOT 

DUNDEE 

AVON 



ORANGE NECTAR 
PANAMA CREAM 

PACIFIC COAST BISCUIT CO. 

Los Angeles San Francisco 

Sacramento Portland 

Seattle Tacoma Spokane 



MAY, 1926 



Page 5 



^.Jf^ 



Contents 



r-^^_^ 



Pomona Ebell 4 

Pasadena Shakespeare Club 6 

Los Angeles Ebell - 7 

Friday Morning Club 9 

Woman's Club of Hollywood 9 

The Women's University Club 14 

The Soroptimist Club _ 15 

Long Beach Ebell 18 

Los Angeles Audubon Society 20 

Highland Park Ebell 22 

California History and Landmarks 23 

Wednesday Morning Club 23 

Gleason Parliamentary Club 25 

Tuesday Afternoon Club of Glendale 28 

South Side Ebell 28 

Woman's Club of Huntington Park .". 29 

Alhambra Woman's Club 31 

W. A. R. M. A ! 31 

San Gabriel Woman's Club 32 





in beautifying your 
home furnishings 

Do you know that MUCH 
can be accomplished with 
very little expenditure of 
time or effort? 
Of course, you MUST 
KNOW HOW. It is easy 
to learn under proper guid- 
ance. And so. we have en- 
gaged a. very accomplished 
woman to teach anyone 
coming to our store. I to 
5 P. M. daily. 
Come early, but if more 
convenient to come later 
this month or next, write 
or phone for reservation. 



PRACTICAL 
Demonstrations 
of 
— Prizma Art Dyes, 
— Art Crystals 
— Dye Extracts 
— Photo Color Sets 
— JDecalcamanias 
— Poster Colors 
— Water and Oil 

Colors 
— Transfer Designs 
for Furniture 
{Full Supply of) 
— above items 
— Academy Boards 
— Art Kits 
— 'Wire Forms 
— ^Artist Tools 



PHONE TRinity 0051 

PICO AND HILL STS. 

THE MATHEWS PAINT COMPANY, Inc. 

MATH&WS 



Ladies 



would insist on "Inglewood Chairs" 

from their dealers, our factory could 
give employment to many more peo- 
ple. We make quality dining chairs in 
period patterns, breakfast tables and 
chairs, arm rockers, etc. 

Building up California industries 
helps you as well as us. 



\ 



Inglewood Manufacturing 
Company 



Inglewood 



California 



BOOKS FOR THE HOME 

Adventures in Homemaking — ^Robert & Eliza- 
beth Shackleton $4.00 

House & Home— Greta cfray .'. $2.50 

Practical Book of Furnishing the Small House 
and Apartment by E. S. HoUoway $6.50 

A Short History of .\rt— Charles H. Caffin $4.50 
Colour Planning of the Garden — G. F. 

Finley $15.00 

Gardening in California — Landscapes and 
Flower — by John McLaren $5.00 

A Home of Your Own— D. T. Lutes $3.50 

Standard Etiquette — \. S. Richardson $4.00 

A Thousand Ways to Please a Family — with 
Bettina's Best Recipes — L. B. Weaver & H. 
C. Le Cron $2.00 



The JONES 



Opposite 

Squire"' BOOK StOrC 

Los Angeles, CaIi(ornia 



426-428 
West 
Sixth 



Page 6 



The CLUBWOMAN 



PASADENA SHAKESPEARE CLUB 

By Mrs. Harry Colematij Press Chairman 



In presenting to the sister clubs of the state, 
a roster of the officers who will direct their ac- 
tivities for the coming year, the members of the 
Shakespeare Club of Pasadena feel that Mrs. 
Joseph H. Dorn who heads the list as president 
elect, is a particularly happy choice. For three 
years she has been a member of the board of di- 
rectors as chairman of public affairs and as first 
vice-president. While not going so far as to 
claim that Mrs. Dorn had been trained, as are 
princesses, from the cradle, yet the members of 
this club are convinced that every influence of 
her life apparently has been one supposedly lead- 
ing toward the ideal which every clubwoman 
knows but to which few attain. 

As a daughter of Judge William W. Jackson 
of Wisconsin, that pioneer jurist and legislator 
who spent his life in the determination that only 
the best should be written of his state, Mrs. 
Dorn grew up amid surroundings where public 
affairs were viewed in the light of an understand- 
ing based on education and fortified by principles 





II 



Mrs. J. W. Morin 
Program chairman and third -vice-president, Shake- 
speare Club of Pasadena Photo by Maryland 
Studio 



Mrs. Joseph H. Dorn 

President-elect, Shakespeare Club of Pasadena. 

Photo by Maryland Studio 

of religious faith. She was named for her 
mother, Jane Elizabeth Preston, a descendant 
of Knickerbocker stock and American Revolu- 
tionary heroes. From the very first the little 
Elizabeth wanted to become a teacher of children 
and when she took her diploma from the Toma, 
Wisconsin, High School, though barely seven- 
teen, she slipped at once into the teacher's chair 
of the Toma kindergarten. Thus demonstrat- 
ing that her love for the profession was not 
merely a childish fancy, she was sent to the Sioux 
City Normal College. After graduating she re- 
sumed her teaching, weaving periods of Euro- 
pean travel and courses at Columbia University 
into the pattern of her occupation. Then Cali- 
fornia called and in Pasadena she became the be- 
loved "Miss Jackson of McKinley" school. In 
1916 the schools again lost to matrimony in the 
great game of life but Mrs. Dorn in the midst 
of her many resultant social duties is loathe to 
forget her earlier life work. She is still beloved 
to scores of youngsters as superintendent of the 
kindergarten department of the First Methodist 
(Continued on Page 34) 



MAY, 1926 



Page 7 



liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiillllllllllllllllllllllllliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

By Emma B. Keepers, Press Chairman 



THE BROWNING STUDY CLASS OF 
EBELL CLUB 

"Would you have your song endure — 
build on the human heart." 

The optimism of Robert Browning is only 
equalled by that of Elizabeth Barrett Browning. 

"Thy love shall chant its own beatitudes after 
its own self working. A child's kiss set on the 
sighing lips shall make thee glad. A poor man 
served by thee shall make thee rich. A sick man 
helped by thee shall make thee strong. Thou 
shalt be served thyself, by every sense of serv- 
ice which thou renderest." How is it that the 
question is so often asked — "Are there still 
women who have time to devote to the study of 
Browning?" Jveisure given to the reading of 
poetry is never lost. Even the time given to 
the passing modern verse is not in vain. So 
can there be one lost moment of time given to 
the constructive poetry of a man of such vast 
learning as Robert Browning? He makes phil- 
osophy o'er flow and flood in wells of color 
glorious as the dawn. Who of us desires to be 
"a finished and finite clod — untroubled by a 
spark?" This modern pose of flippancy, let us 
hope, is planted in soil so shallow that it will 
not live. Yet "gifts should prove their use" — 
and "when we summon age to grant youth's 
heritage," shall we who have striven — to attain, 
and appropriate the beautiful, be allowed to 
ignore any of the strength of Browning — who 
has taught us to discern, compare, pronounce 
and comprehend the right, and good, and in- 
finite? Still who shall arbitrate — ten men love 
what I hate — and so those who will may study 
Browning, and those who do not, must find 
their pleasure in other things. 

Mrs. Milton K. Young is leader of this de- 
partment and she brings to her work years of 
sincere devotion to the study of Browning. She 
is an ardent student. She is still on the board of 
The Browning Society of Los Angeles and while 
she was its president she did much to develop 
the club. The birthday program which is a mat- 
ter of great interest each year in this department 
is to be celebrated by the usual luncheon and a 
play. This year Mrs. 'Young has arranged for 
the production of Browning's most important 
play, "A Bolt in the 'Scutcheon,' " that play 
of which Dickens said he would give all his 
works to have written. This drama is an ambi- 
tious undertaking for amateurs — but the Ebell 
Club has dramatic talent and Mrs. Young has 
enlisted their enthusiasm. Her faith has in- 
spired them. True McCready produced it in 




Mrs. Milton K. Youne/ 
Drama leader of Ebell. Photo by Boye 

the beginning — but then we had no Drama work- 
shop in the Ebell Club and we know Mrs. Ben- 
der will prove herself capable. In the words 
of Elizabeth B. Browning: 

"Others shall take patience and courage to 
their heart and hand, from thy hand and thy 
heart and thy brave cheer, and God's grace 
fructify through thee to all." 



PSYCHOLOGY OF DRESS 
By Pauline Rice Shields 
(Continued from last month) 
In high rufl she grows stately, in plaid draperies 
grandiose, with ribbons and buckles, coquettish 
languid in a trained skirt, vivacious and ener- 
getic in a short dress. The woman and the 
gown mutually act and react on each other. It 
would be a limitation if a woman adhered to one 
st5de of dress and would lead to monotony, nar- 



Page 8 



The CLUBWOMAN 



rowness and pedantry. A Gainsboro hat in it- 
self suggests beauty of a delicately spirited and 
patrician type, but, after seeing every variety of 
commonplace feature under the rolling and 
plumed brim, one learns that only the ambi- 
tious wear it and that only one style is suited to 
pretty vv^omen and that is the simplest. Many 
novelist are stressing the effect of clothes. Royal 
Brown, in his story, "You Are Young Only 
Once", has a telephone operator draw $200.00 
and go on a shopping tour and describes the ef- 
fect of a new hat in her life. She has seen her 
young husband going with a well-dressed girl. 
She makes him jealous but wins him back and 
begins saving all over again. Vanity plays a 
great part in the psychology of clothes. In 
Anzia Yezierska's book, "Breadgivers", Mashah, 
the youngest daughter first took her Avages to 
make herself more beautiful, on her way home 
from work always looked in the shop windows 
for what was the prettiest and latest style. 
Mashah with a bunch of men buzzing round her, 
like flies round a pot of honey. Mashah was a 
pleasure to look on, beautiful and smiling, like 
a doll from a show window. She hung up her 
hat with pink roses on a nail on the wall and 
* said, "the freshness of men, I can't walk the 
street without a million eyes after me." Re- 
becca West says, "I am insane on the subject 
of clothes. I put them quite high among art 
forms, for it seems to me, as much an enhance- 
ment of life to have beautiful clothes, worn on 
people sitting in a room, as it is, to have beau- 
tiful pictures hanging on the walls. My insanity 
is of a different order. When I am tired or ill, 
it seems to me that I have no clothes. I may 
have half a dozen evening dresses hanging in my 
wardrobe, but, if the fit comes on me, I will sit 
blankly in my bedroom, while the guests I have 
asked to dinner, wait in my drawing-room, be- 
cause I am in the grip of this strange, emotional 
conviction that I have nothing to wear. I finalh' 
have to pull myself together and force myself to 
put on some dress, which then seems to me, 
though I know perfectly well, that it is a worthy 
product of Nicole Groult, a worthless rag. I 
cannot entirely understand this feeling. It may 
be due to the fact, that I never had any but the 
poorest and plainest clothes as a child and that 
I simply cannot believe that I have any others 
novi'. But I think it goes rather deeper than 
that. I fancy I am unconsciously trying to iden- 
tify myself with my mother in every possible way 
and that it seems incongruous, that I should have 
good clothes, when she did not." So clothes are 
an authentic part of that eternal Becoming, 
which is Life. Gerald Heard in his book, "Nar- 
cissus or an Anatomy of Clothes" believes in an 
organic relation of dress and architecture. The 
display of animals in pelt and plumage are noth- 
ing but secondary sexual characteristics. The 



raiment is no less part of the human life than 
is the petal a part of the flowers. The collar 
of a man is a great petal, with the man's head 
as stamen. The closest relation exists between 
architecture and dress. Man was driven by cold 
to the caves. When weaving came, the woven 
wattle rose into walls, the plaided cloth fell into 
garments. The lattice work, which until wood 
is abandoned is the final term of all building, is 
still printed, like the shadows of river reeds on 
the zebra. Thereafter progress is definite and 
the two concentric circles enlarge, but are never 
wholly out of touch. As the body settled down, 
weapons and clothes evolve, as the mind follows 
suit, another ring is projected and cities arise. 
Gerald Heard compares the Assyrian Mitre 
worn by kings, to the Mesopotamian Ziggurat. 
The Minoans gloried in their body, but tapered 
their pillars and vases at the wrong end. The 
Greek said: "Take off your clothes and be nice 
and natural." The Roman had no objection to 
watching a Greek exhibit, but he remained 
wrapped in his toga. At the dawn of the Middle 
Age dress has already been affected by architec- 
ture. The pointed arch and pointed shoe ad- 
vance together. Long hose translates in anatomy 
the clear-standing shaft. The four centered Tu- 
dor arch of Gothic's last phase brought the 
square cap worn by Henry VII, Bishop Fisher 
of Rochester, Sir Thomas Moore. Formerly an 
architect had only to design rooms, the only chan- 
nels for which he had to provide were stairs and 
chimneys. Now he has to clothe series of pipes 
and communications, valves and orifices, until 
his task is utterly beyond any but genius. Their 
work must approximate more to the tailor's and 
less to the builder's. They must hang and fit 
and stitch onto the body the engineer gives. 
We may live to change our buildings as quickly 
as a woman her clothes. Already nice people 
prefer to live in a cottage, and keep a good car. 
Soon the vestigial remnant of home will be a 
locker in a golf club or a reserved parking plot 
on a favorite common. And why not? When 
Mother Nature is clothed in the greatest beauty 
and offers the lure of God's California out of 
doors, a 350 foot wisteria robe at Sierra Madre 
and a vari-colored rainbow freesia one at San 
Fernando. If the Psychology of Dress brings 
us back to this Garden of Eden, chameleon-like, 
let us bask in the sun and take on the color, 
which harmonizes in our daily contact with all 
that is upbuilding inspiring and clean. For that 
which darkness is to vice, sunlight is to purity. 



MAY, 1926 



Page 9 



FRIDAY ^MORNINQ CLXTB 



(All article read by Mrs. William Waller Slayden. Recording 
Secretai-y of the Friday Morning Club, giving her worlv of tlie year 
just past in tile Disti'ict Federation of Club.) 

The Federation Extension Department of the 
Los Angeles District, California Federation of 
Women's Clubs, has been functioning actively 
and earnestly, trying to hold the high standard 
of effort and accomplishment set by last year's 
chairman, Mrs. James Birney Lorbeer, now our 
own beloved district president. 

First of all the aim has been to given a finer 
appreciation of the spirit of Federation for it is 
"the spirit that giveth life. The Federation is 
simply a spiritual holding together of all forces 
of womanhood. At all times we have tried to 
work in harmony with the ideals for which the 
Federation stands and to weave into the fabric 
of our efforts the special thought for the year, 
"Conservation and Stimulation of Constructive 
Forces." Using the words of Mrs. Lorbeer, 
"The Federation exists, not to promote any one 
line of thought and action but to conserve and 
stimulate every constructive force for good," 
and the Federation Extension Department has 
tried to emphasize this thought in every way. 

It has been the purpose to keep in touch with 
the clubs in the Federation, trying to feel the 
current that is stirring the hearts of the women 
throughout the district. When it has been hu- 
manly possible, the chairman or vice-chairman 
has responded to every call to visit clubs and 
we have tried by our sympathy and understand- 
ing to be an inspiration there ; to stress the high 
lights of Federation strength ; and to give a real 
impetus to Federation endeavor. We have tried 
to convey the feeling of real friendliness and an 
interest in the problems of each. 

The Federation Extension Department has 
held conferences each month beginning in Octo- 
ber, 1925. One hundred and eighteen secre- 
taries and twenty district chairmen have regis- 
tered at these meetings; also the Director Gen- 
eral for California, Mrs. Aaron Schloss and 
the Junior Past State President, Mrs. J. C. Ur- 
quhart. 

The Federation secretaries have been unusual 
in their interest and co-operation. Twenty-one 
of these chairmen have been 100 per cent in at- 
tendance ; twelve others have been either pres- 
ent or respresented ; twenty-four have been ab- 
sent only once. We are proud of this record. 

In order to give a better understanding of the 
scope of Federation, an opportunity has been 
given each month to know the work ofdifferent 
departments through the courtesy of the District 
Chairmen who so graciously have come to us. 




Mrs. William Waller Slayden 

Recording Secretary of the Friday Morning Club. 

Photo by Witzel 

There has been time for discussion and vital 
points have been amphasized. 

Following the plan of last year, we have con- 
tinued the Hyphen Race. The object of this is 
to build up the conferences of all departments 
into strong working bodies and it has been the 
duty and pleasure of each secretary to keep the 
chairmen of all departments in her club in touch 
with the conference schedule, to follow up the 
attendance at these meetings and to inspire a 
stronger sense of the value of the meetings and 
the need of regularity in attendance. 

This year forty secretaries kept accurate rec- 
ords. One club reports eighteen chairmen at- 
tended all conferences ; two clubs report eleven 
attended or were represented at all conferences. 
Some of the secretaries have worked out inter- 
esting charts of conference attendance to be seen ' 
hanging proudly upon the walls of their club- 
houses, and on which the record is kept in a 
simple but effective manner. 



Page 10 



The CLUBWOMAN 



This Hyphen Race was originated by our be- 
loved Mrs. Charles H. Toil. The name was 
based upon the word co-operation. The district 
is represented by the part "operation" because it 
puts the ideas it receives from the higher groups 
into operation ; the clubs work with the district 
so the "co" stands for the clubs. And what 
does the hyphen represent? The hyphen repre- 
sents the Federation secretaries whose joy and 
responsibility it is to make the connection be- 
tween the two. 

A very important part of our work is to bring 
unfederated clubs into the Federation — winning 
the other club. Eighteen clubs have joined the 
state and district, so far this year, making a total 
of two hundred and tw^enty-four clubs; sixteen 
clubs have joined the General Federation, mak- 
ing one hundred and fifty-two clubs now affil- 
iated with the general body. There are only 
sixty-eight more to be won before we will have 
universal membership. We are aiming for that, 
and it will come for "our highest hopes are the 
beginnings of their o'wn fulfillment." 

When I think of the loving service rendered 
by this department and by all other departments 
of the district, of the tremendous work done by 
the district president and officers, by club presi- 
dents and by club members I am minded of the 
words of Angela Morgan: 
"Work! 

Thank God for the might of it, 
The ardor, the urge, the delight of it — 
Work that springs from the heart's desire, 
Setting the brain and the soul on fire — 
Oh, what is so good as the heat of it, 
And what is so glad as the beat of it. 
And what is so kind as the stern command, 
Challenging brain and heart and hand? 

"Work! 

Thank God for the swing of it, 

For the clamoring, hammering ring of it, 

Passion of labor daily hurled 

On the mighty anvils of the world. 

Oh, what is so fierce as the flame of it? 

And what is so huge asi the aim of it ? 

Thundering on through dearth and doubt, 

Calling the plan of the Maker out. 

Work, the Titan ; Work, the friend, 

Shaping the earth to a glorious end. 

Draining the swamps and blasting the hills, 

Doing whatever the Spirit wills — 

Rending a continent apart. 

To answer the dream of the Master heart. 

Thank God for a world w^here none may shirk — 

Thank God for the splendor of work!" 




FRIDAY MORNING CLUB NOTES 

By Mrs. Viola Hickok, Press Chairman 
With the club year drawing to a close, a re- 
view of the programs show many persons of re- 
nown have been heard by the club this year, in 



Mrs. Peter Burke 
W ho took the character of the Princess of Pekin in the 
play 'A Thousand Years Ago," given Friday, April 9, 
by the Amateur Dramatic Club of the Friday Morn- 
ing Club. Photo by Witzel 

fact, more nationally and internationally known 
speakers than have ever been presented in any 
one year from the Friday Morning Club plat- 
form. 

We have had Sir John Adams and Lady 
Adams, of England ; also Brigadier General Lord 
Thompson, who was a member of the British 
Labor Cabinet ; Nancy M. Schonmaker, a lec- 
turer and author of international reputation, who 
spoke on "International Obligations of Ameri- 
can Women." 

Sherwood Anderson, who is intensely Amer- 
ican, and writes of American life, lectured on 
the subject "The Younger Generation." Then 
Dr. Lewis N. Chase, Ph. D. came to us direct 
from five years spent in the Orient observing its 
laws and customs, and spoke to the club on 
China. 

"The Mob and the Movies" was the subject 
chosen by Dr. Louis Anspacker, who had spoken 
before to the club on the subject "The Drama 
as a Social Force in a Democracy." 

James G. McDonald, chairman of the For- 
eign Policy Association, spoke on "The French 
Crisis" ; and Mark Sullivan, one of the foremost 
{Continued on Page 34) 



MAY, 1926 



Page 11 



woM Aw^ CLOB ofmwmooD 



REPORT OF CHILD WELFARE DEPARTMENT 1925-1926 
By Mary Hess Browrij M. D., Chairman 



Co-operation has been the keynote of the year's 
program of the Child Welfare Department of 
the Woman's Club of Hollywood. It hasn't 
been a case of letting just any "George do it," 
however, but of enlisting the best George who 
could do a particular job. The first one to be 
enlisted was the County Health Department, 
who loaned one of their child welfare workers, 
Dr. Mary H. Brown, a member of the club, for 
chairman of the department. 

Dr. Brown in turn enlisted the City Health 
Department. Dr. J. D. Dunshee, chief of the 
Division of Child Welfare, put a staff of nurses 
and doctors to men — and Women — a health cen- 
ter at the club. These, with some faithful vol- 
unteer workers, take care of the physical welfare 
of the children. Since October 250 infants, un- 
der two years, and 90 runabouts, two to six 
years, have been examined, some of them many 
times. Though some of these children had ail- 
ments, mostly nutritional, the large majority of 
the cases were preventive not curative. 

Mothers' conferences each week have present- 
ed well known speakers on health and educa- 
tional topics for children, though how to prevent 
baldness, not necessarily of infants either, and 
beauty lotions made an animated discussion for 
a noted skin specialist. The conferences are a 
clearing house for experiences and all kinds of 
information, with the speaker often keeping the 
bark from being wrecked on the banks of mis- 
information. One mother comes many miles 
each week and has missed but one conference. 
"The baby specialist makes my babies well, but 
these conferences help me keep them well," she 
says. 

A Child Welfare luncheon early in the club 
year got together many local authorities of 
Southern California; in fact, it was almost a reg- 
ister of Who's Who is Child Welfaredom. The 
principal speakers were Drs. Miriam Van 
Waters, Elizabeth Wood, E. V. Emery, Thomas 
Orbison, and W. M. Happ. The luncheon was 
unique in that both chairman and vice-chairman 
were unable to be present, and what at first 
looked like a start on the wrong foot developed 
into a free-for-all race with everybody helping, 
and the speakers and audience having one won- 
derful time. 

In the interest of good milk a pilgrimage of 
sixty club members was made to the Adohr 
Farms, producers of certified milk. 



The unique work of the Department has been 
the Nursery School. Mrs. Rebekah Earle, of 
the city schools, a graduate of the Merrill- 
Palmer School of Mothercraft, volunteered her 
services as director, and had over thirty run- 
abouts enrolled during the year. All children had 
physical examinations before entering the school, 
and through the co-operation of the Child Guid- 
ance Clinic, Miss Julia Mathews made mental 
tests of all the kiddies. The physical and 
mental reports gave Mrs. Earle information by 
which she has worked numerous health and de- 
portment problems of the individual child and 
the group. General health conditions in the 
city have interfered with the attendance of the 
school this spring. Yet, youngsters whose only 
mode of expressing affection for other tots was 
to "treat 'em rough" learned gentler ways, 
mother's and father's only child found how to 
adapt herself to other children, and oil learned 
how and why and to want to eat the things that 
are good for them. Miss Anne Raymond and 
Miss Julia Tappan, specialists in health educa- 
tion, rendered important service. The value of 
the work naturally was limited because of but 
one session a week, but it blazed the way in Los 
Angeles and laid the foundation for a much 
larger work which is being planned. The Junior 
Auxiliary of the club gave much of the equip- 
ment for the Nursery School and has helped 
Mrs. Earle in many ways. 

The health center has drawn from a large 
area, from Lankershim on the northwest to 
Huntington Park on the southwest; Beverly 
Hills, Burbank and Glendale have sent their 
children. Two outstanding cases are a Mex- 
ican-Greek baby who had gained only two ounces 
in her first eight weeks. Alicia looker like a 
shrivelled-up little old lady and was a tragic 
match for a baby boy who was a horrible ex- 
ample of malnutrition and rickets. Both now 
are the- prize babies of the Center. Such babies 
made happy and healthy, youngsters started in 
the right habits, and mothers better trained for 
the greatest job in the world are the best re- 
ward of the workers and the club. 

CLUB NOTES 
By Jessica B. Noble, Press Chairman 

As a further evidence of its interest in commu- 
nity affairs the Woman's Club of Hollywood has 



Page 12 



The CLUBWOMAN 



voted to completely furnish a double room in 
the new Hollywood Studio Club. This club 
was established for the benefit of girls employed 
in the motion picture industry. Its director, Miss 
Marjorie Williams, is film chairman of the 
Woman's Club of Hollywood. 

The board of directors has appointed the 
following club members as delegates to the con- 
vention of the California Federation of Women's 
Clubs at Riverside May 4, 5, 6: Mrs. Charles 
H. Richmond, Mrs. C.B. Cleveland, Mrs. Lo- 
ren B. Curtis, Mrs. C. H. Heard, Miss Jessica 
R. Noble, Miss ]\larv E. Hamlin, Mrs. W. H. 
Davies, Mrs. Maud D. Lee Skeen, Mrs. Jay F. 
Herrington, Mrs. L. M. Cutting, Mrs. George 
Blaisdell, Mrs. M. L. Stacy, Mrs. Lowell C. 
Frost, and Mrs. J. M. Davey. Alternates are: 
Mrs. J. C. Mordough, Mrs. H. Porter Fish, 
Mrs. Roy Cowper, Mrs. William P. Dawson, 
Miss Tessie Brown, Mrs. A. A. Hummel. Mrs. 
Charles Norton. Mrs. P. B. Chase, Mrs. George 
W. Eckert, Mrs. Ben Goodheart, Mrs. R. L. 
Gilliam, Miss F. M. Wills, and Mrs. F. W. 
Davey. 

Miss Jessica Lawrence, hospitality chairman, 
has been ably assisted during the past club year 
by her committee, Mrs. Edward C. Chamber- 
lin, Mrs. Pierce Baldwin, Mrs. F. W. Davev, 
Mrs. H. M. O'Malley, Mrs. A. S. Walther, 
Mrs. Harrv M. Haldeman, Miss Lula Maeyers, 
and Miss Jessie Andrews, and also by the fol- 
lowing club members: Mrs. Ethel Cowan, Mrs. 
C. B.^Andrews, Mrs. Maud Davis Baker, Mrs. 
R. T. Brown, Mrs. J. M. Hunter, Mrs. A. 
F. Libis, Mrs. E. R. Shrader, Miss Jessica B. 
Noble, Mrs. Harrv B. Washburn, Mrs. Charles 
L. Wilson, Mrs. B. F. Winsett, Mrs. Robert 
Young, Mrs. Fannie G. Woodside, Mrs. F. A. 
Brown, Mrs. P. M. Young, Mrs. G. H. A. 
Goodwin, Miss Mary E. Hamlin, Mrs. H. W. 
Hanson, Mrs. F. M. Douglas. Mrs. Donald P. 
Goodwin, Mrs. W. R. Goddard. Mrs. Kenneth 
Lees, Mrs. A. W. Jackson, Mrs. Arthur R. 
Kelly, Mrs. C. M. S. Alartz, Mrs. B. S. 
Phelos, Mrs. Henrv L. Tavlor, Mrs. Charles 
R. Van Tilburgh, Mrs. C. R. Welden, Mrs. 
William A. E. Noble, Mrs. W. H. Code, Mrs. 
F. C. Desmond, Mrs. Frederick Leonard, Mrs. 
B. F. Maurer, Mrs. J. W. Morgan, Mrs. C. E. 
Toberman, Mrs. C. Weston Clark, Mrs. A. R. 
Walker, Mrs. C. J. Eastman, Mrs. Claude A. 
Wayne, and Mrs. W. H. Davies. 

Many card parties have been enjoyed by club 
members and their friends. Mrs. Charles R. 
Baird, entertainment chairman, has been in 
charge of these parties which have been of finan- 
cial benefit to the club. Mrs. Baird's committee 
was composed of the following members: Mrs. 
H. A. Berkes, Mrs. David Morgan, Mrs. C. N. 
Rakestraw, Miss Jessie Andrews, Mrs. W. E. 



Clark, Mrs. Mulford Perry, Mrs. Ben Good- 
heart, Mrs. A. S. Walther, Mrs. Alfred Hen- 
derson, Mrs. P. J. Lauten," Mrs. Wesley Kin- 
ney, Mrs. W. G. Mason, Mrs. G. A. Hunter, 
Mrs. J. J. Scroggy, Mrs. Carl Bush, Mrs. 
Wayne Webster, Mrs. Robert Spensley, Mrs. 
E. F. Bodle, Mrs. E. A. Heyn, Mrs. Alexander 
McLaren, and Mrs. A. T. Harris. The last 
party of the club year will be a May fete to be 
held on Saturday, ]\Iay 15. 

All the members of the Shakespeare section 
have been taking part in the reading of the plays 
studied this club year under the chairmanship of 
Mrs. Leonard M. Cutting. Othello, the Temp- 
est, and the first part of King Henry IV have 
been read by the section, and the second part 
of King Henry IV will be completed at the two 
meetings in May. Active members of the sec- 
tion are: Mrs. Harlow Kimball, Mrs. Wilbur 
Mackenzie, Miss Pearl Whitmore, Miss Jes- 
sica B. Noble, Miss Mart E. Hamlin, Mrs. Rob- 
ert Fargo, Mrs. J. Klein, Miss Clara W. John- 
son, Mrs. A. Hvatt Smith, Mrs. Leo Galitzkie, 
Mrs. R. L. Gilliam, Mrs. F. A. Ballard, Mrs. 
Robert Elliott, Mrs. K. M. Whitham, Mrs. 
William Clark, Martha Fowlkes Haun, Mrs. 
John J. Millar, Mrs. M. L. Stacy, Mrs. James 
A. Bartlett, Mrs. F. A. Mudge, Miss Edith 
Pettibone, Mrs. Albert Wright, Mrs. Henry N. 
Adams, and Mrs. W. F. Turney. 

The last regular meetings of this club year 
vi^ill be held in May. The Luboviski Trio will 
give the program on Wednesday morning, May 
5, at 10:3. The trio is one of the finest in the 
\vest. Its members are Calmon Luboviski, vio- 
lin ; Misha Gegna, cello ; and Claire Mellonino, 
piano. 

On May 12 Ritza Freeman Reardon, story 
teller, and Enona Hopkins, harpist, will present 
a program. Mrs. Reardon possesses a rare ten- 
derness and dramatic feeling of interpretation, 
and intelling her stories she is able to bring to 
her audience all the beauty of the fairy tale,' all 
the romance of the French lore, the whimsy of 
Ireland and the mystic gloom of Russia. Mrs. 
Hopkins, a pupil of Tramonti, is one of the best 
known harpists in Southern California. She 
lives in Glendale. 

Lyman Llo^'d Bryson, A. M., will give a lec- 
ture on May 19 on the subject, "The Average 
Cittizen and Our Foreign Affairs." Mr. Bryson 
is a lecturer, author, and a former director of 
the International Red Cross. He is a graduate 
of the University of Michigan, and was on the 
faculty there at a later time. His contact with 
international affairs and personalities has pro- 
vided him with his most interesting lecture ma- 
terial. 

On May 26, the last regular club meeting of 
the year, a group of one act plays from the 



MAY, 1926 



Page 13 



Holh'wood Community Studio of The Theatre 
will be presented under the direction of Miss 
Neely Dickson. Miss Dickson is Drama chair- 
man of the club, and has been director of the 
Hollywood Community Theatre for eight 
years. 

The annual Browning luncheon will be held 
on May 5, when Mrs. H. Porter Fish, chairman 
of the Browning section, will preside. The prin- 
cipal speaker is Dr. Charles F. Aked, and his 
subject is "The Brownings — Robert and Eliza- 
beth: An Irresponsible Tribute." The musical 
program will be given by Merle Wolfe Reg- 
nier, soprano ; Altha Montague, contralto ; 
Louise Ingersoll, accompanist ; and a child harp- 
ist, Ann Mason. 

The Literature luncheon on May 12 \v'\\\ be 
presided over by Mrs. Charles H. Richmond, 
president of the club, in the absence of the chair- 
man, Mrs. Orville Routt. The speakers are Dr. 
Dorothea Moore, Mrs. Mabel Wing Castle, and 
Mrs. Andrew S. Lobingier. 

Mrs. Lowell C. Frost, chairman of Educa- 
tion, will be in charge of the annual Education 
luncheon on May 19. Mrs. Susan Dorsey will 
speak on "The Opportunity of Parents for Co- 
operation with the Schools." Mrs. Frost, in 
announcing the luncheon, said, "Mrs. Dorsey, 
our superintendent of schools, has a message for 
parents which means much for our girls and 
boys. 

The Hollywood Woman's Club Chorus will 
hold a luncheon on May 26, with Mrs. Maud D. 
Lee Skeen, chairman, presiding. The program 
will consist of a group of songs by the chorus, 
community, singing led by Hugo Kirchhofer 
talks by Squire Coop, Dean of Music of the 
University of California in Hollywood, and 
Mrs. Hector Geiger, and pianologues by Frieda 
Peycke. The chorus will give its spring concert 
on Friday evening, June 4, in the auditorium of 
the club. 

The annual club luncheon will be held at the 
Biltmore Hotel on Wednesday, June 2, at 1 
o'clock. New officers of the club will be in- 
stalled at this time. As there is only one can- 
didate for each office the following are assured 
of election on May 5: President, Mrs. Orville 
L. Routt; first vice-president, Mrs. Alfred L. 
Bartlett; second vice-president, Mrs. Harry Han- 
son; third vice-president, Mrs. Francis A. 
Blackburn; curator, Mrs. William Barnhart ; 
recording secretary, Miss Mary E. Hamlin ; 
corresponding secretary, Mrs. Loren B. Curtis; 
treasurer, Mrs. C. H. Heard ; directors for two 
year term, Mrs. Edward C. Chamberlin and 
Miss Jessica M. Lawrence; director for one year 
term, Mrs. Willsie Martin. Mrs. Gavin With- 
erspoon and Mrs. Margaret Muller continue in 
office another year as directors, having been 
elected last year for the two year term. 



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Page 14 



The CLUBWOMAN 



THE WOMEN'S UNIVERSITY CLUB 

By Iva B. Duer, Press Chairman 



As the club season draws to a close, it must 
be with satisfaction that the officers and direc- 
tors, who have sponsored the broad activity of 
the club, view the year in retrospect. True to 
the plan announced at the beginning of the sea- 
son, programs have been scheduled on definite 
mornings, afternoons and evenings of the month, 
followed or preceded by luncheon, tea or din- 
ner. Surely no member failed to find some point 
or line of interest each month. 

The club house at 943 South Hoover Street 
has given a social atmosphere to all the club ac- 
tivities. To those most socially minded there 
has been the evening of dance and cards. The 
Sunday tea has given an opportunity for a pleas- 
ant and informal get-together, and at the same 
time has offered programs by artists of great 
merit. The West Washington and Holljavood- 
Beverly Hills sections have continued their ac- 
tivity and interest through the year. The Mu- 
sic, Drama and Literature sections and the In- 
ternational Relations Round Table have proven 
of real interest. A new group has been formed 
this year — the Pre-School Age Survey Study 
Group — for study along the lines suggested by 
the name of the group. 

The April calendar maintained the high stand- 
ard set by the calendars of the preceding months. 

At the Saturday luncheon. Miss Jean Schoen 
gave an illustration lecture upon the subject — 
"The White Man's Grave." Miss Schoen with 
true explorer's spirit visited the West Coast of 
Africa, traveling alone and determining her itin- 
erary as she went. She gave in this lecture some 
of her experiences and observations and illus- 
trated it with pictures taken by herself. 

At the Thursday dinner, R. D. Shepard (R. 
D. McLean, Father Junipero Serra of the Mis- 
sion Play) gave a three part program of inter- 
pretative Shakespeare readings in honor of the 
birthday month of the great dramatist. 

Part 1 — Seven Ages of Man from "As You 
Like It." 

Part II — Hamlet's Soliloquy. 

Part III — Scene from "Merchant of Venice." 

He was assisted by David Henderson, Howard 
McNear, and Mrs. William De Shiells at the 
piano. 

The Shepards have been giving the Shakes- 
peare Festival series at the Biltmore Hotel, 
which had for a fitting climax a Shakespeare Fes- 
tival April 23, the birthday of the dramatist. 

At the Tuesday luncheon. Miss Mary E. 
Woolley was the speaker-guest of honor. Miss 
Woolley has been president of Mt. Holyoke 



College for the past quarter of a century. She 
is a noted speaker and worker in social service. 
The Women's University's Club is to be con- 
gratulated that they have an opportunity to 
honor this noted educator during her stay in 
Southern California. 

•At the Sunday tea of March 29, Homer Sim- 
mons was the artist for the month. His pro- 
gram featuring the music of MacDowell and 
Carpenter was interesting and gave great pleas- 
ure. He combines with a marvelous technique 
the delicacy and feeling so necessary for the in- 
terpretation . of MacDowell. The following 
program by Sol Cohn, violinist, and Wells 
Hively, pianist, featured the Sunday tea of April. 
First Group : 

1. Dirge of the North Blaugh Kreider 

2. Pantomime _ Mozart 

3. French Folk Song Monsigny 

4. Hungarian Rhapsody Hauser 

Second group consists of original composition by 
Sol Cohn : 

1. Flames. 

2. Hob Goblin. 

3. Mirage. 

4. Spain. 

5. Concert Waltz. 

The West Washington section me at the home 
of Mrs. James H. Woods and her daughter, 
Mrs. S. H. Dunlap. Miss Nellie Small, Mrs. 
G. O. Carlson, and Mrs. M. P. Hamilton were 
joint hostesses. Mrs. Wendell Ward was the 
leader. After the informal, get-acquainted half 
hour, an hour of music was presented by Mme. 
Irwin Kellogg. 

The following program was given : 
Duet: 

Passage Birds Farell Hildach 

Misses Vaughn and Duncan 

Berceuse Godard 

Mrs. G. H. Nicholson 

Caro Mio Ben Giordani 

Miss Sue Duncan 
Five Minute Talk: 

"Deep Breathing for Better Speech" 

-Mme. Irwin Kellogg 

Swiss Echo Song Eckert 

Miss Eunice Vaughn 

Amorerjs Song De Koven 

Fred Harter 
Mme. Kellogg, originator of the short course 
in deep breathing and enunciation for club wom- 
en, known as silent singing, has recently begun 
large classes in this work in her studio in the 
Friday Morning Clubhouse and at other clubs. 
(Continued on Page 3+) 



MAY, 1926 



Page 15 



THE SOROPTIMIST CLUB OF LOS ANGELES 

By Alice Mavor Edwards, Secretary 



The scholarships which \ve are maintaining in 

the University of California, our greatest serv- 
ice objective this year, have been definitely 
named. The first three for our first three presi- 
dents, the Oda Faulconer, the Mary Jean Hen- 
ley and the Gertrude C. A'laynard scholarships 
were named by our Board of Directors. By 
popular vote at our next business meeting we 
voted to name the other three for Delia H. Hub- 
bard, Lx)uise Helen Kramer and Lillian M.- 
Grandmason. These are all charter members and 
have entered loyally into every club activity from 
the beginning of our organization. Delia Hub- 
bard was one of our first board of directors, and 
has had in charge our very popular birthday 
celebrations. She has made elaborate plans for 
our Spring Frolic to be held on next month at 
the Biltmore, when every one "lets down" and 
plays a part. Louise Helen Kramer has always 
been associated in the club with flowers. She 
herself furnishes the decorations for the club 
luncheons, and the vases themselves are her gift 
to the club. "Flowers," she says, "speak a uni- 
versal language and I should like best to be re- 
membered as being associated with them." Lil- 




Alice Mavor Edwards 

Secretary of the Soroptimist Club, 

Editor of the Soroptimist 



The Los Angeles 

Elizabeth oArden 

Salon 

<with 

J. W. ROBINSON CO. 

UNDER the direct management of 
Miss Arden and her New York staff 
and offering the same specialized treat- 
ments that have made Miss Arden's other 
salons internationally known. 

SEVENTH FLOOR 




Page 16 



The CLUBfVOMAN 




Dr. Delta H. Hubbard 





Dr. Lillian M . Grandmason 



Louise Helen Kramer 

Members of Soroptimist Club for whom scholarships in the University of California, Southern Branch, have 

been named 



lian M. Grandmason was a member of the board 
of directors for two years, and brought us es- 
pecial notice when as Major of the Community 
Chest last year she brought us away over the 
top. She is advertising manager for The Sorop- 
timist and made it possible for us to put on a 
double number with complete roster for our 
Style Show vv'ith a profit of more than $50 for 
the one edition. We feel that we are very well 
represented in this popular vote and are proud 
to show the pictures of our scholarship nominees. 

Our president, Mrs. Gertrude C. Maynard, 
attended the St. Louis convention of Girl Scouts 
in the capacity of regional director and member 
of the national committee. We have to share 
her with many activities, but she brings so much 
enthusiasm for many good things with her on 
her return that we feel we have good interest 
from our loan of her. Just now we are being 
importuned for shirts, the plain garden variety 
that men wear, discarded ones which do not have 
to have cuffs nor collars to make them useful to 
the Girl Scouts who manufacture clever and ar- 
tistic little girl dresses out of them. They do 
not have to be all Soroptimist shirts either, so if 
any Clubwoman readers have them and can de- 
liver them washed and ironed, if you please, to 



426 West Sixth Street, they will swell our ex- 
hibit later. We hope to have a stack mountain 
high before the drive is over. 

The district convention found a solid, dozen 
of our group enjoying every session and the re- 
ports gave us all a definite picture of the field of 
accomplishment. They demonstrated that one 
can really get the most out of a convention when 
one sees it in the large, and enters into the full 
spirit of it. We are expecting to send a large 
delegation to Riverside in May. 

We are to have a Cadman program on May 
18 at the Biltmore which will be broadcast 
through KHJ at 12:30 p. m. This will be our 
President's Day and we hope to have many of 
our Federation officers and friends with us on 
that day. 

Our press chairman, Bertha M. Just, who was 
absent for several months because of serious ill- 
ness is back again, and we are happy to welcome 
her. It is because of her efforts in "press agent- 
ing," and those of K. Anthanette Foster in col- 
lecting and mounting the press clippings that the 
Soroptimist Club has been honored by being one 
of the four clubs chosen from the many at the 
district convention to have press clipping books 
displayed at the state convention. 



MAY, 1926 



Page 17 






Airs. Florence Dodson Schoneman, who has just 
been re-elected president of the California His- 
tory and Landmarks' Club. Mrs. Schoneman 
is attired in a Spanish costume in which she ap- 
peared recently at an affair given by the Friday 
Alorning Club 



The Sweater Costume 

for smart and 
practical sportswear 




Bullocks 

Broadway— Hill 
and— SeventrN^ 

"One o'clock, ^^atardayij" 



Fage 18 



The CLUBfVOMJN 



LONG BEACH EBELL CLUB 



The Long Beach Ebell is nearing the end of 
a very successful club year under the leadership 
of the president, Mrs. Charles A. Wiley, whose 
knowledge of Federation and club work has been 
gained through years of service on both district 
and State Federation boards, the experience be- 
ing invaluable. Through the changing of by- 
lawrs the business management of the club has 
been materially aided, one by-law in particular 
having been changed to read : 

'Tailure to pay annual dues by May 1 shall 
constitute forfeiture of membership." 

Under the old by-law delinkuent members 
were carried over into the next year with the 
privilege of having their names printed in the 
Year Book and were considered members until 
the third meeting in October, when they were 
dropped from the membership list for non-pay- 
ment of dues. This arrangement made it dif- 
ficult to know the exact membership of the club, 
yet Federation dues were paid on the number 
listed in the directories of the District and State, 
regardless of whether the number was in excess 
of the correct number or as near correct as could 
be ascertained under this by-law. Under the new 
ruling an accurate account can be made at the 
end of each club year. 

Sociability was greatly needed at the begin- 
ning of this club year and in order to bring the 
members together and become acquainted, the 
club held open house once a week through the 
summer months and at the opening of club in 



October weekly luncheons were given on club 
days promoting friendliness and good fellowship 
and holding the members for the afternoon pro- 
grams. These luncheons have done much to stim- 
ulate club interest and have been most popular 
and beneficial. 

The club membership is divided into twenty 
groups under the supervision of a most able 
chairman of ways and means, Mrs. R. J. Booth, 
and these groups have reduced the club debt 
$10,000 this club year by giving luncheons, din- 
ners, dancing parties, card parties, musicals, 
fashion shows, theatre parties, cooked food sales, 
etc., and much credit is due these loyal women 
for their splendid co-operation. 

A new venture was undertaken this year for 
financial returns, that of promoting an excursion 
to Honolulu and the chairman of this "Blossom- 
Time Excursion to Hawaii," Mrs. H. F. Bur- 
mester, has successfully put over this project 
and the party will sail May 12 with the presi- 
dent, Mrs. Charles A. Wiley, heading the ex- 
cursion. In promoting this excursion Ebell has 
not only advertised the club but the city of Long 
Beach as well and has placed before the public 
this new idea for a woman's club to undertake. 

The programs this year have been of the high- 
est type. Roy Chapman Andrews lectured on 
"The Newest Search for the Oldest Man;" 
Maurice G. Hindus lectured on "The Russian 
Peasant ;" Thurlow and Edna Lieurance in lec- 
ture recital, the Zoellner Quartette, Dr. Herbert 



TRUSTWORTHY FIRMS 



It is with pleasure that THE CLUBWOMAN recommends to the patronage of mem- 
bers of women's clubs the Nurseries and Florists whose announcements appear on this page. 



NEW BULB CATALOGUE 

for 1924-25 now ready for distribution. It 
is free and a post card or telephone call 
will bring it immediately. 

Morris & Snow Seed Co., Inc. 

Established 1905 

853 So. San Pedro Street 

Telephone Main 3530 

LOS ANGELES CALIFORNIA 


Howard & Smith 

NURSERYMEN AND LANDSCAPE 
ARCHITECTS 

Phone 877-541 Ninth and Olive Sts. 

Design and Decorating TRinity 
a Specialty 7541 


TUcker 2693 Phones TUcker 5467 

WRIGHT'S 


SEEDS 

Headquarters for Farm and Garden 

Ornamental Plants, Shrubs and Trees 

WINSEL-GIBBS SEED CO. 

The Old Reliable Seed House 

of Los Angeles 

Main Store, 2 1 1 S. Main St. 

Phone VAndike 9532 

Nursery Yard Forty-ninth and Main 


Flower Shop Fourth St. 
224 West Fourth St. r,o» Angeles, Cal. 



MAY, 1926 



Page 19 



Willette and Mme. Pearl Metzelthin were some 
of the entertainers. Much credit is due the chair- 
man of program, Mrs. G. H. Galbraith, and 
much satisfaction has been voiced by the club 
members and by the public, for the public may 
attend the club programs by paying a small fee. 

The eleven departments of the club have ac- 
complished much this year and have been most 
satisfactor\' as to educational value. 

The Long Beach Ebell had the honor and the 
pleasure of entertaining the February Presidents' 
Council with one thousand women in attendance 
and the club members served luncheon to seven 
hundred. 

The Long Beach Ebell has extended an invi- 
tation to entertain the next district convention in 
April, 1927, when a cordial welcome will await 
Los Angeles District. 



EBELL NOTES 

By Ruth Brisbin Curry, Assistant Press Chairman 
The Ebell Club of Long Beach at its reg- 
ular Monday program on April 12 was inter- 
estingly entertained by Branson De Cou who 
presented "Dream Pictures of the Mediterranean 
Wonderland." The slides used by Mr. De Cou 
were four inches in size and were carefully col- 
ored from nature by Augusta A. Heyler of New- 
ark, N. J., who accompanied Mr. and Mrs. De 
Cou on their tour last summer. 



There was a two-fold allure in the scenes 
shown, as many of the pictures were thrown on 
the screen to the accompaniment of classical mu- 
sic. To the spell of the Moorish dream of power 
and beauty set in the hills of Spain centuries 
ago, majestic, romantic, splendid in its desola- 
tion, the Alhambra, was added that of the music 
of "Goyescas" (Granados). The journey along 
the French Riviera was accompanied by De- 
bussy's "Arabeshque No. 1." The beauty of 
Florence grew more rich and sweet under the 
"Melodie D Minor" (Gluck-Sgambati), and Ne- 
vin's "Venetian Love Song," with chimes har- 
monized with the romantic beauty of Venice. 
Balakirew's "Islamey," an Oriental fantasy, was 
the tone color which formed the background for 
glimpses of Athens, Constantinople, Baalbek and 
Damascus. The Holy Land, studies of Egypt, 
the hill towns of Italy and fairylike Capri con- 
tinue the "Dream of the Mediterranean" to the 
music of "Trinity Chimes," "Barcarolle," (Ru- 
binstein), and Kamennoi-Ostrow" (Rubinstein.) 

The most important of the business of the aft- 
ernoon was the election of delegates for the state 
convention, California Federation of Women's 
Clubs, wihich will be held in Riverside early in 
May. Delegates chosen in addition to the Pres- 
ident, Mrs. Charles A. Wiley, were: Mmes. H. 
W. Spratt, June MacNee Hanson, Sumner 
Davis, J. W. Avery, W. O. Fleming, Gertrude 




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Table d' Hole Luncheons, 60c to 75c 
Table d' Hote Dinners, $L00 to $1.50. 
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Style 
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KLING MANUFACTURING CO. 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 



Page 20 



The CLUBWOMAN 



Bird Holt, Charles Allen, O. M. Healey, M. E. 
Elston, S. C. Dalton and O. G. Hinshaw. Al- 
ternates elected are: Mmes. James K. Reid, Earl 
Burns Miller, Alena B. Dillman, Jonah Jones, 
B. P. Davman, Charles F. Ross, A. J. Langer, 
L. W. Stiil, Charles Pugh, Frank O. Nelson and 
Dan Bone. 

Mrs. J. Robert Poor, parliamentarian, gave 
notice of intention to present a by-law amend- 
ment by which the number of the members of 
the board of directors may be increased or de- 
creased within the limits of the corporation law. 

Mrs. G. H. Galbraith, program chairman, an- 
nounced a musicale next Monday by Miss Eliza- 
beth O'Neil, brilliant young pianist, and Mrs. 
Ada Potter Wiseman, popular soloist. 



LOS ANGELES AUDUBON 
SOCIETY 

Report of Field Day 
By Miss Cora Bassett 

Verdugo Woodlands was the spot chosen for 
the month of April field day of the Los Angeles 
Audubon Society and the day falling on the first 
day of April gave old Mother Nature or the 
weather man a chance to play pranks on us. All 
the same, despite clouds, a goodly number came 
out to this little bit of heaven to get better ac- 
quainted with our friends of the feathers. All 
popular varieties of birds such as are to be seen 
in deep wooded places were present and ready for 
inspection. The Towhees kept on with their 
scratching, the Nuttall Woodpecker gave a dem- 
onstration on how easy it was to climb up the 
trunk of a tree, and the Song Sparrow, a prima 
donna of bird singers, filled our hearts with joy 
as we listened to his sweet, low song. Though 
the clouds hung low over the green Verdugo 
hills like veils of chiffon, the Mocking Bird, 
Gambels Sparrows, the Black Phoebe and other 
birds could be heard mingling their voices with 
the ripple of the stream by the roadside. 

Many beautiful varieties of shrubs and 
flowers so interested us that we found we were 
learning "who was who" amongst them as well 
as with the birds. The calla lilies planted along 
the stream formed a regular Easter parade. It 
seemed a veritable paradise for birds with flow- 
ers, running water, bugs to eat and building ma- 
terial close at hand, but they have their troubles 
as well as mankind ; for one of those bird band- 
its, the Shrike, was hanging around looking for 
some poor victim to hold up and take his life. 
While in this vicinity we paid a visit to the old 
Verdugo Rancho where stands the famous Cali- 
fornia Live Oak, a landmark of old Spanish 
days. Not far from this tree General Pio Pico 
pitched his camp and near it a treaty of capitula- 
tion between General Fremont and Don Jesus 
representing the American side, and Captain J. 
A. Carrillo and Honorable Augustin Olivero, 



the California or Spanish, was signed on Janu- 
ary 13, 1847. The American Forestry Associa- 
tion has established a Hall of Fame for Trees 
in Washington, D. C. No tree is recorded with- 
out a historical record. This live oak was en- 
tered by Mrs. F. T. Bicknell in the name of the 
Los Angeles Audubon Society, when she was its 
president, and an account of it was published in 
"American Forests and Forest Life Magazine" 
for August, 1924. It is a beautiful and sym- 
metrical tree especially now in its fresh green 
Easter foliage. The ladies stood leaning against 
the tree facing outward, with shoulders touch- 
ing, and it took sixteen to circle this giant which, 
probably, is several hundred years old. Sud- 
denly it started to rain and this was no April 
fool as there was quite a shower, enough to warn 
us to seek shelter, so we were glad to accept the 
generous hospitality of a dear lady living near 
by, and as the garage doors were invitingly open 
we quickly turned our field trip into a barn 
party. With the aid of tables and chairs from 
the arbor we soon had an impromptu banquet 
spread and proceeded to "stoke up." 

Mrs. Estelle D. Dyke, who had charge of the 
after dinner program gave us a lot for our 
money. First some very delightful true bird 
stories were told by one of our visitors, Mrs. 
Ramsey. Then from a big box Mrs. Dyke pro- 
duced quite a number of bird's nests and ex- 
ploited them for us; they were of many styles 
and shapes, quite as varied as the architecture 
of Los Angeles ; some looked as though built by 
cheap contractors, the twigs and branches merely 
thrown together, while others showed much care 
and neatness, evidently constructed by those who 
worked by the day. More nests from Mrs. 
Hall's collection were passed around, inspected, 
and commented upon, after which Mrs. Dyke 
brought forth from another big box a large col- 
lection of bird skins, duplicates of some we had 
seen in the flesh with the aid of binoculars and 
of some we might have seen had the day been 
fair. Miss Anna Byrnes read the list of names 
of eighteen varieties of birds seen that morn- 
ing, after which little Miss Phylis Green recited 
a bird piece which brought forth much applause. 



YOU CAN SLEEP SAFELY ON 

KWALITY PILLOWS 

THEY ARE MADE OF 

ALL NEW FEATHERS 

Thoroughly sterilized by our own process. 
INSIST ON 

KWALITY PILLOWS 

Made in Los Angeles 



MAY, 1926 



Page 21 




~.0^^^*- 






Carmel by the Sea and Point Lobos. By William Ritschel, N. A. 
This is from the Harrison gallery, Los Angeles Museum 



ACCESSORIES are the seasonings of the costume without 
which taste falls flat. 

Coulter's always show the newest and will be glad to assist 
you in selecting. 




SEVENTH STREET AT OLIVE 



Page 22 



The CLUBWOMAN 



Mrs. Schneider told of a book-shelf in the new 
Girls' Camp in Griffith Park and solicited addi- 
tions to the books already donated. Before bid- 
ding our hostess adieu and thanking her for her 
kind hospitality, we went to the front of the 
house to see the Butcher's nest built in a tree and 
almost overhanging the door. I am sure we all 
carried away with us a very pleasant memory of 
a day well spent. 



HIGHLAND PARK EBELL 
CLUB 

By Mrs. George F. Cook 

Mrs. Harry E. Fisher, who has given a course 
of lectures on music throughout the year that 
has been highly appreciated by the Music sec- 
tion of Highland Park Ebell Club, presented a 
morning program before the club that demon- 
strated the work of the children of the Los An- 
geles Music School Settlement with Miss Anne 
McPherson, director. Madame Emma Loef- 
fler de Zaruba, president of the School Settle- 
ment Association, spoke ardently of the desire to 
promote culture by beginning with the children. 
Several teachers from the school were present 
with a chorus of little folks and several promis- 
ing soloists were among them. Exhibition of sing- 
ing, piano and violin music and folk dancing 
were given and revealed splendid training. 

The "Poetry of Science and Religion" was 
forcibly illustrated in a recent lecture by Dr. B. 
R. Baumgardt, in which selections from Char- 
lotte Stetson Gilman, Victor Hugo, Words- 
worth, Joseph Addison, Matthew Arnold and 
others were given. 

A review of the district convention was given 
by the delegates, Mrs. E. M. Kromer, Mrs. G. 
F. Cook and Mrs. D. A. Alcock with additional 
reports by the president, Mrs. Herbert Carr also 
Mrs. O. J. Swegles on the prizes awarded for 
Federation News,, Mrs. H. L. Stroh on Dr. 
Sibley's address, "Discovering the Soul of Amer- 
ica," and Mrs. W. W. Slayden on the "Spiritual 
Side of the Convention." 

Miss Nora Sterry, principle of Macy Street 
School and editor of the Los Angeles Public 
School Journal, gave an address on Americaniza- 
tion in April made doubly interesting by the pres- 
ence of some of the pupils from the school. The 
address was one of two presented by Mrs. John 
H. Foley, chairman for Public Affairs E)ay, the 



other being on Conservation and Reforestation 
by Mr. Francis M. Fultz, instructor in the For- 
estry Division of the Los Angeles Public 
Schools. 

Shakespeare section, of which Mrs. C. W. 
Foote is curator, and Mrs. Lois B. Knowlton is 
assistant, presented Frayne Williams at the last 
April morning session. Mr. Williams of the 
dramatic department of Southern Branch, U. C, 
and director of the Literary Theatre, gave an 
intensely interesting lecture on "Shakespeare 
Through Elizabethan Eyes." An appropriate 
piano duet from Henry VHI was delightfully 
played bv Miss Elizabeth Ewing and Mrs. Ruth 
Towne Smith, talented members of the club. 

Another talented pianist of the month was 
Miss Phyllis Worsley, w'ho gave a masterful 
rendition of Mendelssohn's "Rondo Capricioso" 
and "Valcik" by Nokrejs, as an encore. 

Mrs. Dan Hammack, curator of the Litera- 
ture section, presented two speakers after the 
monthly luncheon on April 6. Mrs. Samuel 
Weston Hastings reviewed J. Smeaton Chase's 
"Our Araby" and "The Cone Bearing Trees of 
California" and Mrs. Robert Northcross, dean 
of w^omen, Santa Ana Junior College, who gave 
careful and appreciative survey of California lit- 
erature. 

A successful and beautiful card party was 
given recently by the Ways and Means commit- 
tee, Mrs. W. b. Bird and Mrs. Herbert E. 
Owens, serving as chairmen. 

A rare treat was the garden party given on a 
glorious day in the shade of the trees and per- 
golas at the home of the curator of the Rambler 
section, Mrs. Samuel Weston Hastings, 130 
South Avenue 56. It was a children's luncheon 
and the members, over one hundred, vied with 
one another in their beautiful and clever cos- 
tumes. Several created a sensation by wearing 
becoming male attire. "Mother Hastings" 
served a M^onderful luncheon. Mina Sloane 
Snell read an original poem dedicated to Mrs. 
Hastings. Children's games were enjoyed and 
little readings and songs added to the happy 
time. 

The Ramblers were guests of Miss Jeanette 
L. Hazel at Sunset Canyon Country Club on 
April 28. 

The Art exhibit for April, was by Jean Mann- 
heim and were presented through the courtesy 
of the Art chairman, Mrs. W. L. Judson. 



HUNT£i2,DaL(N 6 Co. 



San Francisco 



Santa Barbara 



Los Angeles 



Oakland 



GOVERNMENT, MUNICIPAL. DISTRICT AND CORPORATION BONDS 



San Diego 



MAY, 1926 



Page 23 



CALIFORNIA HISTORY AND 
LANDMARKS CLUB 

By Mrs. E. M. Timerhoff 

Including Miss E. J. Quinn, Mrs. B. S. Bout- 
tier and Mrs. E. C. Rodin, the nominating com- 
mittee for the California History and Landmarks 
Club brought in a ticket to the April session- — 
the 15th — that was acted upon unanimously, and 
replaced and placed officers for the ensuing year 
as follows: President, Mrs. Florence Dodson 
Schoneman; first vice president, Mrs. E. M. 
Timerhoff; second vice president, Mrs. A. F. 
Wilmot ; recording secretary, Mrs. Catherine A. 
O'Brien; corresponding secretary, Mrs. J. A. 
Corbett ; treasurer, Mrs. F. A. Brannen ; direc- 
tors, Mrs. A. S. C. Forbes and Mrs. J. X. Mc- 
Donald. The installation will be a feature of 
the May session, the 20th, when a fiesta will be 
held in the patio of the Ebell, members and their 
guests attending. 

Program features for the 15th embraced re- 
ports of the district convention by the press chair- 
man as delegate and Mrs. J. A. Allred alter- 
nate ; a talk on the Music Settlement by Madame 
Elmma Loeffler de Zaruba ; and the presentation 
of the Battle of Montebello, by Mrs. G. A. Wil- 
fert of Montebello's Woman's Club, which had 
been postponed. 

Beside the president, Mrs. F. D. Schoneman, 
Mrs. A. S. C. Forbes, and delegates, at the con- 
vention, Mrs. F. A. Brannen, Mrs. J. X. Mc- 
Donald, and Mrs. Webb were in attendance. 
Reports of Mrs. Forbes and Mrs. Schoneman 
placed the California History and Landmarks 
Club as an active factor in Federation work. 
Dr. Mariana Bertola has appointed Mrs. Schone- 
man a member of the program committee for the 
state convention at Riverside next month. Mrs. 
Schoneman spoke at the community service din- 
ner at the Men's City Club April 12 and at a 
special session in San Pedro, of the Native Sons 
and Daughters. 

Miss Mary Rhodes will be the president's ap- 
pointee at Riverside. Mrs. Catherine O'Brien and 
Miss Eloise Forman will act as delegates. 



WEDNESDAY MORNING CLUB 

Pauline E. Olson, Press Chairman 

The month of April will long be remembered 
by Wednesday Morning Club as we were hon- 
ored by a visit from our district president, Mrs. 
James Birney Lorbeer, who gave a most inter- 
esting and inspirational address. Two of the 
things she said stand out especially clear in the 
memory "Attainment comes only through con- 
scious effort," the other, a slogan for all club 




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baths in a cool fragrant lather 
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Mission Bell Soap 




Los Angeles Soap Company 
Makers of White King 



Page 24 



The CLUBWOMAN 




Morning, by Boucher 



*> ~^ ,"'>■•'■■ 




Night, by Boucher 



MJY, 1926 



Page 25 



women, a wonderful objective, "To advance the 
world to perfection just as far as our strength 
and power will permit." 

The social event of the month was an old 
fashioned box social given on Saturday night, 
April 17, under the auspices of the Music sec- 
tion. The affair was modernized with dancing, 
bridge and five-hundred and proved to be a very 
successful evening, due to the efforts of the two 
hostesses, Mrs. Suppe and Mrs. Richert, and 
their assistants. 

One of the cleverest performances ever given 
at the club was presented on the afternoon and 
evening of April 20 by the Current Events sec- 
tion. A play called "Passing the Political Pill 
Box," a good-natured take off on the Woman's 
City Club written and directed by Berenice 
Johnson, instructor of the section. 

Shakespeare's birthday was observed with a 
special program arranged by the Shakespeare sec- 
tion during the lunch hour on April 21. Mrs. 
S. B. Welcome was mistress of ceremonies and 
called on different members for toasts and re- 
sponses apropos of the occasion. Mrs. Marian 
Phillips, director of the section, presented every 
one with a place card on which was a picture of 
the bard also also a quotation "He was not of 
an age but for all time." 

The club sent its delegates to the district con- 
vention at Pasadena and they came back with 



glowing accounts of a wonderful time, inspired 
with new zeal and loyalty for their club. 



GLEASON PARLIAMENTARY 
CLUB 

By Mrs. T. R. Murc/iison 

The Gleason Parliamentary Club met last .it 
the Friday Morning Club House on Saturday, 
April 24. Membership examination was held at 
10 a. m. ; directors meeting at 11 a. m. ; parlia- 
mentary practice at 1 p. m. and regular meet- 
ing at 2 p. m. Mrs. M. D. Yale conducted the 
parliamentary practice and Mrs. J. A. Johnson 
addressed, the club on a proposed legislative 
amendment, while Mrs. Inez Parmalee had 
charge of the American Citizenship feautre. 

Our president, Mrs. Leon W. Umstead, and 
one delegate, in spite of the rain, attended the 
district convention at Pasadena and reported 
most interesting programs at all sessions of the 
convention. 

On account of her health, Mrs. A. H. Huber 
has been compelled to resign as corresponding 
secretary of the club. It is earnestly hoped by 
all members of the club that she will be speedily 
restored to her usual health and able to resume 
her usual duties. 



ffkh 3C 

You can Overcome The 

Handicaps To Skin and Hair 

of the Hard Alkali Water in 

This Country. 

3C is the Modern, Conven- 
ient City Equivalent To 
Putting Out a Wash Tub To 
Catch Rain Water For a 
Shampoo. 







COMFORT 



Also Means 

CLEANLINESS 



You Can Buy 3C At These 

Places— 

LOS ANGELES 

A. & O. 

Broadway Department Store 

The May Co. 

HOLLYWOOD 

Carty Bros. 

FLINTRIDGE 

Flintridge Grocery Co. 

BEVERLY HILLS 

R. P. O'Connor 

PASADENA 

F. C. Nash Co. 

The Model Grocery 

LONG BEACH 

The Wall Co. 

RIVERSIDE 

C. F. Elder 

Alfred M. Lewis 

Sweet Grocery Co. 



CHARM 



If you will use 3C in the water whenever you wash, your friends from the East can no longer 
say "This water is dreadfully hard on your skin, isn't it. my dear?" 

It is a perfect water softener and can be used with your favorite soap for bath or shampoo. 
A little in a glass of water absolutely cleans your rings. 

You Can Buy 3C At These Places 



SAN BERNARDINO 

McNeil's Grocery 

Golden Rule 

Bates Grocery 

ARCADIA 

Shular Bros, 



MONTROSE 
Hoffman- Fowler 

MONROVIA 

Kellar Grocery Co. 

SIERRA MADRE 

T. Salury 



ALTADENA 
Altadena Grocery Store 

TORRENCE 
Paige's 

WATTS 
G. J. Burger 



MONETA 

R. W. Ahlberg 

GLENDALE 

All Grocery Storea 

COLTON 

Magills 

Burton-Powell Co. 



Page 26 



The CLUBWOMAN 




EDUCATIONAL NOTES 

By Jean B. Kentle 

Typical of the Fine Specimens of Manhood Developed at the San Diego Army 

and Navy Academy. The well balanced curriculum with unusual opportunities 

for outdoor sports keeps the cadets mentally and physically fit. 



HEADMISTRESSES' ASSOCIATION MEETS 
The semi-annual meeting of the Headmistresses' 
Association of the Pacific Coast was concluded re- 
cently at the Fairmont Hotel, San Francisco. Matters 
pertaining to the interests of girls' schools of this 
section of the country were discussed. Dean Cath- 
erine Adams of Mills College spoke on "The Rela- 
tion of the Preparatory School to College." Included 
on the program were reports from the Washington 
delegates and delegates to a similar meeting in the 
east. Miss Flora A. Randolph of the Randolph 
School of Berkeley was one of the speakers. Many of 
the girls' schools on the coast were represented at the 
sessions, including Mary I. Lockey of the Castilleja 
School, Palo Alto; Edith Bridges of the Bridges 
School, Piedmont; Laura E. and Katharine Branson 
of the Katharine Branson School at Ross, Marin 
County; Charlotte F. Center of Piedmont; Mary E. 
Wilson of the Anna Head School of Berkeley; Kath- 
erine Burke of Miss Burke's School of San Fran- 
cisco; Helen Keeney of the Keeney School of Sacra- 
mento; Sara Harker of Miss Harker's School of Palo 
Alto; Helen A. Brooks of Cumnock School, Los An- 
geles; Carolyn Cummins of the Bishop's School of 



VOICE AND SILENT SINGING 

Exercises by which great singers build and restore the 

voice. Equally _ valuable for the health and speaking 

voice of those who do not sing. 

Mme. Irwin Kellogg 

Friday Morning Club House. Mondays and Fridays. 
Res. Phone WHitney 7793. FAber 1643. 



La Jolla; Frederica DeLaguna and Jessica Smith 
Vance of Westlake School for Girls, Los Angeles. 
Miss Vance, who is president of the association, pre- 
sided. Miss Randolph is secretary. A formal din- 
ner at the Fairmont Hotel, with Dean Adams as guest 
of honor, closed the sessions. 



WESTLAKE SCHOOL 

FOR GIRLS 

Resident and Day School 
333 S. Westmoreland Ave. Los Angeles 

KENWOOD HALL 

Resident and day school for girls. Sub-primary 
through High School. Spanish, French. Expres- 
sion. Dancing included in regjular tuition. 675 
S. Vermont Ave., Los Angeles. WAshington 1612. 



Los Angeles : 617.619 s. Broadway 

Pasadena : Colorado at Los Robles 

Apparel for Women, Misses and Juniors 



L 



MAY, 1926 



Page 27 



SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 

As a result of personal inquiry The Clubwoman takes pleasure in commending to California 
clubwomen the schools whose announcements appear in The Clubwoman. 



NEWLY LOCATED IN GLENDORA 
FOOTHILLS 

(gtrlsi' CoUesiate ^cljool 

Day and Boarding School 
Thirty-fourth year. Accredited East and 
West. New Buildings. Miss Parsons and 
Miss Dennen, Principals. Tel. Glendora 

44783. City office "Ask Mr. Foster." 

Information Service Robinson's Dept. 

Store, 7th St. and Grand Ave. Tel. BR. 
4701. 

Cumnock ^cI)ooI 

Thirty -First Year 

School of Expression, Academy and accredited 

high school in Class A, preparing for western 

and eastern universities. 

Complete courses in 

Vocal Interpretation of Art 

Literature Public Speaking 

Literary Appreciation Journalism 

Story-Telling Story Writing 

Voice and Diction Dramatic Art 

Aesthetic Dancing 

HELEN A. BROOKS. Director 

5353 West Third Street 

GRanite 3253 GR anite 3353 Los Angeles 



University of Southern California 

Bulletins with full description of 

courses on application 

Address Registrar 

University of Southern California 
35th and University Ave. Los Angeles 



ELLIOTT SCHOOL 

FOR GIRLS 

Residence and Day School. Sub-Primary 
through Eleventh Grade, Ideal Home 
Life. Character Building. Superior Edu- 
cational Advantages. Out-Door Classes. 
MARTHA COLLINS WEAVER, Principal, 
Gramercy Place at Pico Blvd., Los Angeles 



"TAe Coming IVest Point of the West" 

San Diego Army & Navy 
Academy 

The Academy enjoys the highest Scholastic rat- 
ing of the Univ. of Calif. — "Division A." It is 
under Government supervision. It emphasizes 
Christian Character Training. Address for infor- 
mation Col. Thos. A. Davis, Pres. Pacific Beach. 
Calif. 



ilSlarlborougf} ^cijool for <@trlsi 

Established 1889 
5029 W. 3rd St. Los Angeles 

Boarding and Day School 
Accredited to Eastern and Western 
Colleges- 
Ada S. Blake, A. B., Principal 

PAGE MILITARY ACADEMY 

A BIG SCHOOL FOB LITTLE BOYS 

The larficBt ot Its class In America. Everything adapted 
to meet the needs of the smaller boy. Five fireproof 
buildings; seven-acre campus: seventeen resident teachers. 
Here a boy Is taught self-reliance. Through military 
training he acquires habits of exactness, the spirit erf 
team work and co-operation and also energy and tnltla' 
tive — the best preparation for life, no matter what pro- 
fession he may follow. Let our Catalogue tell you all 
about our school. 

ROBEBT A. GIBBS. Headmaster 

1257 Cochran Avenue 

KMplre 9103. LOS ANQELES, CAL. 

SUMMER CAMP 

Give your boy a glorious vacation 
among the finest fishing streams and 
lakes of the HIGH SIERRAS. Horse- 
back riding, swimming, pack saddle 
trips, all sports. 23 years experience. 

Urban Military Academy 



Enroll now. 
HE 7602 



Secty. 637 Wilcox St. 
Los Angeles 



Pacific Military Academy 

Culver City 

Boarding and Day School. Beautiful new Italian 
Renaissance type buildings. Excellent Faculty. 
Out-door Classes. All athletics, swimming, gym- 
nasium, horseback riding and music. Enter any 
time in Grammar or High School. References 
required. For catalogue write Secretary or Phone 
Culver City 3294. 



The Greenwood School 

FOR GIRLS 

Select Resident and Day School. Limited Num- 
ber. In Session All Year. Principals: Mrs. M. 
Greenwood (Newnham College, Cambridge), Mr. 
H. F. Greenwood, B.A. (Corpus Christi College, 
Cambridge). 5928 Franklin Avenue, Hollywood. 



Page 28 



The CLUBfVOMAN 



TUESDAY AFTERNOON CLUB OF GLENDALE; 

By Eva Daniels, Publicity Chairman 



The Tuesday Afternoon Club of Glendale un- 
der the leadership of its worthy presiding officer, 
Mrs. Alexander Hamilton Montgomery, is 
rounding out a successful season. Outstanding 
features have been the sponsoring of the Glen- 
dale Symphony Orchestra of seventy musicians, a 
group organized mainly through the efforts of 
the late Mrs. Charles H. Toll, who was the 
most beloved member of the club and for whom 
a school in Glendale has already been dedicated 
in the name of Eleanor J. Toll, and a further 
memorial is being prepared for the near future. 

Four thousand dollars was necessary to estab- 
lish this orchestra, and in an intensive campaign 
of three weeks this amount was subscribed by in- 
dividuals who purchased seats for the series of 
five concerts. On the opening night Mrs. Toll ap- 
peared upon the platform to welcome an audi- 
ence which filled every seat, and was greeted 
with an ovation which brought tears of jov to 
the eyes of the woman who made this possible — 
her last tribute of service to her community. In 
the words of the writer of this article, who 
worked with her and knew how she put her 
whole being into everything she undertook : 
She drevir her bow across the violin 
With one last sweep, 
To give the world a symphony. 
And now we hear the music of the souls that 

weep 
In sympathy. 

Dear God, your heaveniy gates are opened. 
You called her time 

And she will enter in a blaze of glory 
To you. Lord, 
To a symphony sublime. 

And now the mantle of chairmanship of this 
splendid orchestra has fallen on the capable 
shoulders of Mrs. Daniel Campbell, junior past 
president of the club, who also has made history 
for the organization and who, too, has the love 
of the_ community. 

Another feature which is outstanding is the 
Woman's Choral Club recently established, and 
under one of the most prominent directors in the 
state, Hugo Kirchloffer, with Alice Ripley, the 
well-known accompanist. This department is 
open to non-members at a nominal fee, and al- 
ready comprises more than sixty ^vomen with 
splendid voices. This group will be a factor of 
value to the community. 

The Junior Auxiliary, too, established during 
the regime and with the loyal support of Mrs. 
Montgomery and the board of directors has been 
very successful under the personal guidance of 



SOUTH SIDE EBELL CLUB 

By Edna Grace Cooke, Sub-Press Chairman 

The showers of blessing that Los Angeles and 
Southern California as a whole, have been recov- 
ering in form of real April rain storms, have 
overflowed into South Side Ebell Club ; for 
though our showers of blessing were not in the 
form of rain, they were real blessings neverthe- 
less, for this month we have taken steps in 
progression that should make all rejoice. 

But before elucidation let us make mention 
of the district convention at Pasadena. South 
Side sent more than her share of delegates and 
lay members, for no meeting but was generously 
sprinkled with loyal Federation members from 
South Side and from all reports sifting back 
much inspiration was received and all became 
further imbued with the spirit to further "carry 
on" for their own club and their district. 

South Side has this month taken steps to in- 
corporate — a much needed measure and one that 
vi'ill place her in a position to accomplish much, 
make many innoviations that otherwise would be 
impossible. 

Still keep up to the high standard set the 
first of the year in speakers and assisting artists 
South Side has just passed through a month of 
unusually interesting and instructive programs, 
but special mention should be made of the won- 
derfully inspirational talk made by Mrs. Au- 
gusta W. Urquhart, past president of district 



Mrs. Thomas H. Hudson, with Lois Strother, 
one of its members as presiding officer, this group 
of twenty-five girls of high school age conduct 
their meetings in a parliamentary manner, which 
assures a future of promise to the parent organ- 
ization, as the girl of today is the woman of to- 
morrow. 

So, in defining success, the meaning is: Pros- 
perity, Advantage, Victory and Progress — all of 
which has been enjoyed by the club, namely: 
Prosperity, in the payment this month of $5000 
on the clubhouse debt through the efforts of the 
Ways and Means committee, headed by Mrs. E. 
S. McKee. Advantage — the best programs avail- 
able. Victory — the putting over of all activities 
attempted. Progress — the attainment of not only 
club, but civic achievement. And lastly, one def- 
inition more to the meaning of success, and that 
is Triumph, which Mrs. Montgomery, as pres- 
ident, may justly feel as she prepares to relin- 
quish her gavel to her successor in the Tuesday. 
Afternoon Club of Glendale. 



MAY, 1926 



Page 29 



and state, when she appeared on April 22, speak- 
ing on the subject of "Our National Parks." 

Sharing honors with Mrs. Urquhart at this 
meeting was Mrs. George Salm, past president 
of South Side, in whose honor the monthly lunch- 
eon was on that day given. 

The toastmistress was Mrs. H. N. Marsh 
and those responding, followed Mrs. Urquhart's 
lead by using "Trees" as their subject and in ad- 
dition a beautiful original poem on the same sub- 
ject was read by the club's 87-vear-old poetess, 
Mrs. L. Voss. 

South Side, following her usual custom of 
supporting all worthy causes, has for years set- 
aside one day in each club year for an American- 
ization program and on April 27 the club's Amer- 
icanization chairman, Mrs. S. E. Page, pre- 
sented a program of varied talent and extremely 
interesting. Aside from many little skits to 
demonstrate ways and means of teaching Amer- 
ican ways and speech to foreign-born residents, 
several extremely talented musicians appeared, 
rounding out the program to a perfect whole 
and thereby demonstrating just what it means 
to people born under less fortunate conditions 
than ourselves, that South Side Ebell and clubs 
like her, are constituting themselves their 
"brother's keepers." 



WOMAN'S CLUB OF HUNT- 
INGTON PARK 

By Mrs. Floy Runyon, Press Chairman 
Under the able direction of Mrs. Alan Dibble, 
the Woman's Club of Huntington Park is near- 
ing the close of a most successful year. 

Three departments have provided special in- 
struction for classes in Music, Drama, and Liter- 
ature throughout the year. The Music Section 
meeting the second and fourth Fridays each 
month under the direction of David L. Wright, 
have done most creditable work. At present the 
two required numbers for the Eisteddfod are be- 
ing rehearsed. A concert will be given some 
evening in May by the chorus. 



Witzel Photographer 

Official for 

THE CLUBWOMAN 

3 Studios in Los Angeles — for your 
convenience 

632+ HOLLYWOOD BLVD. 

PHONE HOLLY 03*3 

536 SOUTH BROADWAY 

ENTIRE SIXTH FLOOR 

PHONES: TUcker 2448— VAndikt 0414 

1011 WEST SEVENTH STREET 
PHONE 535-91 



Mrs. Ursula March-Largy of Venice conducts 
a class in Drama two Fridays each month, coach- 
ing and reviewing plays after fifteen minutes of 
physical culture. Three one-act plays are under 
rehearsal at present. "The Truth" by Clyde 
Fitch, a four-act comedy drama, was produced 
in March, netting a neat sum for the building 
fund. 

The English and Literature Section which 
meets the first and third Fridays of each month 
with Mrs. Jack Vallely of Los Angeles as in- 
structor, has proven highly entertaining as well 
as most instructive. A large number of books 
have been reviewed and a word drill is con- 
ducted each meeting by Mrs. Vallely. 

Each month social affairs have been given by 
the chairman of the Ways and Means commit- 
tee which have not only been most enjoyable but 
have helped substantially to clear the debt on the 
clubhouse site and bring nearer the realization of 
our fine big clubhouse. 

April 30 was Reciprocity Day for the 
Woman's Club of Huntington Park, with the 
board of directors acting as hostesses. A very 
excellent program was given. Mrs. J. B. Lor- 
beer, district president, making the principal ad- 
dress. 




For 
Every Baking 
Purpose ^ 




Page 30 



The CLUBWOMAN 




Exterior of the Nev; H. B. Crouch Co., Inc., Studio 



H. B. Crouch Co., Inc., Twelfth and Hoover 
Streets, has announced a formal opening for the 
week May 3rd to 7th, from 3 to 9 p. m. 

This well known and long established firm 
needs no introduction nor recommendation to 
readers of the "Clubwoman." As a collector 
and connoisseur of diamonds and other jewels; 
all manner of interesting antiques, whether fab- 
rics, shawls, obpects d'art, furniture, fans, minia- 
tures, china or rare glass, Mr. Crouch has served 
the discriminating public seeking artistic values 
and eiTects, as no one man has or could. 

In addition to his rare collection assembled 
largely in Europe, Mr. Crouch is a manufacturer 



of especially designed jewelry, and few cinema 
productions of merit have failed to show some 
of his work. Mary Pickford, Nazimova, Norma 
Talmadge, Carmel Myers, Douglas Fairbanks 
and many others are his patrons both for private 
and professional use. 

The "Clubwoman" has the pleasure through 
the courtesy of Mr. Crouch of inviting Its read- 
ers to this opening in this unique and interesting 
studio. Take "P" car and get off at Hoover 
Street and walk one block north, or take "L" 
car and get off at Hoover Street and walk one 
block south. 




Black and White Room of the H. B. Crouch Co., Inc., Studio 



ii 



MAY, 1926 



Page 31 



The Woman's Club of Huntington Park has 
been complimented in the appointment of Mrs. 
F. M. Letteny, district chairman of Endowment, 
who is a member of the club, to represent the 
state at the General Federation convention at 
Atlantic City. 



ALHAMBRA WOMAN'S CLUB 

Lillian M. Gilstrap, Press Chairman 
Under the leadership of Mrs. Thomas Charles 
Gould, president of the Alhambra Woman's 
Club, the membership has been enlarging its ac- 
tivities. The members regard, with a measure 
of justified pride, the progress made through the 
agency of the various sections since re-organiza- 
tion of the club. 

Mrs. Gould and an augmented Ways aqd 
Means committee had charge of a picturesque 
and successful fiesta which took place on April 
16 and 17. 

One year ago a lot near the present clubhouse 
was acquired by the executive board of the club 
and to clear this of all indebtedness is the first 
step in a building program that the present ad- 
ministration hopes to inaugurate before expira- 
tion of the club year. If the present undertak- 
ings carry on to success the club hopes to have 
a new home soon that will adequately meet the 



needs of a progressive woman's organization that 
seeks to give further service along lines recom- 
mended by the Federation, as well as be an in- 
spiration to others to follow their leadership in 
similar endeavors. 



W. A. R. M. A. 



By Mrs. M. I. Clemmer, Press Chairman 
Mrs. John Diephaus, chairman Ways and 
Means committee, announces a very successful 
dinner given by the Women's Auxiliary of the 
Railway Mail Association April 16 in Odd Fel- 
lows Hall, 1828 Oak Street. Nearly 200 guests 
partook of the tempting viands, the serving of 
which reflected much credit on Mrs. W. H. 
Weedon, in charge. 

Mrs. John B. Good presented a short pro- 
gram, including musical numbers by Clyde Cook, 
accompanied by Mrs. Edna G. Cook, Mrs. Olive 
M. Chivers accompanied by Mrs. S. R. Oates, 
and Maxine Alexander, whistler, with Ruth 
Thomas at the piano. All were enjoyable and 
well received. The remainder of the evening 
was given to bridge and five hundred. 

The regular club meeting was held April 19 
in the conference room. Bank of Italy. Reports 
of the state convention and reciprocity meetings 
were read and nominations were submitted for 
new officers. Election will be in May. . 



1 1 lHE]SE] are tHe positions and scores 
■^ given Adohr samples in fi-ve import- 
ant and competiti-ve contests for certified 
milk during tHe year 1S2S: 



February City Health Department, Los Angeles First 

May National Contest, Atlantic City, IS. J. First 

July City Health Department, Los Angeles 

September California State Fair, Sacramento First 

November Pacific Slope Dairy Show, Oakland First 



comparative 
scores not 
announced 



98.4% 
99.5% 
99.0% 

97.7% 
98.7% 



The quality and cleanliness of 
this nationally famous milk are 
unchanging day in and day out. 

yOOHl GUERNSEY CERTIFIED MILK 

for service, telephone TUcker 3560 



Page 32 



The CLUBWOMAN 



SAN GABRIEL WOMAN'S 
CLUB 

By Mrs. John F. Willard, President 
ST. PAUL'S CATHEDRAL IN LONDON 

The See of London was established by Augustine of 
Canterbury when the Anglo-Saxons first embraced 
Christianity, towards the end of the seventh century, 
and a church was founded and built on the site of 
the present building by King Ethc'bert, who dedicated 
it to St. Paul, the Apostle. It was ilestroyed by fire in 
962, but was rebuilt the same year. 

This was the beginning of the stiange series of 
disasters and delays, hopes and fears of which the 
interesting history of this gieat carhelral is com- 
prised. The use of this second building was com- 
paratively brief, for it followed the fate of its pre- 
decessor and was totally destroyed by fire in 1083. It 
was refounded in 1087, but was left far from com- 
plete. Then various parts were added by various 
bishops until it was completed in 1315. This meant 
over three hundred years of more or less continuous 
building. 

It was built in a variety of styles from early Nor- 
man to what is called Decorated. Its total length was 
five hundred and ninety-six feet its breadth one 
hundred and four feet, and its greatest height, one 
hundred and forty-two feet, while it covcied oyer 
three acres. 

At first it was surrounded by a wall, penetrated 
by six gateways. Inside this wall, was a churchyard, 
and outside, quite close, were the gallows and the 
town pillory — a strange companionship! Our concep- 
tion of church influence is peace and spiritual help. 
To those who lived there, it meant power attained 
by physical force. 

Old Saint Paul's was the center of uncounted 
brawls and disputes, and its clerical dispostion was 
harsh and unlovely, in keeping with those times. 

The great fire of London in 1666 destroyed the 
chief part of the building and irreparably damaged 
the rest. The task of restoration was plainly so 
great that a great many years elapsed before it was 
decided that repairs were hopeless and that it must 
be entirely rebuilt. 

A commission was then appointed, and nine years 
later, in 1675, the first stone was laid by Christopher 
Wren. It took ten years to build the walls of the 
choir and its aisles, and it was first used for worship 
in 1697. 

In 1710 it was finished; the highest — and last — stone 
was laid by Christopher Wren, son of the great archi- 
tect. Can you imagine the solemnity of the act after 
thirty-five years from his father's beginning? 

The books tell me that not until eighty years after 
the great building was completed was any monument 
placed in it; also that after sixty-three years, the 
authorities began to decorate the interior — "con- 
sidered too monotonous" — with the work of eminent 
painters and sculptors. The monuments were all of 
white marble, except the bases upon the floor, or an 
occasional bronze. 

There are crypts, libraries, chapels, assembly rooms, 
choir and organ loft, and residents' "stalls.'' So now 
the wonderful, old architect would rejoice to see the 
building used as he had hoped, with its Thanksgiving 
services, its great musical events where ten or twelve 
thousand attended, and its constant use by the people. 

As an architectural whole, it has caused endless 
discussion and much criticism, good and bad. Yet 
after all, it remains a marvel of conception and exe- 
cution. A very competent judge affirms that for dig- 
nity and elegance, no church in England can be com- 



pared with the great dome of Saint Paul's Cathedral. 

In construction, it is sometimes labelled "classical," 
sometimes "Roman," sometimes "Italian" ; in truth, it 
is none of these, (I quote) "It is English Renaissance." 

If I tell you how it is built, — with what stories, 
towers and porticos, what will it avail? Only to see 
it with your own eyes, or — as I have done — to study 
it in pictures, can give you the slightest idea of it. 

Sir Christopher Wren's plans and hopes for this 
cieation of his were entirely ignored for a long time; 
but, as we have seen, the decorations and what might 
bo termed the side issues, came after a while. Now 
it stands as one of the wonderful things of the 
world; a place where beauty lovers must adore, and 
where thinking people must think much and long and 
depart from it richer in memories and uplifted in 
ideals. 

Now I have told you what books have told me. I 
am not one of those fortunate people who can travel 
and see the great cathedrals and other worthy build- 
ings and creations. As I said before, books are my 
only teachers, not experiences. Yet I feel that I have 
seen St. Paul's Cathedral. Why, otherwise, was I 
given imagination and the power to think and to apply 
to myself the things thus seen? Immediately, and of 
necessity, following this experience, (for it has be- 
come a real experience) my restless mind said ivhyf 
Why did I visit St. Paul's? Why am I impressed by 
its construction, its history, its lessons, its memories? 
For it really seems as if I had seen the things of 
which I read and have their memories with me. 

To be explicit, and to come nearer home, why do 
I come to this club? Why do I attend the classes in 
literature and art and architecture? 

I am one of those thousands of women whose life 
has been filled with the puzzles and problems of 
children's upbringing. I have fretted over the baby's 
colic and croup. I have wondered whatever would 
become of my headstrong and wilful Bobby. I have 
been anxious over the escapades of my "Happy-go- 
lucky" Bill; and I have carried on my heart day and 
night the problems presented by my careless, heedless, 
beauty-loving and boy-attracting girl. You many 
mothers know what this all means. And I have not 
found it true that they are "off my hands" when they 
have gone into homes of their own, or when they 
are shifting for themselves. 

IVhy, then, and Iww is it that I have gravitated, 
almost without my own volition, to this club, to this 
class, to my friends the books? I think I have ans- 
wered the question for myself; may I pass it on to 
you? For it comes to me as a message to be passed 
on It is this: Such problems as I have referred to 
• are right. They are part of the highest business in 
all the world — the highest and most far-reaching — 
the business of motherhood and mothering. 

But if we stay on that path of anxiety all our lives, 
we inevitably grow narrow — too often petty — and, to 
a large degree, contracted of mind and heart. We 
need, as indeed does every human being, constant 
education ; and by just so much as we educate our- 
selves do we outgrow the narrowness, the pettiness 
and the contraction, or choking, of mind and heart. 

And because this club forces us to see, hear, know 
about and be interested in many matters otherwise 
unknown to us; and because these classes force us ta 
see such things as I have told you about, they are of 
untold value and uplift to us. 

Friends, could any one of us stand in these cathe- 
dral aisles and look, and look and look at the wonder- 
ful architecture and not be uplifted hy it? Could we 
stand in the crypt and view the monuments of those 
men who accomplished great things and not rise to 
hopes of better accomplishments for ourselves? Could 
we study the light, color, harmony, beauty of the 



I 



MAY, 1926 



Page 33 



Directory of California Products 

For the convenience of the seventy thousand clubwomen of California and the many other* 
who have enthusiastically subscribed to the campaign of the women's clubs to promote in every pos- 
sible way the use by Californians of California products, The Clubw^oman, mouthpiece of the cam,- 
paign, presents the following partial classified list of Classified products. In planning their shop- 
ping, clubwomen will find this list handy reference guide to what to order in carrying out their 
pledge to buy Califronia-made goods wherever possible. 



I 



AWNINGS 

Acme Tent and Awning Co. — Canopies. 
4069 Mission Road, Los Angeles. Tele- 
phone CApitoI 7380. 

BUILDING MATERIALS 

Doors-Sash-Screens — Veneered Doors, High 
Grade Interior Finish — Pacific Door & 
Sash Co. 

Hardwood Floor Finishers and Contractors 
— National Floor Co., Los Angeles. 

Mirrors, Sand, Plaster, Vitrolite — Raphael 
Glass Co., Los Angeles. 

Pioneer Paper Co., Manufacturers of Roof- 
ings. 

Sash-Doors-Hardwoods-Hardware — Frank 
Graves Sash, Door and Mill Co. 

CLOTHING 

"Bentsknit," "Ribstitched," Bathing Suits 
and Sweaters — Pacific Knitting Mills, Los 
Angeles. 

"Summers Quality" outing and work cloth- 
ing for men and boys Summers Mfg. 

Co., Inc. 

CARPET CLEANING 
City Steam Carpet Cleaning Works, John 
Bloeser, Main 0430. New Rugs. 

FOODS 

Honey Nut Bread "It's the Flavor" 

Baruch Baking Co., 3545 Pasadena Ave. 
Phone CApitol 5770. 

Biscuits, crackers, etc. — Pacific Coast Bis- 
cuit Co., Los Angeles. 

Capitol Products, flour, etc. — Capitol Mill- 
ing Co., Los Angeles. 

Christopher Co., L. J. — Quality Ice Cream 
and Candies. 

Faultless Bread — "Let your daily bread be 
Faultless." Faultless Bread Bakery, Los 
Angeles. 

Globe "A1" Flour, Macaroni Products and 
Cereals — Globe Grain and Milling Co., 
Los Angeles. 

Iris Brand "Over 200 Wonderful Things to 
Eat" — Distributed by Haas, Baruch & 
Co., Los Angeles. 

Morola — Nut Margarine, Morris & Co., Los 
Angeles. 



Olson's Bread, "O So Good" — Olson Bak- 
ing Co., Los Angeles. 

Puritas Vacuum-packed Coffee a Los An- 
geles product, at most grocers. 

Miss Saylor's, Inc., Unusual Chocolates, 
6752 Venice Blvd., Culver City. 

FURNITURE AND HOUSE FITTINGS 
Barker Bros., 716-738 South Broadway — 
Complete Furnishers of Successful Homes 
— Our "Own Make" and "Mastermade" 
Upholstered Furniture and Hand-tailored, 
"individualized" Mattresses and Box 
Springs. 
Inglewood Furniture — Inglewood Manufac- 
turing Co., Inglewood, Cal. 
Kling Furniture — Kling Manufacturing Co., 

Los Angeles. 
Kwality Pillows, etc. — Kwality Feather Co., 
Los Angeles. 

Los Angeles Can Co. — Manufacturers of 
Tin Cans for all purposes. 
Sanotuf Mattress, furniture — Roberti Bros., 

Los Angeles. 
Stockwell Neverstretch Mattress — L. W. 

Stockwell Co., Los Angeles. 
Upholstered Furniture — Soronow's Furni- 
ture Manufacturing Co., Los Angeles. 
Window Shades — Window Shade Products 
Company, 910 East Fourth St., Los An- 
geles. 
"Zenith" Upholstered Furniture and Mat- 
r tresses — Bailey-Schmitz Co., Los An- 
geles. 
Citizens Independent Ice & Cold Storage 
Co., 61 0-620 South Raymond Ave., Pasa- 
dena, California. Phone Colorado 30. 

GASOLINE AND MOTOR OIL 
Ventura Gasoline "California's Best," Ven- 
tura Motor Oil (Paraffin-Base) — ^Ventura 
Refining Co., Los Angeles. 

MOTOR TRUCKS 
Moreland Motor Truck Co., Los Angeles. 

ST ORAGE BATTERIES 
Hobbs Storage Batteries, Hobbs Storage 
Battery Corp., Los Angeles. 

WATER HEATERS 
De Luxe and Supreme Gas Water Heaters 
— General Water Heater Corp., 1601 
Compton Ave. 



Page 34 



The CLUBWOMAI^ 



paintings, or the sweep and curve of the statues, and 
not be ourselves uplifted to brighter living? 

This it is, this uplifting of the soul, this rebuilding 
of downcast hopes, this renewal of energy, which blots 
out the weariness or the discouragement and makes us 
new again. 

That is my answer to the Why? 

ST. PAUL'S CATHEDRAL 
Oh mighty mass of stone! more than mere stone art 

thou. 
Thou art the hopes, the aspiration of a soul, 
Put into visible shape to please the eyes that see. 
To rest the tired heart and bring forgetfulness 
Of life's small worries, and its hurts and tears. 
We stand beneath thy arches, touch thy columns high. 
Vision thy lights and colors, trace thy mighty curves, 
And we are lifted far above our little woes. 
We feel, we know not how, that here we stand within 
A temple built by God Himself within the Man. 
Our troubles become small. Life grows as vast as 

this 
The visioned dream of some aspiring soul. 
Who knows that Life is large, is sweet, is true. 
Thoughts writ in changeless stone thou art, to stay 

with us 
That we may read and never lose their majesty. 
We leave thy shadowed portals in a silence still and 

deep, 
And take thy teachings with us to resurrect our souls. 



prizes will be given at this meeting in the Am- 
bassador Theatre. 



Women's University Club 

(Continued from Page 14) 

The Hollywood-Beverly Hills section gave a 
bridge tea at the Women's Athletic Club. The 
hostesses were Misses Blanche and Grertrude 
Graham, Mrs. T. F. Cooke and Miss Elizabeth 
Cook. 

The Literature section Tuesday, April 27, un- 
der the direction of Leslie Connor Williams, 
reviewed Romaine Pollard's volumes, "Annette 
and Sylvia," and "Summer" with reference to 
his early work "Jean Christopher." Mr. Wil- 
liams also directs the study of "The Explorers," 
who meet Wednesday mornings at the Gaylord. 

The International Round Table discussion this 
month was of the recent crisis in the League of 
Nations, and the resulting situation. 

The deans of women gathered in conference 
in Los Angeles April 14, 15 and 16, held their 
business sessions at the club house and were 
guests at tea after the sessions. 

The club is looking forward in anticipation to 
the Saturday meeting May 1. The two original 
one-act plays which received the first and second 



ASK FOR 

CAPITOL 
PRODUCTS 

MANUFACTURED BY 

A HOME INDUSTRY 



Pasadena Shakespeare Club 

, (Continued from Page 6) 

Episcopal Sunday School of Pasadena. 

To be associated with Mrs. Dorn on the board 
of directors of the Shakespeare club are Mrs. 
John Franklin West as first vice-president and 
chairman of departments; Mrs. A. J. Wimgard, 
second vice-president and chairman of publicity ; 
Mrs. J. W. Morin, third vice-president and 
chairman of program ; Mrs. Harry Van Sit- 
tert, fourth vice-president and chairman of public 
affairs; Mrs. William A. Spill, recording secre- 
tary; Mrs. William A. Cochrane corresponding 
secretary ; Mrs. Frederick Gillmor, treasurer ; 
Mrs. R. C. Olmsted, auditor ; Mrs. W. N'. Van 
Nuys, membership chairman and Mrs. W. D. 
Dilworth, house chairman. 



Tuseday Morning Club 

(Continued from Page 10) 
editorial writers in this country, on "A Quarter 
Century Magnificent." 

"Art and Life" was presented by Gutzon 
Borglum, famous sculptor and artist ; and the 
lecture on "The College, the Scarlet Gown," 
given by Dr. A. Blythe Webster, of St. Andrews, 
the oldest University in Scotland, will be re- 
membered as one of the out-standing programs 
of the year. 

Then our own Dr. Robert Freeman, pastor 
of the First Presbyterian Church of Pasadena, 
spoke to the club of his recent trip to Palestine. 

The 362nd birthday of Shakespeare was cele- 
brated on Friday, April 23, and the atmosphere 
of the sixteenth century was reproduced with a 
program under the direction of Mrs. Andrew 
Stewart Lobingier, past president of the club. 

Musical programs have been presented during 
the year by such artists as Alex Simonsen, Homer 
Grunn, Calmon Luboviski, Olga Steeb, Tilda 
Rohr and Esther Dale. 



HOUSEHOLD HINTS 



An occasional application of furniture pol- 
ish helps to keep the wooden back of clothes 
brush or hairbrush in condition. The brush 
must be perfectly dry when this treatment 
is applied. 



If window sills are washed with a weak 
solution of chloride of lime it will be found 
effective for keeping midges and gnats out. 
It also helps to keep the air fresh in warm 
weather. 



Pull stockings in shape w^hile still damp; 
they last longer if they are not ironed. 



I 



/^% 




J' 



une 



I g26 



XVICL 




IT COSTS NO MORE 

— you might as well have 

BEKINS SERVICE TO 
— move 
— ship 
— pack or 
— store 
your household goods, piano, rugs, trunks, 
motor car 

PLEASE PHONE 

WEstmore 4141 

LOS ANGELES 
1335 S. Figueroa St. 4th & Alameda Sts. 

HOLLYWOOD— BEVERLY HILLS 

Phone GLadstone 4793 

8421 Santa Monica Blvd. 

OFFICES and DEPOSITORIES AT: 

Los Angeles - San Francisco - Oakland 

Sacramento - Fresno - Hollywood 

Beverly Hills 




WRITE ADS- 
WIN PRIZES— 

Zain Ad Writing Contest 

(In the Los Angeles Times) 

IT'S EASY 

To Write Ads About The 



ROBERTI 




u 



MATTRESS 



Full information at 

Your Furniture Store 

or write direct to 




1 346 Long Beach Avenue 



WATER STYLES 

Startling new developments in water-wear are reflected in this 
season's beach apparel. 

Make sure your men are authentically attired for the beach, 
Style is now as important on the sand as in the business office. 

Bathing Suits at six dollars and more . . . 

in each of the Mullen and Bluett stores 

MULLEN & BLUETT 



IN HOLLYWOOD 
TJie Boulevard at Vine 



CloimerS 

IN LOS ANGELES 
On Broadivay at Sixth 



IN PASADENA 
Colorado near Madison 



Vol. XVI 

Published Monthly 



JUNE, 1926 



No. 9 



Office 1425 Mission Street, South Pasadena 
Telephone EL. 2734; if no answer, EL. 117S 
Mail Address Box 26, South Pasadena, Cal. 

Subscription Price 50 Cents Per Year, Ten Cents the Copy Send subscriptions to Mrs. Bert Clifford, Box 26, 

South Pasadena, Cal. 
Edited by the Press Chairmen of the Clubs Represented 
Entered at the South Pasadena Postoffice as second-class matter. 



Gleason's Parliamentary Digest 

1110 West 30th Street ' 
LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 

Cloth Cover Digests, per copy $2.00 

Paper Cover Digests, per copy $1.50 

A Lesson in Parliamentary Practice — Lesson and Drill 

Number Six — Includes Quiz upon 

Subsidiary Motions and Postponed Indefinitely and 

Drill Discussing 

Law Observance and Law Enforcement. 

Drill is an 8 page folder. 

Price 5 Cents per copy; 50 cents per dozen copies. 




Gifts 
From the Orient 

Tai Chan Co. 

Cloissone, Brass, Lac- 
quer, Porcelain, Kimo- 
nos, Haori and Man- 
darin Coats, Oriental 
Jewelry, Novelties. 

621 So. Flower St., L. A. 
(3 Doors No. of The Elite) 



Bread and Grapes 

In an address before the Texas Federation of Women's Clubs, Mrs. Percy V. Pennybacker 

so tnovingly told an incident of child life on the shores of the Mediterranean, when she visited 

last fall the Near East Relief orphanages in Greece and saw 2,000 children sit down to a frugal 

supper of bread and grapes, that a.woman from her home state, Lexie Dean Robertson, has been 

inspired to un-ite the following lines: 

In ancient Greece there stands a rugged hospice 
Where hungry little foreign waifs are fed. 
And when the humble, yneagre food is offered 
There comes a quiet hour when prayers are said. 



Bread and grapes: 

With sweet child faces eager 

And shining with the freedom of release. 

Bread and grapes: 

And dark eyes filled with dreaming 

A day when humankind knows o?il]' peace. 

Oh, mothers, in your happy firelit households 

With silver on the table set for tea. 

So far away from terrors and bereavements 

That broke those baby hearts across the sea. 

Remember it is you to whom the future 

Must owe its peace from bitter wars that bled. 

And you must answer if the years' tomorrows 

Bring days when there are only grapes and bread. 



Page 4 



The CLUBWOMAN 




in beautifying your home furnishingf 

All wlio avail themselves of this opportunity, can 
in a surprisingly short while, really work wonders 
in adding beauty and charm to home interiors and 
furnishings. Your success is assured because of 
our capable Instructor and the high grade materials 
we recommend. 

Instructions and Demonstrations daily from 

1 ta 5 P: M. 

Our unusually attractive domestic and imported 

wall coverings will also be gladly shotvn you. 

PRACTICAL DEMONSTRATION OF 
— Prizma Art Dyes, — Decalcamanias 

— Art Crystals — Poster Colors 

— Dye Extracts — Water and Oil Colors 

— Photo Color Sets — Transfer Designs for 

Furniture (Full Supply of) — above items 
— Academy Boards — Art Kits — ^Wire Forms 
Artist Tools 

PHONE TRinity 0051 PICO AND HILL STS. 

THE MATHEWS PAINT COMPANY, Inc. 




MATHEWS 



}e 01X1 Cnglisif) ^tple Igisfcuitfi 

Made by the Bakers of 
Snow Flakes 

Baked in the largest and most modern 
English type traveling oven in the west. 
May be purchased also by pound or 
package from most grocers on the 
Pacific Coast. 

SHORTIE TIFFIN 

OXFORD ARROWROOT 

PETIT BEURRE DUNDEE 

BUFORD AVON 

ORANGE NECTAR 
PANAMA CREAM 

PACIFIC COAST BISCUIT CO. 



Los Angeles 

Sacramento 
Seattle Tacoma 



San Francisco 
Portland 

Spokane 



JUNE, 1926 



Page 5 



<.-*'^ 



Contents 



(~^^_} 



Bread and Grapes 3 

Woman's Club, Hollywood 6 

The Woman's Law Enforcement Committee 7 

Friday Morning Club 8 

Long Beach Ebell 9 

The Tuesday Morning Club 9 

Los Angeles Ebel! 10 

Pasadena Shakespeare Club 14 

The Women's University Club 14 

The Los Angeles Audubon Society 16 

South Side Ebell 17 

Wednesday Morning Club 18 

Soroptimist Club 19 

Santa Monica Bay Woman's Club 21 

Galpin Shakespeare Club 22 

Gleason's Parliamentary Digest 22 

College Women's Club of Long Beach 22 

Highland Park Ebell 23 

Echo Park Mother's Club _ 24 

California History and Landmarks Club 24 

Sagus Community Club 25 

Neptunian Club 26 

Montebello Woman's Club , 27 

Tujunga Woman's Club 29 

Alhambra Woman's Club 29 

Woman's Club of Downey 29 

Inglewood Woman's Club 30 

Railway Mail Auxiliary 30 

Death of The Trees 31 




jTHA-T OILIVE 

VACATION'THINGS 

ARE READY IN 

THE DYAS SHOP! 



A LL manner of smart, 
comfortable sports 
clothes, for women who are 
to be spectators of, or par- 
takers in, active sports this 
Summer. 



All Habits 
are fitted in 
the Saddle! 




"Vacation "[Riding 

Books wisely selected are your best 
vacation companions. 

They amuse, entertain, and in- 
struct. 

Always ready for your instant call. 
Never offended if left alone. 

Standard titles of fiction in re- 
print editions. 

Welcome to our book shelves to 
select your vacation com- 
panions. 



The JONES 



Opposite 

Squire"^ BOOK Store 

Los Angeles, California 



. 426-428 
West 
Sixth 



Page 6 



The CLUBPFOMAN 



■lllllliiillliiiiiiiii 



iiiiiiii Miiiniiiiiiiiiniiiiiii 



WDMAW^ CWB OF-HODL^WOOD 

llllllll!llllllllllll!ll!illllllllllllllllllllllliPIIIIII!llll{||||||ill 




Mrs. Charles H. Richmond 



By Mrs. Charles H. Richmond^ President 



In closing two years of service as club president it 
is difficult to keep the yearnings one had at the begin- 
ning from changing into regret that more has not been 
accomplished. However a woman's club the size of 
ours has such far flung lines no one can estimate or 
define its service. 

Fifteen hundred active members, one hundred 
juniors, including one hundred new active members, 
cannot but.be an influence in a community. After a 
club president returns from both district and state 
conventions of federated clubs it is easier to give an 
inventory of her own club, though nothing is of real 
value that is not properly related to its own situation. 

That self culture is gained in our clubs, is unques- 
tioned but is not the greatest value passing it on to 



those outside club circles? This is the outstanding 
effort of the Woman's Club of Hollywood. 

Hollywood is a word full of imagination; a place 
which creates the greatest diversion and recreation 
ever given to any people in any age — the motion 
picture. 

Every great institution in Hollywood has this 
fascinating competitor in interest and publicity, so 
we do really have to work to get attention from our 
community. 

The year closing has been a most successful one 
especially in department work. We have seventeen 
departments and sections and all have functioned 
well. We have the most gifted people of our coun- 
try and abroad attracted by our great industry, so 



JUNE. 1926 



Page 7 



our chairmen and programs are second to none, using 
this opportunity. I believe our newest and most cred- 
itable achievement is the Child Welfare Department, 
primarily uiulcr our city health department. The 
chairman, Dr. Mary Hesse Brown, is loaned to us 
each Thursday by our county health ilepartincnt. The 
city nursing division also sends registered nurses. 
The work is said to be second to none in the United 
States, having not only physical tests for young chil- 
dren but also a nursery school for pre-school children. 
a habit forming training. In addition, mothers' con- 
ferences are held which are led by the best minds of 
men and women trained in child work from our uni- 
vorsilios, child guidance clinic and schimls. Philan- 
thropies and scholarships are cared for. The Depart- 
ments of Education, .\merican Home, Bible and 
Music, are open to the public, as are at times other 
meetings. The relation to our schools has always 
been an intimate one, and was this last year accented 
by the gift of a membership card to the club to every 
woman teacher in otir high and elementary schools 
in the Hollywood section. 

Hollywood has set a precedent for the world in 
developing music at nominal prices for the people. 
Our music chairman has been iSlrs. J. J. Carter, who 
established our great Bowl Symphony concerts, and 
the club this year has been a guarantor for as fine 
a community orchestra as this section of country can 
boast. Putting on concerts of finest musical stand- 
ards at Zi cents admission. In October a flower show 
of rare artistic beauty was given. Social activities 
of many kinds, using a large ninnber of \vomen on 
committees have been carried on. Food sales held 
each week have netted the club over one thousand 
dollars, Uniting with the Hollywood Chamber of 



Commerce and the Community Chorus we gave an 
evening reception and program to the newcomers in 
our community, productive of much good in this land 
of strangers and attended by huiulreds. 

A children's chorus of over two hundred, and our 
own Woman's CUdi chorus are both of great credit 
to our orga[>i/atioi\. The Art Department, Mrs. 
Roscoe Shrader, chairman, in its exhibits and pro- 
grams does all possible to ei\courage our local artists 
of high standards, and in a thumb-box sketch sale 
before Christmas, sold over a dozen canvasses. 

The department chairmen preside over our lunch- 
eons in turn, and these arc in some cases department 
programs. The Literature Department has necessar- 
ily been confined to our own members which have 
taxed the capacity of the dining roo[n. The litera- 
ture chairman has been Mrs. Orville Routt, who 
served also as district chairman of literature, and 
who has just recently been elected to the presidency of 
the club. The Drama chairman, Miss Neely Dick- 
son, was formerly director of the Hollywood Com- 
munity Theater, and is now directing the famous 
Pilgrimage or Christ Play in Hollywood. 

We have had a gooil year financially, but the 
greatly increa.sed value of our property makes our 
taxation so heavy we have revised our by-laws to 
raise dues from ten dollars per year to fifteen. We 
also decided to admit our junior members to full 
active club membership after twenty-one years of age, 
and two years junior membership. 

Our main programs have been splendid and varied, 
and we owe much to the brilliant speakers obtained 
through the extension departn\ents of the two largest 
vHiiversities here. We had a course of six lectures 
on the World Today by Paul Harvey of New York, 
and other programs to further a knowledge of world 
afi^airs tending toward world peace. 



THE WOMAN'S LAW ENFORCEMENT COMMITTEE 

By Ruth Stnry 



For the purpose of putting more force into law- 
enforcement, the Woman's Law Enforcement Commit- 
tee of Southern California has outlined a busy summer 
for all women who are champions of the Eighteenth 
Amendment, and as the clubs close for the season, 
the Woman's Law Enforcement Committee will re- 
cruit club members to its ranks. 

The avowed purpose of the Woman's Law Enforce- 
ment Committee as stated by Mrs. J. C. Urquhart, its 
general chairman, is as follows: 

"Our purpose is to uphold prohibition as the law 
of the land; to urge its enforcement; to encourage 
conscientious study of its benefits, moral, social and 
economic, and to strengthen and unify the woman 
vote in the state in favor of dry candidates for 
ofiice, believing that the law can only become effective 
when administrated by its friends." 

One of the interesting developments of the work 
of the committee is the effort to bring the youth of 
the land into its fold. This effort has already been 
well repaid by a definite and encouragingly large 
response from boys and girls alike, from colleges and 
high schools. At the Allegiance Luncheon given last 
month by the Law Enforcement Committee several 
tables were occupied by college and high school stu- 
dents, and the girl's glee club of Polytechnic High 
School, thirty strong, provided music "as their con- 
tribution to the cause. " 

The women working for law enforcement believe 



that the field of youth is one of its most important 
fields of activity. They believe this, not alone because 
these boys and girls are tomorrow's citizens, but be- 
cause they feel the importance of educating them for 
today's understanding, today's citizenship. 

It is considered clever, committee members point 
out, to raise an eyebrow, to shrug a shoulder, and to 
make some utterly unfounded, cynical remark about 
the sophistication of the boys and girls of today. The 
Law Enforcement Conunittee is finding in its work 
that instead of cynicism from the young people, there 
is an eager, clean-minded enthusiasm in rallying to 
a movement for law enforcement in general, and for 
prohibition law enforcement in particular. 

Another cynicism which the committee believes has 
been fostered to make law violation easy, is the gen- 
eral saying in regard to enforcing the Eighteenth 
.\mendment, "Oh, it can't be done." Los Angeles and 
Southern California club women who compose this 
committee, have adopted a slogan to the effect "It 
can be done!" It is their intention to arouse the 
thought both of adults and of young people that law 
can be enforced and that it will be enforced at the 
demaml of the public. 

Mrs. Dora A. Stearns is chairman of the speakers 
bureau, which will send speakers on request to any 
and all meetings this sununer. Club leaders, inHuen- 
tial educators and church workers are unifying to put 
over the work of the Woman's Law Enforcement 
Committee. 



Page 8 



The CLUBWOMAN 



FRIDAY -tvlORNIKG CITCTB 



PSYCHOLOGY COMMITTEE OF THE FRIDAY MORNING CLUB 
By Mrs. Leo J. S. Smith, Chair/nan 

In January, 1925, the Psychology Committee of the 
Friday Morning Club originated when a little group 
of the younger members, realizing a need which had 
not been met by any of the existing committees, or- 
ganized under the leadership of Mrs. Leo Smith, Mrs. 
J. H. Russell and Mrs. Louis Tolhurst. They were 
nominally one of several groups functioning as sub- 
committees of the Drama Committee under Mrs. 
Thurston, chairman, but their success was due entirely 
to their own courage, enthusiasm and perseverance. 

A course of lectures was arranged for at an ex- 
pense of $250, the cost being defrayed by the sale of 
tickets to non-members thus enabling the club mem- 
bers to enjoy these lectures free of charge; a-n oppor- 
tunity which was greatly appreciated. Such well- 
known authorities on the subject as Dr. Miriam Van 
Waters, Dr. Aaron Rosanoff, Dr. J. Harold Williams 
and Dr. Mary Neff were secured, and the result jus- 
tified the efforts of the committee. Their subjects 
were always interesting, and more or less varied, 
but the department of Child Psychology was strictly 
adhered to as a topic for the year. 

In October, 1926, as an independent committee 
under Mrs. Leo Smith the organization resumed its 
activities, and having proven its importance to the 
club a special allowance was made in the club budget 
to place the Psychology Committee on the same finan- 
cial footing as all the others. The year opened with 
two lectures on Child Psychology by Dr. J. Harold 
Williams, whose popularity had justified his re-en- 
gagement. In December, Dr. Elizabeth Sullivan spoke 
on the subject of the ductless glands and their rela- 
tion to conduct and character. In January Dr. J. 
Harold Williams gave his third and last lecture for 
the year, "Heredity and Environment," and in Febru- 
ary Dr. Shepherd Ivory Franz was heard by an in- 
terested audience on the comprehensive subject, "The 
Brain and the Mind." March brought Dr. Sullivan 
again, speaking on "Psychology and the Day's Work," 
stressing routine as most desirable ,and restful, con- 
ducive also to the formation of habit. In April Dr. 
Franz gave his views on mental tests and their limi- 
tations convincing his audience of the greater impor- 
tance of the social adjustment than the attainment of 
the high intellectual rating. 

On the last Tuesday in May Dr. Franz will give 
the final psychology lecture for the year, his subject 
being the all-embracing topic of the course, "What Is 
Modern Psychology?" 

There remains now no doubt as to the value to 
the club as a whole, and the popularity among the 
members as individuals, of these lectures on this 
most important of all topics, and every effort was 
made to have the best available lecturers and to pre- 
sent the most popular aspects of the subject of mod- 
ern psychology. 




FRIDAY MORNING CLUB NOTES 

By Mrs. Bertram Holmes, .Assistant Press Chairman 
With virtually five clubs combined in one, the Fri- 
day Morning Club's Tuesday programs by the art, 
drama, public affairs, literature and music depart- 
ments have told off a year of interest, instruction and 
social incentive. 

Mrs. Richard C. Farrell, chairman of art; Mrs. 



Mrs. John J. Abramson 

First rice-President of the Friday Morning Club 

and Chairman of Public .4ffairs Comm. 

W. F. Thurston, chairman of Drama; Mrs. John 
J. Abramson, chairman of Public Affairs; and Dr. 
Dorothea Moore, chairman of Literature, have pro- 
vided study outlines in turn. Mrs. Charles G. Stivers, 
chairman of Music, planned her year's contributions 
to maintain the club's high standard, before going 
abroad, and Grace Adele Freebey opened her studio 
for the monthly musical teas held in the art gallery. 

Topical under the broad presentations by the Pub- 
lic Affairs department, the Tuesday audiences had the 
"why" of city planning and how it pays in dollars 
and cents; what is needed in legislation to secure 
building safety and the height limit permissible for 
traffic safety; the relation existing between juvenile 
police, the child and community; the parole system, 
fire prevention and traffic congestion; street opening 
and widening, street tree planting and reforestation; 
social service, the Community Chest, policewomen's 
work and child welfare; municipal art as shown in 
the architecture, sculpture and color decorations of 
the new Los Angeles library; housing betterment, 
and the production of goods by convict labor. 

In drama study, time was given to comparison of 
current American plays, to discussion of English plays 
and the experiment of Provincetown players; to the 
Yiddish theatre and its remarkable play, the Dybbuk. 



JUNE, 1926 



Page 9 



The Amateur Dramatic Club gave a Chinese play 
with the finish of much rehearsal, and as a reward 
of diligence besides the prizes given, four one-act 
plays written by competing members, were allowed 
professional production by the Friday Morning Club. 

The Literature department has inquired into the 
most daring of modern publications, has considered 
fairly all books coming to its attention, made studies 
of writers, reviewed late plays, travel books and 
biographies. 

In the department of Fine Arts, widely known 
speakers have talked on mural paintings and construc- 
tive art training; art values in civic centers; art stu- 
dents abroad ; Japanese lacquers, miniatures, etch- 
ings, sculpture and architecture; lively discussions 
came to pass between ultra-conservatives and ultra- 
modernists. A new display was arranged each month 
in the art gallery, from the arts and crafts guild, 
architectural renderings and photographs, work of 
local and foreign artists and sculptors, and selected 
exhibits from other galleries. By courtesy of the 
Huntington library and private collectors, a rare 
showing of Shakespeareana was given for one week 
in April. Monthly studio tours and visits to estates 
formed a definite share of the year's art study in 
technique of construction and landscaping of grounds. 



LONG BEACH EBELL 

By Ruth Brisbin Curry 

Ebell Club of Long Beach will have as its presi- 
dent next year Mrs. H. W. Spratt, who comes to the 
office with a long period of successful club service 
behind her. Other officers elected are: Mrs. Charles 
F. Ross, first vice-president; Mrs. Burr A. Brown, 
second vice-president ; Miss Buelah Peck, third vice- 
president; Mrs. Stuart Chapman, recording secretary; 
Mrs. Fred Metzer, corresponding secretary; Mrs. 
Earl Burns Miller, federation secretary; Mrs. J. K. 
Reid, financial secretary; Mrs. F. C. Blair, treasurer; 
Mrs. Charles A. Wiley, auditor; Mrs. J. Robert Poor, 
parliamentarian; Mrs. Walter Case, conductor of de- 
partments; Mrs. Sumner Davis, general chairman of 
standing committees. 

Mrs. Katheryn Dyer, author and entertainer, was 
welcomed home by the club after several months of 
travel. She arrived just in time to give the program 
for which she was scheduled. Mrs. Dyer was assisted 
by Mrs. Walter Lourie Porterfield and Mrs. Madeline 
Lupher Gareiner. Mrs. Porterfield's rich contralto 
was heard in a song of dramatic fervor "Farewell ye 
Hills" (Tschaikowsky), representing the goodby of 
Joan d'Arc when she was called to the defense of 
France. Mozart's beautiful little "Lullaby" was her 
encore. 

"I believe if we would analyze the history of other 
countries before we criticize, we would find that cir- 
cumstances down through the ages have produced 
certain conditions," said Mrs. Dyer in opening her in- 
timate talk descriptive of the people of various na- 
tions with whom she came in contact during her 
prolonged journey abroad. Having just returned 
home the speaker's impressions were partiaularly 
vivid and interesting, as she brought out a number 
of every day facts generally overlooked by the re- 
turned traveler bent upon drawing word pictures of 
historic churches, art galleries and famous cafes. 
"The heart of the world is kind," said Mrs. Dyer, 
"and that is the hopeful sign of the times. I believe 
the contacts of travel will bring an understanding that 
will help the world out of its problems." Much of 
Mrs. Dyer's talk centered on the French people, whom 
she lauded for their courage, their beautifully dressed 
and well-behaved children, who are provided with 
ample playgrounds, and for their tree conservation. 
She found the Riviera not unlike California in a topo- 
graphical way, and said that the little town of Monte 
Carlo is so picturesque that it is worth a visit for 




Mrs. Myron fVestnver 

Second Vice-President of the 

Friday Morning Club 

itself alone. 

The Ebell clubhouse debt was cut materially dur- 
ing the last year as co-operation between the twenty 
finance groups resulted in raising $11,390.27. And 
this amount of money does not cover quite all that 
was earned, because reports are incomplete in several 
instances. 

Mrs. R. J. Booth, chairman of ways and means, 
exhibited much pride in announcing this sizable sum 
and she showed her appreciation to the workers as 
a whole by recognizing in a charmingly individual 
way the fine qualities of each worker. The quota 
allotted to each group was $500 which was reached 
by most of them despite the handicap several had of 
starting their work late in the season. 



THE TUESDAY MORNING 
CLUB 

By Mrs. T. W. Barton, Press Chairman 
The Tuesday Morning Club of Los Angeles, though 
small in numbers, is quite a live wire. In March, 
the club in a body visited the Bishop Candy factory, 
by invitation, and had a very instructive, and interest- 
ing visit. The week before Easter, we made some 
little dresses for some of the little patients in the 
General Hospital, who were going out for a visit 
Easter Sunday. We also sent a number of Easter 
baskets and flowers to the sick and shut-ins. For 
April, we made a number of quilts for the Midnight 
Mission, and sent a quantity of men's clothes, which 
were greatly appreciated. In May, Mrs. Lessler, 
one of our members, entertained the club with a de- 
lightful card party in honor of the new president- 
elect, Mrs. WicklifFe Matthews. 

All members of this club are asked to report any 
case which comes under their notice, where we can 
be of any help or service. 



Page 10 



The CLUBWOMAN 



I 



Tio^ ^v^i^^h^^ ^de&G 



IIPIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIII 




By Emma B. Keepers, Acting Press Chairman 



The month of June will end the club's activities for 
the season, so far as weekly and monthly meetings 
are concerned — but it by no means ends the work of 
the club — for this will doubtless be the busiest year 
Ebell has known. All summer women will meet and 
discuss and arrange for the new club house — which 
is looked forward to with so much eagerness. Leisure 
will be a thing unknown for the executive committee. 

The devotion given by Mrs. William Read, our 
president, has been indefatigable. She is working 
with a rare understanding of constructive matters 
and with an adaptability which must be unusual as 
there seemjs not to have been confusion — friction — 
difficulties — or failures. Can one say much more of 
a leader than that she brings to her work a physical, 
mental, and spiritual fitness which seem to cast diffi- 
culties aside? She has been swept into a third year's 
service with an enthusiasm that proves the confidence 
of the club and its affection. 

Each woman's work in the different departments 
tests her ability as leader and hostess, and shows that 
the chairmanship cannot be taken casually, for serious 
work and much time are necessary to do justice to 
the things undertaken ; and only women willing to 
add this to the talent they possess should attempt it. 

The annual luncheon of the Drama Department on 
Wednesday, May 26th, with Mrs. Purdue as hostess, 
was of more than usual interest. Roger Noble Burn- 
ham, the sculptor, was the speaker and his topic 
"Clubwomen and the Drama." He is a finished 
actor as well as a sculptor and his equipment is an 
important factor in the work he does, as he combines 
many talents. He speaks with authority. Eastern 
magazines feature him as a sculptor and Vernon Kel- 
logg, in his article on Luther Burbank in Literary 
Digest — has produced a picture of Mr. Burnham and 
the study he has made of his friend, Mr. Burbank. 
Mr. Burnham is a Harvard man and, after graduat- 
ing, he was teacher there for six years. His whimsi- 
cal, quaint manner and his quiet humor mark him 
as a man of distinction. He and his talented wife, 
Eleanore Waring Burnham, are becoming more and 
more anticipated in art circles. The studios which 
they have established in the various cities where they 
have lived, have always drawn people interested in 
art movements. While in Rome, they had their studio, 
also in Boston, in Honolulu, in Berkeley, and now 
they have chosen to make Los Angeles their home. 
Mr. Burnham makes us feel that the two arts, drama 
and sculpture, are a background of vital importance. 
Have not the great arts of the past been the language 
of the dominating social impulses of their various 
periods? He says, "We are living in an era of con- 
structive commercialism — which has so far been ex- 
pressing itself in business organizations and improve- 
ments of the mechanical means of carrying on the 
necessary work of the world." The socializing in- 
fluences which are needed to adapt the commercial 
and the mechanical to the cultural needs of humanity 
are becoming more and more understood. The need 
of the world today is finding its outlet through the 
various woman club's movements, which, for the 
greater part, found their origin in this country. It 
is therefore necessary that the great social impulses 
of the present day must find in the arts their medium 
of expression, even as religion has found, its expres- 
sion through the arts. Having been for eight years 
a member of the Rotary Club, and having been sent 




Mrs. William Read, President Ebell Club 



to three international conventions, he is prepared for 
authoritative opinions. The Drama department has 
reason to be proud of its year's achievement, having 
produced twelve plays through its workshop. Five 
of these were under the direction of Mrs. Bender, 
while the others were supervised by the Juniors' 
Drama Department. 

Mrs. Jack Vallely who has led the Books and Cur- 
rent Literature department for two years has at last 
been persuaded to assume that responsibility for a 
third year, nearly an unprecedented thing. Letters, 
telephone calls, urgent requests have made it so popu- 
lar a desire that when she was asked to add one 
more year to the glory of things done, she must have 
felt that she was in good company, for Mrs. William 
Read, Mrs. Randall Jewett and Mrs. Vallely all 
have the distinction of being chosen for a third year. 
Each month Mrs. Vallely has reviewed books for the 
club to a large group of most appreciative women. 
Frequently ten books have been discussed and, in 
such a manner, as to make a reading of these books 
unnecessary, or has incited so keen a zest for a cer- 
tain book that the club in either case has been en- 
riched. Mrs. Vallely has given regular book talks 
before twelve clubs this season, many being out-of- 
town clubs. 

On Wednesday, May 19, the final book talks and 
the luncheon following, were of great interest. At 
the morning's meeting Mrs. Louise Ward Watkins 
read and discussed The Sisters — from Amy Lowell's 



JUXE, 1926 



Page 11 



"What O'clock." This gave her an opportunity to 
mention three of our great women poets besides Amy 
Lowell herself. Mrs. Walter E. Mitchell made us 
wish to re-read "The Way of All Flesh," by Samuel 
Butler. The ground covered by Mrs. Vallely is of 
vital importance as she discussed many books and 
read several bits of fine poetry — and ended her year's 
work with one of